Skip header and navigation

Refine By

17 records – page 1 of 2.

[Chlamydia trachomatis infection in women seeking termination of pregnancy 1985-2000]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63359
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Jun 17;124(12):1638-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-17-2004
Author
Inger Johanne Bakken
Finn Egil Skjeldestad
Svein Arne Nordbø
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for epidemiologisk forskning, SINTEF Helse, 7465 Trondheim. inger.j.bakken@sintef.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Jun 17;124(12):1638-40
Date
Jun-17-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion Applicants - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Chlamydia Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - classification - isolation & purification
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Mass Screening
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - microbiology
Prevalence
Registries
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to analyse trends for Chlamydia trachomatis infection in a population of women seeking termination of pregnancy, and to assess whether socio-demographic characteristics are predictive of such infections. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Since 1983 women seeking abortion in the university hospital in Trondheim have been systematically tested for Chlamydia trachomatis. Data on 11,376 abortions (1985-2000) were included in the study and results were analysed with logistic regression. RESULTS: Age-adjusted prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis decreased from 9.0% to 5.0% in 1999-2000. The prevalence was highest among the youngest women. Single and cohabiting women had a higher prevalence of chlamydial infections than married women. INTERPRETATION: Women terminating their pregnancy are an excellent population for sentinel surveillance of Chlamydia trachomatis infection because of their young age, high proportion of singles, and relative inconsistent use of contraception. Even though the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis has decreased over the 16-year study period, it is still high for women seeking abortion, especially in the youngest age groups.
PubMed ID
15229710 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Emergency service consultations and the list patient system]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30497
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 19;124(4):508-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-19-2004
Author
Bjørnar Nyen
Morten Lindbaek
Author Affiliation
Stiftelsen GRUK (Gruppe for kvalitetsutvikling i sosial- og helsetjenesten), Nedre Hjellegt. 1, 3724 Skien. bnyen@gruk.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 19;124(4):508-9
Date
Feb-19-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
After-Hours Care - utilization
Aged
Child
Emergency Medical Services - utilization
English Abstract
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Reform - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Norway
Referral and Consultation - utilization
Registries
Regression Analysis
Abstract
BACKGROUND: We wanted to analyse the frequency of list patient consultations in the off-hour emergency service in Skien. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Over one year, all emergency service consultations between 4 PM and 11 PM on workdays were registered according to the general practitioner (GP) patients used and divided by the number of patients on each list. We performed a multiple linear regression analysis with number of consultations adjusted for the total patient number on the list as the dependent variable. RESULTS: We found great variation in the consultation rate among patients listed by various GPs. The consultation rate was significantly associated with the practice in which the GP worked. Quarterly feedback of the results to doctors did not change the consultation pattern. INTERPRETATION: The use of the off-hour emergency service is associated with certain practice characteristics. We assume that the variation results from differences in accessibility by telephone, in the capacity for taking in patients needing urgent attention, and in varying degree of attention to service in the practices.
PubMed ID
14983201 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Gender as a variable in patient satisfaction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52410
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Nov 10;120(27):3283-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-2000
Author
C. Foss
Author Affiliation
Institutt for sykepleievitenskap, Det medisinske fakultet, Postboks 1120 Blindern 0317 Oslo. cfoss@ulrik.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Nov 10;120(27):3283-6
Date
Nov-10-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Discharge
Patient satisfaction
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Whether gender affects patient satisfaction is still debated. This article focuses on methodological issues in analysing gender differences with emphasis on factors like age and educational level. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 1,469 male and 1,226 female patients returned a questionnaire six weeks after discharge from hospital. Gender differences in satisfaction were examined by multiple regression analysis. RESULTS: The weak gender difference that occurred in overall satisfaction was due to a significant gender difference between young patients' assessment of the quality of nursing care. For patients over 35, there was no gender difference in satisfaction. INTERPRETATION: Gender differences in patient satisfaction are not straightforward, but vary according to underlying cultural and social factors.
PubMed ID
11187170 View in PubMed
Less detail

General practice consultations and use of prescription drugs after changes to school absence policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287475
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2017 09 05;137(16)
Publication Type
Article
Date
09-05-2017
Author
Inger Johanne Bakken
Knut-Arne Wensaas
Kari Furu
Gry Marysol Grøneng
Camilla Stoltenberg
Simon Øverland
Siri Eldevik Håberg
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2017 09 05;137(16)
Date
09-05-2017
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Analgesics - supply & distribution
Anti-Bacterial Agents - supply & distribution
Antitussive Agents - supply & distribution
Contraceptive Agents - supply & distribution
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Gastrointestinal Diseases - drug therapy - epidemiology
General Practice - statistics & numerical data
Headache - drug therapy - epidemiology
Humans
Mental Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology
Multi-Ingredient Cold, Flu, and Allergy Medications - supply & distribution
Norway - epidemiology
Policy
Psychotropic Drugs - supply & distribution
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Regression Analysis
Remote Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology
Schools - standards
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
New rules for absence with stricter requirements for documentation were introduced in upper secondary schools in the autumn of 2016. We investigated the use of general practice services and dispensing of prescription drugs among 16?–?18-year-olds in the autumn of 2016 and compared this with equivalent figures for the period 2013?–?15.
We retrieved information on consultations in general practice (GP) and dispensing of prescription drugs to 15?–?18-year-olds in the period 2013?–?16 from the Directorate of Health’s system for control and payment of health reimbursements (KUHR) and the Norwegian Prescription Database respectively. The number of consultations and dispensing of drugs were compared to previous years using Poisson regression (reference year 2015). The incidence rate ratio (IRR) was used as an outcome measure.
The number of GP consultations for 16?–?18-year-olds was 30?% higher in the autumn of 2016 than in the autumn of 2015 (IRR 1.30, 95?% confidence interval (CI) 1.29?–?1.31). In the same period, the dispensing of drugs to this age group increased by 8?% (IRR 1.08, 95?% CI 1.08?–?1.09). Among the diagnosis groups, respiratory tract infections had the largest increase (IRR 2.21, 95?% CI 2.17?–?2.25). The largest increase in drug dispensing was found for remedies for coughs and colds (IRR 1.73, 95?% CI 1.65?–?1.80).
The increase in consultations in general practice and dispensing of drugs to 16?–?18-year-olds coincided in time with the introduction of new rules for absence from school. We hold it to be highly likely that the changes were caused by the stricter rules for documentation of absence from school.
PubMed ID
28871761 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Health status of patients on waiting lists]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71854
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Aug 20;121(19):2256-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-2001
Author
T. Iversen
G S Kopperud
Author Affiliation
Helseøkonomisk forskningsprogram ved Universitetet i Oslo (HERO) Senter for helseadministrasjon Universitetet i Oslo Rikshospitalet 0027 Oslo. tor.iversen@samfunnsmed.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Aug 20;121(19):2256-60
Date
Aug-20-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
English Abstract
Female
Health status
Hospital Bed Capacity - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Selection
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The waiting lists for hospital admission are used as arguments for more resources to hospitals. Concern is expressed that the attention given to waiting list patients has the effect that less resources are devoted to other groups of patients. This article reports on a study of whether waiting list patients are in poorer health that persons who are not on a waiting list. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A random sample of 5,000 Norwegian citizens were drawn to be included in Statistics Norway's 1998 quality and standard of life survey. Interviews were obtained with 3,449 persons. Binomial and multinomial logistic analyses were used. RESULTS: Individuals in poor health have a higher probability of being on a hospital waiting list than have persons in good health. We did not find any relationship between state of health and a patient's experienced waiting time. INTERPRETATION: Our findings reject the assertion of arbitrariness regarding the selection of patients to hospital waiting lists. The lack of effect of state of health on experienced waiting time could be interpreted in several ways.
PubMed ID
11571875 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Hospital capacity and waiting time for treatment--is there a connection?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20093
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Oct 20;120(25):2988-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-2000
Author
H. Piene
M. Loeb
K G Hem
Author Affiliation
SINTEF Unimed, Trondheim.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Oct 20;120(25):2988-92
Date
Oct-20-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
English Abstract
Health Resources - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Bed Capacity - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Statistical
Norway
Regression Analysis
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The association between hospital capacity and waiting time for treatment is uncertain. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Waiting times for patients on waiting lists for inpatient treatment in 1998 were analysed to disclose possible associations with the hospitals' treatment resources, i.e., general costs, number of beds, doctors or nurses in relation to the population of its catchment area, and the relation between acute and elective admissions. Waiting times were calculated from the National Patient Register, which collects information on hospital stays. Resource data and data on acute admissions were taken from the SAMDATA publications for 1998. RESULTS: Median waiting time varied from 50 to 300 days among the hospitals. Statistical regression models were, however, unable to explain the variation in waiting time on the basis of any variable related to hospital resources or acute admissions that may influence the capacity for elective admissions. INTERPRETATION: To avoid breaches of the guarantees for patients guaranteed a maximum of three months on the waiting list, the median waiting time should be below 12-15 days. This goal may, however, be much too ambitious in view of the fact that the median waiting time for patients with mammary or colon cancer is about 30 days.
PubMed ID
11109383 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Infant mortality in Asker and Baerum in the 18th and 19th century]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58105
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Dec 15;125(24):3468-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2005
Author
Eli Fure
Author Affiliation
Riksarkivet, Postboks 4013 Ullevål stadion, 0806 Oslo. eli.fure@riksarkivaren.dep.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Dec 15;125(24):3468-71
Date
Dec-15-2005
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Databases
English Abstract
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
Humans
Infant Mortality - history - trends
Infant, Newborn
Norway - epidemiology
Registries
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The decline in infant mortality is an important part of the secular decline in mortality in the western world. The major causes of the decline are subject to controversy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Individual event records from censuses, church records and land registers from two Norwegian parishes during the years 1814-1878 were registered and linked into individual life course records. Around 15,000 infants, of whom 1500 died, were analysed in depth with Cox regression analysis. The total yearly counts of births and infant deaths from 1735 were analysed using ordinary linear regression. RESULTS: Infant mortality hovered around 23 per cent during the middle of the 18th century and fell to a level around 10 per cent by the end of the 19th century. The decline was strongest during the neonatal period. Women born during the first decade of the 19th century, a decade known for a succession of years with bad harvests, war and high infant mortality, gave birth to infants with increased neonatal mortality. INTERPRETATION: The decline in infant mortality during the first part of the 19th century can thus be attributed to an improvement in the health of the mothers dating back to their own fetal or infant stage. The decline took place in the absence of trained medical personnel.
PubMed ID
16357896 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Medication among pensioners in homes for the aged and nursing homes].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229236
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Apr 30;110(11):1335-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-1990
Author
F B Rørvik
K. Laake
Author Affiliation
Institutt for allmennmedisin, Universitetet i Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Apr 30;110(11):1335-8
Date
Apr-30-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Drug Therapy - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Drug Utilization
Female
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Male
Norway
Nursing Homes
Regression Analysis
Abstract
The prescribing of drugs was studied in 378 patients living in 12 homes for the aged in the county of Aust-Agder, Norway. The mean number of regular drugs was 4.7. Out of a total of 378 patients, more than 8 drugs were prescribed to one out of four and only 13 received no drugs at all. 30% of the prescriptions referred to over-the-counter drugs. Laxatives (10.4%), vitamins (9.0%), and pscychotropics (8.2%) were the three most commonly prescribed classes of drugs. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the most significant predictor of the number of drugs prescribed to a patient is the doctor in charge.
PubMed ID
2339377 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Quality of rapid tests for determination of infectious mononucleosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193985
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Jun 10;121(15):1793-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-10-2001
Author
K J Skurtveit
W I Bjelkarøy
N G Christensen
G. Thue
S. Sandberg
G. Hoddevik
Author Affiliation
NOKLUS Seksjon for allmennmedisin Institutt for samfunnsmedisinske fag Universitetet i Bergen Ulriksdal 8c 5009 Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Jun 10;121(15):1793-7
Date
Jun-10-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agglutination Tests - standards
Hemagglutination Tests - standards
Humans
Infectious Mononucleosis - diagnosis - immunology
Laboratories - standards
Norway
Primary Health Care - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Reagent Kits, Diagnostic - standards
Regression Analysis
Serologic Tests - standards
Abstract
The Norwegian centre for quality assurance in primary health care, NOKLUS, was established in 1992 to ensure the quality of laboratory analyses performed in primary health care. This article evaluates results from the surveys of infectious mononucleosis.
From 1996 to 2000, five serum panels were sent to participating practices in order to control test-kits designed for serological rapid diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis. 648 practices participated in this external quality assessment in 2000. Target values were determined using the Paul Bunell Davidsohn test. The results obtained for each type of test and variables that might have affected the results were evaluated.
Outdated kits or kits close to the date of expiration showed poorer results than the other test-kits. The quality of the results depended mainly on the type of test-kit used and the training level of the persons performing the analyses.
The best performing tests in these surveys were Clearview IM (Unipath Limited) and Contrast Mono (Genzyme diagnostics). These two tests are among the three most frequently used tests, out of a total of thirteen, in our surveys.
PubMed ID
11464683 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Sickness absence associated with major life events].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123758
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 May 29;132(10):1231-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-29-2012
Author
Simen Markussen
Ole Røgeberg
Author Affiliation
Stiftelsen Frischsenteret for samfunnsøkonomiskforskning, Norway. simen.markussen@frisch.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 May 29;132(10):1231-4
Date
May-29-2012
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Death
Divorce
Family
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Registries
Regression Analysis
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data - trends
Abstract
Sickness absence in the Norwegian workplace doubled in the period 1993-2003. However, the extent to which the driving factors were medical or non-medical remains unclear, as does the extent to which the cause may be found in the composition of the workforce.
A differences-in-differences regression model was used to estimate the added sickness absence associated with major life events such as separation, death of spouse and pregnancy in the period 1993-2005. The data were obtained from administrative registers covering the entire Norwegian population, and include all absence periods of 16 days' duration or more reported by a doctor's medical certificate. The primary outcome measures were incidence (the proportion of absentees in a given time window) and absence (the proportion of sick days in a given time window). The level of absence among employees exposed to the specified life events was compared to control groups matched for gender, age, education and income.
In 1993, people in each of the three groups exposed to major life events had more frequent and longer periods of absence than people in the control groups. This added sickness absence increased between 1993 and 2005. The changes in added sickness absence were at times significant, particularly for pregnant women. While sickness absence among pregnant women in 1993 was 15.4 percentage points higher than in the control group, the difference had increased to 24.8 percentage points in 2005.
We find it improbable for the increase in added sickness absence to be caused by changes in the medical impact of life events or alterations in the workforce composition. We believe the increase is caused by changing attitudes among the working population and in the medical profession towards sickness absence on grounds that are not strictly medical, combined with improved social acceptance and diagnosis of mental health issues, and/or a medicalisation of natural health variations (pregnancy) and emotional distress (grief).
PubMed ID
22669383 View in PubMed
Less detail

17 records – page 1 of 2.