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46 records – page 1 of 5.

1913 men study - a longitudinal study of the development of stroke in a population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250389
Source
Scand J Soc Med Suppl. 1977;14:122-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Author
R. Adolfsson
K. Svärdsudd
G. Tibblin
Source
Scand J Soc Med Suppl. 1977;14:122-7
Date
1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood pressure
Blood Sedimentation
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Cholesterol - blood
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Risk
Smoking
Abstract
Risk factors for the development of stroke was studied in a prospective long-term investigation of 855 male in a random population sampled of the same age. After 13 years of follow-up 25 participants had suffered from stroke, which gives an incidence of 19/10,000 annually. At the 1963 year investigation several parametras were studied. The stroke-prone person had higher values of systolic and diastolic blood pressure and had a significant greater total heart volume. Blood parametras as the fasting of serum cholesterole, triglyceride and erytrocyte sedimentation rate were significantly elevated in those who developed stroke. They also tended to consume more coffee and showed a higher tobacco consumption. By applying the multiple regression model it was disclosed that the most predective risk-variables were diastolic blood pressure, erytrocyte sedimentation rate and smoking habits.
PubMed ID
298994 View in PubMed
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Age, education and occupation differentials in interregional migration: some evidence for Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256292
Source
Demography. 1971 May;8(2):195-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1971

Anterior chamber depth and primary angle-closure glaucoma. II. A genetic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5462
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1975 Jun;53(3):436-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1975
Author
P H Alsbirk
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1975 Jun;53(3):436-49
Date
Jun-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anterior Chamber - anatomy & histology
Biometry
Child
Comparative Study
Consanguinity
Female
Glaucoma - epidemiology - genetics
Greenland
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Abstract
The genetics of primary angle-closure glaucome (a.c.g.) was studied: a) through the prevalence in sibs and children of a.c.g. probands, and b) through the family distribution of the closely correlated axial anterior chamber depth (ACD). The material emerged from an epidemiologic study in Greeland Eskimos. a) Compared with the general population, the observed prevalence of a.c.g. was increased in sibs of a.c.g. probands and the estimated, future prevalence was found to be the same in sibs and children. Age influence prevented a proper Mendelian analysis, but no simple monogenic inheritance seems probable. b) The biometric study showed a relatively shallow chamber in sibs, children, nephews, nieces and grandchildren of a.c.g. probands. Regression analyses revealed a corresponding pattern, also in control families of probands with shallow chambers and in general population families. A heritability of 70% was found, indicating that about two thirds of the age and sex independent variation in ACD seems to be genetic.
PubMed ID
1174403 View in PubMed
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[Attempt at applying multistep correlation-regression analysis for the characterization of the impact of separate factors on the efficiency of dispensary care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74503
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1979;(10):29-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979

A comparison between predicted VO2 max from the Astrand procedure and the Canadian Home Fitness Test.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246862
Source
Can J Appl Sport Sci. 1979 Sep;4(3):214-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1979
Author
M. Jetté
Source
Can J Appl Sport Sci. 1979 Sep;4(3):214-8
Date
Sep-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Female
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oxygen consumption
Physical Exertion
Physical Fitness
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Sports Medicine
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare the predicted maximal oxygen concumption derived from the Canadian Home Fitness Test (CHFT) and the Astrand ergometer test to the observed VO2 max determined from a progressive multi-stage treadmill test. Sixty-four sedentary subjects (35 males and 29 females) ranging in age from 20 to 54 years participated in the study. The mean VO2 max measured on the treadmill for males and females was 34.6 +/- 6.0 ml/kg/min while the Astrand procedure predicted a mean VO2max of 29.6 +/- 6.5 ml/kg/min and the CHFT predicted a mean VO2 max of 34.8 +/- 5.0 ml/kg/min. Statistical analysis revealed a significant under-prediction (P less than 0.001) of the VO2 predicted by the Astrand test to the VO2 max derived from the treadmill test while there were no differences between the treadmill VO2max and that predicted by the CHFT. When the male and female values were analyzed separately, the same results were seen in the males. For the females, however, there were no significant differences among predicted and observed values. It concluded that the CHFT provided an adequate prediction of cardio-respiratory fitness as well as, if not superior to, the Astrand procedure.
PubMed ID
540416 View in PubMed
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Comparison of provincial surgical rates in 1968.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252738
Source
Can J Surg. 1975 Jan;18(1):18-9, 22-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1975
Author
E. Vayda
G D Anderson
Source
Can J Surg. 1975 Jan;18(1):18-9, 22-6
Date
Jan-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Appendectomy
Canada
Cataract Extraction
Female
General Surgery - manpower
Hospitals - supply & distribution - utilization
Humans
Insurance, Surgical
Male
Mastectomy
Orthopedics
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Statistics as Topic
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Tonsillectomy
Abstract
Studies have been made of age- and sex-adjusted 1968 provincial rates for individual surgical procedures. For elective and discretionary operations, such as tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy, hysterectomy, vein stripping and lens extraction, provincial rates varied by approximately 100 percent. Newfoundland, with few surgeons and hospital beds, had the lowest discretionary rates, and Alberta, which ranked hgih both for surgeons and hospital beds, the highest. Interprovincial differences were of smaller magnitude for non-discretionary surgery (radical mastectomy, cesarean section, colectomy., lobectomy, etc.). Ther were statistically significant correlations between numbers of surgeons and elective and discretionary surgical rates and between numbers of hospital beds and bed use in the provinces. The effect of disease prevalence on discretionary surgical rates was minimized because the rates were age- and sex-adjusted. Provincial organization of, and payment for, medical services has been similar. Hence, the ratio of surgical personnel to population in each province is postulated as a major determinant of the differing interprovincial rates.
PubMed ID
1120297 View in PubMed
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Comparison of respiratory variables in grain elevator workers and civic outside workers of Thunder Bay, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247536
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1979 Feb;119(2):193-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1979
Author
I. Broder
S. Mintz
M. Hutcheon
P. Corey
F. Silverman
G. Davies
A. Leznoff
L. Peress
P. Thomas
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1979 Feb;119(2):193-203
Date
Feb-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Cereals - adverse effects
Dust
Environmental Exposure
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology
Regression Analysis
Residual Volume
Respiration
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - physiopathology
Saskatchewan
Skin Tests
Smoking - physiopathology
Time Factors
Vital Capacity
Abstract
We compared respiratory variables in 441 grain elevator workers with 180 civic outside laborers in Thunder Bay. The grain handlers had a lower frequency of both positive skin reactions to pollens and molds and a family history of asthma, which suggests that they may have been self-selected for a decreased tendency to develop allergic respiratory disease. There was a higher frequency of cough and rales and a small decrease in forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one sec among the grain handlers, as compared to the civic workers matched for smoking. However, these differences between grain and nongrain workers were small in comparison to those between smokers and nonsmokers. There was no clear indication of a worsening of respiratory functions that could be attributed specifically to duration of employment as a grain elevator worker.
PubMed ID
434592 View in PubMed
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46 records – page 1 of 5.