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1649 records – page 1 of 165.

A 2-year follow-up of 120 Swedish female alcoholics treated early in their drinking career: prediction of drinking outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10097
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2001 Nov;25(11):1586-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
B. Haver
L. Dahlgren
A. Willander
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Alcohol and Drug Research Section, Stockholm, Sweden. brit.haver@psyk.uib.no
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2001 Nov;25(11):1586-93
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - therapy
Biological Markers
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Patient Dropouts
Recurrence
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: One hundred twenty women alcoholics recruited to a treatment program called EWA (Early Treatment for Women With Alcohol Addiction) were studied. The selected women were not previously treated for alcohol abuse. METHODS: The women were followed up by use of a structured personal interview, biomarkers sensitive for alcohol abuse (i.e., glutamyl transpeptidase), and questionnaires, by using defined criteria for abstinence, social drinking, satisfactory drinking outcome, and unsatisfactory drinking outcome. RESULTS: Drinking outcome was good (i.e., total abstinence, social drinking, or satisfactory drinking outcome) for 67% of the women during the total follow-up time, by use of strict criteria for relapse. The results were corroborated by the biomarkers. Similar results were reported from two previously studied groups of women from the same department. However, the frequency of abstinence was higher and social drinking was significantly lower among this sample of women. Daily drinking, the use of sedatives, and a long duration of pretreatment alcohol abuse predicted an unfavorable outcome. However, a long duration of outpatient treatment predicted a good outcome, whereas treatment dropout was related to an unsatisfactory drinking outcome. A majority of the women (96%) rated the treatment experience and the treatment program favorably. The overall good results might reflect the selection of the subjects studied. CONCLUSIONS: Improving treatment program adherence would probably improve outcome for the women with an unsatisfactory drinking outcome.
PubMed ID
11707633 View in PubMed
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The 3 mm skin prick test (SPT) threshold criterion is not reliable for Tyrophagus putrescentiae: the re-evaluation of SPT criterion to dust mites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71486
Source
Allergy. 2002 Dec;57(12):1187-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
B. Kanceljak-Macan
J. Macan
D. Plavec
T. Klepac
S. Milkovic-Kraus
Author Affiliation
Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb, Croatia.
Source
Allergy. 2002 Dec;57(12):1187-90
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibody Specificity - immunology
Comparative Study
Croatia
Cross Reactions - immunology
Dermatophagoides farinae - immunology
Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus - immunology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Proteins - immunology
Pyroglyphidae - immunology
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Skin Tests - standards
Urban health
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The mean wheal diameter >/= 3 mm is the usual criterion for positive skin prick test (SPT) reaction to dust mites. The study assessed the accuracy of this SPT criterion with respect to specific IgE values of above 0.35 kUA/l (+ sIgE). METHODS: Specific IgE (ImmunoCAP, Pharmacia AB Diagnostics, Uppsala, Sweden) and standard SPT to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP) and farinae (DF), Lepidoglyphus destructor (LD) and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (TP) (ALK, Hørsholm, Denmark) were performed in a random sample of 457 subjects, of whom 273 men (mean age 35.3 +/- 11.0 years) and 184 women (mean age 37.9 +/- 9.5 years). Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test, regression analysis and discriminant analysis. RESULTS: When the mean wheal diameter of >/= 3 mm was considered positive (+ SPT), the correlation between + SPT and + sIgE was 0.47 for DP (P
PubMed ID
12464048 View in PubMed
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[10-year follow-up study of mortality among users of hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179879
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Apr 26;166(18):1679-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-2004

10 year follow up study of mortality among users of hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9689
Source
BMJ. 2003 Jul 12;327(7406):81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-12-2003
Author
Merete Nordentoft
Nina Wandall-Holm
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Bispebjerg Hospital, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, 2400 Copenhagen NV, Denmark. merete.nordentoft@dadlnet.dk
Source
BMJ. 2003 Jul 12;327(7406):81
Date
Jul-12-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate mortality among users of hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen, and to identify predictors of death such as conditions during upbringing, mental illness, and misuse of alcohol and drugs. DESIGN: Register based follow up study. SETTING: Two hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen, Denmark PARTICIPANTS: 579 people who stayed in one hostel in Copenhagen in 1991, and a representative sample of 185 people who stayed in the original hostel and one other in Copenhagen. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Cause specific mortality. RESULTS: The age and sex standardised mortality ratio for both sexes was 3.8 (95% confidence interval 3.5 to 4.1); 2.8 (2.6 to 3.1) for men and 5.6 (4.3 to 6.9) for women. The age and sex standardised mortality ratio for suicide for both sexes was 6.0 (3.9 to 8.1), for death from natural causes 2.6 (2.3 to 2.9), for unintentional injuries 14.6 (11.4 to 17.8), and for unknown cause of death 62.9 (52.7 to 73.2). Mortality was comparatively higher in the younger age groups. It was also significantly higher among homeless people who had stayed in a hostel more than once and stayed fewer than 11 days, compared with the rest of the study group. Risk factors for early death were premature death of the father and misuse of alcohol and sedatives. CONCLUSION: Homeless people staying in hostels, particularly young women, are more likely to die early than the general population. Other predictors of early death include adverse experiences in childhood, such as death of the father, and misuse of alcohol and sedatives.
PubMed ID
12855527 View in PubMed
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A 10-year prospective study of tobacco smoking and periodontal health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67464
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
J. Bergström
S. Eliasson
J. Dock
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Music
Observer Variation
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To date only a few studies have evaluated the long-term influence of smoking and smoking cessation on periodontal health. The present study, therefore, was undertaken with the aim to prospectively investigate the influence of smoking exposure over time on the periodontal health condition in a targeted population before and after a follow-up interval of 10 years. METHODS: The primary study base consisted of a population of occupational musicians that was investigated the first time in 1982 and scheduled for reinvestigation in 1992 and 2002. The 1992 investigation included 101 individuals from the baseline study constituting a prospective cohort including 16 smokers, who had continued to smoke throughout the entire length of the 10-year period; 28 former smokers who had ceased smoking an average of approximately 9 years before the commencement of the baseline study; 40 non-smokers, who denied ever having smoked tobacco; and 17 individuals whose smoking pattern changed or for whom incomplete data were available. The clinical and radiographic variables used for the assessment of the periodontal health condition of the individual were frequency of periodontally diseased sites (probing depth > or =4 mm), gingival bleeding (%), and periodontal bone height (%). The oral hygiene standard was evaluated by means of a standard plaque index. RESULTS: The changes over the 10 years with respect to frequency of diseased sites indicated an increased frequency in continuous smokers versus decreased frequencies in former smokers and non-smokers. Controlling for age and frequency of diseased sites at baseline, the 10-year change was significantly associated with smoking (P
PubMed ID
10972650 View in PubMed
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Ability for self-care among home dwelling elderly people in a health district in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72190
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2000 Aug;37(4):361-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
O. Söderhamn
C. Lindencrona
A. Ek
Author Affiliation
Vänersborg University College of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 236, SE-462 23, Vänersborg, Sweden.
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2000 Aug;37(4):361-8
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Care
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe the ability for self-care among home dwelling elderly in the community in a health district in western Sweden. Two self-report instruments plus a number of self-care related questions were distributed by mail to an age stratified random sample and finally completed by a total of 125 subjects. Bivariate and multivariate statistical methods were used in the analyses. The results showed that self-care ability and self-care agency decreased for respondents 75+ years of age. Self-care ability was predicted by three productive means for self-care and four risk factors.
PubMed ID
10760543 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal social organization, contemporary experience and American Indian adolescent alcohol use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9665
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2003 Jul;64(4):450-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Paul Spicer
Douglas K Novins
Christina M Mitchell
Janette Beals
Author Affiliation
American Indian and Alaska Native Programs, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Nighthorse Campbell Native Health Building, P.O. Box 6508, Mailstop F800, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA. paul.spicer@uchsc.edu
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2003 Jul;64(4):450-7
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - psychology
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Oceanic Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
United States - ethnology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Anthropologists with an interest in American Indian alcohol use have long held that how native people drink has been conditioned by aspects of the social organization of their societies prior to the disruptive influences of European colonialism. Our goal in this article was to explicitly test the importance of these factors in four contemporary American Indian cultural groups. METHOD: Using data on adolescent alcohol use drawn from the first full wave of the longitudinal Voices of Indian Teens Project (N = 1,651, 51% female), we tested whether patterns of quantity-frequency of alcohol use and the negative consequences of alcohol use predicted by social organzational variables were found among contemporary adolescents and, subsequently, whether these differences persisted when other, more proximal, variables were included. RESULTS: Cultural differences appeared to account for a small percentage of the variance in both quantity-frequency of alcohol use and negative consequences in the initial steps of our analyses, but the pattern in these data was not consistent with the predictions of existing theories regarding aboriginal social organization. Moreover, these cultural differences were no longer significant in the final step of our analyses, suggesting that the cultural differences that did exist were better explained by other factors, at least among these adolescents. CONCLUSIONS: Although these analyses did not indicate that culture was irrelevant in understanding adolescent alcohol use in American Indian communities, classic formulations of these effects were of limited utility in understanding the experiences of contemporary American Indian adolescents.
Notes
Erratum In: J Stud Alcohol. 2004 Jan;65(1):153
PubMed ID
12921186 View in PubMed
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Absence of cardiovascular benefits and sportfish consumption among St. Lawrence River anglers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182864
Source
Environ Res. 2003 Nov;93(3):241-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Catherine Godin
Bryna Shatenstein
Gilles Paradis
Tom Kosatsky
Author Affiliation
Département de Médecine Sociale et préventive, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. catherine.godin@bigfoot.com
Source
Environ Res. 2003 Nov;93(3):241-7
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Diet
Dietary Fats
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - pharmacology
Fisheries
Fishes
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Seasons
Abstract
The benefits of sportfish consumption and omega-3 fatty acid (omega3-FA) intake for cardiovascular risk factors were evaluated in a sample of 112 male fishers from the St. Lawrence River in the Montreal area during the 1996 winter and fall fishing seasons. A questionnaire on fishing practices and fish consumption was administered, and fasting blood samples were collected for lipid and phospholipid determination. Linear regression analyses, which considered the confounding effect of major risk factors, did not show any significant association between measured omega3-FAs or reported fish intake and blood lipids or blood pressure. This study is limited by its low statistical power due to the small sample size and the possibility that the fish eaten by the participants were low in omega3-FAs or that the participants diets contained foods high in cholesterol-raising fat.
PubMed ID
14615233 View in PubMed
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Access and interest: two important issues in considering the feasibility of web-assisted tobacco interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154400
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2008;10(5):e37
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
John A Cunningham
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada. John_Cunningham@camh.net
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2008;10(5):e37
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Feasibility Studies
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health Surveys
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Predictive value of tests
Regression Analysis
Smoking - adverse effects
Smoking Cessation - methods
Telephone
Therapy, Computer-Assisted - methods
User-Computer Interface
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous research has found that current smokers are less likely to have access to the Internet than nonsmokers. As access to the Internet continues to expand, does this finding remain true? Also, how many smokers are interested in Web-assisted tobacco interventions (WATIs)? These questions are important to determine the potential role that WATIs might play in promoting tobacco cessation.
The aims of the study were to determine whether smokers are less likely than nonsmokers to have access to the Internet and to establish the level of interest in WATIs among a representative sample of smokers.
A random digit dialing telephone survey was conducted of 8467 adult respondents, 18 years and older, in Ontario, Canada from September 2006 to August 2007. All respondents were asked their smoking status and whether they used the Internet (at home or work in the past 12 months; where; how often in the past 12 months). To assess the level of interest in WATIs, current daily smokers were asked whether they would be interested in a confidential program that they could access on the Internet, free of charge, that would allow them to check their smoking and compare it to other Canadians.
Smokers were marginally less likely to have used the Internet than nonsmokers (74% vs 81% in the last year), and, of those who had access to the Internet, smokers used the Internet less often than nonsmokers. Overall, 40% of smokers said they would be interested in a WATI. The number of cigarettes smoked per day was unrelated to level of interest in the WATI, but time to first cigarette after waking was. Smokers who used the Internet were more interested in the WATI than smokers who did not use the Internet (46% vs 20%).
While the difference in level of Internet use between smokers and nonsmokers was greatly reduced compared to 2002 and 2004 data, smokers still remain marginally less likely to use the Internet than nonsmokers. Overall, there was a substantial level of interest in the WATI among smokers, in particular among smokers who currently use the Internet. These results indicate that WATIs have a substantial potential audience among smokers, and, given the growing body of evidence regarding their efficacy, there is growing support that WATIs have a significant role to play in promoting tobacco cessation.
Notes
Cites: Br J Addict. 1989 Jul;84(7):791-92758152
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2005;7(1):e215829474
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2005 Apr;7(2):207-1616036277
Cites: J Health Commun. 2005;10 Suppl 1:105-1816377603
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2006;8(3):e1717032633
Cites: Tob Control. 2006 Feb;15(1):7-1216436397
Cites: Addict Behav. 2006 Feb;31(2):264-7715950392
Cites: Drug Alcohol Rev. 2006 Jan;25(1):79-8416492580
Cites: Med Inform Internet Med. 2006 Mar;31(1):53-816754367
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2006 Jan;75(1):110-616125450
PubMed ID
18984558 View in PubMed
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Access to physician treatment for a mental disorder: a regional analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198775
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2000 Feb;35(2):61-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
H. Stuart
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health & Epidemiology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. hh11@post.queensu.ca
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2000 Feb;35(2):61-70
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Physicians - supply & distribution
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This study examined (1) disparities in the proportion of persons who accessed a physician for treatment of a diagnosed mental disorder across 17 health regions in Alberta, Canada, and (2) the extent to which regional disparities in physician access could be explained by differences in regional demographies, population needs, or physician supply.
The study illustrates the use of ecological comparisons for regional health system performance evaluations. Regional characteristics were aggregated from four sources of data: the health insurance registry file (population denominators and regional demographies), physician claims data (treatment access), census data (social indicators of population need), and the medical directory of the College of Physicians of Surgeons (physician supply).
Regional variability in needs-adjusted measures of access to physician-based treatment services were comparatively small (varying by a factor of 1.6). Models containing adjustments for demography, need, and physician supply explained 41% of regional variation in access. Of the total variation explained, physician supply explained a smaller proportion (39%) in comparison to social demography and needs (61%). Few large regional imbalances were noted when needs-adjusted and supply-adjusted estimates were compared. Only two areas appeared to be underserviced in comparison to their local needs, reflecting approximately 6% of the provincial population.
While all three study factors proved important, findings support the broad conclusion that social demography and social risk (a proxy for need) will remain the key determinants predicting access to physician services for treatment of mental disorders in publicly funded health systems.
PubMed ID
10784368 View in PubMed
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1649 records – page 1 of 165.