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[Poisson's regression better than x2-test. Suicide frequency in Gotland as a basis for analysis of changes of rare events in a small group]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68360
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Jan 31;98(5):433-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-2001
Author
S E Johansson
Author Affiliation
sven-erik.johansson@klinvet.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Jan 31;98(5):433-6
Date
Jan-31-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Models, Statistical
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
11229086 View in PubMed
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[Equally good care of myocardial infarction in Sweden today. Geographic differences in mortality are without significance for the individual patient]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53204
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Jan 3-16;102(1-2):20-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
Juan Merlo
Anders Håkansson
Anders Beckman
Ulf Lindblad
Martin Lindström
Ulf-G Gerdtham
Lennart Råstam
Author Affiliation
Samhällsmedicinska institutionen, Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmö. juan.merlo@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Jan 3-16;102(1-2):20-3
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - therapy
Odds Ratio
Quality of Health Care
Regression Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
It is a known fact that the 1990s brought a decrease in mortality after myocardial infarction in Sweden but that differences in mortality rates following myocardial infarction still remain between the Swedish counties. Unresolved, however, are questions as to what these inter-county differences mean for the individual patient and what role hospital care plays in this context. We analysed all patients aged 64-85 years who were hospitalised following diagnosis of myocardial infarction in Sweden during the period 1993-1996. To gain an understanding of the relevance of geographical differences in mortality after myocardial infarction for the individual patient we applied multi-level regression analysis and calculated county and hospital median odds ratios (MORs) in relation to 28-day mortality. For hospitalised patients with myocardial infarction, being cared for in another hospital with higher mortality would increase the risk of dying by 9% (MOR = l.09) in men and 12% in women. If these patients moved to another county with higher mortality the risk would increase by 7% and 3%, respectively. The small geographical differences in 28-day mortality after myocardial infarction found in Sweden suggest a high degree of equality across the country; however, further improvement could be achieved in hospital care, especially for women--an issue that deserves further analysis.
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2005 Jan 3-16;102(1-2):9-1015707101
PubMed ID
15707102 View in PubMed
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[Prevalence of sport injuries, sport participation and drop out due to injury in young adults].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268709
Source
Laeknabladid. 2015 Oct;101(10):451-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Margrét H Indriðadóttir
�órarinn Sveinsson
Kristján �ór Magnússon
Sigurbjörn Árni Arngrímsson
Erlingur Jóhannsson
Source
Laeknabladid. 2015 Oct;101(10):451-6
Date
Oct-2015
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Athletic Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - therapy
Body Composition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Odds Ratio
Physical Fitness
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Young Adult
Youth Sports
Abstract
Sport participation has increased during the past few decades, with accompanying rise in sport injuries. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of sport injuries, and drop-out due to them along with possible risk factors (hours of sports participation, sex, age, aerobic fitness and body composition).
A retrospective, cross-sectional design was used and the 457 participants were 17 and 23 years old. Height, weight, body fat, lean soft tissue, bone mass, and aerobic fitness (W/kg) were measured. Participation in sports and physical training, and the prevalence of sport injuries and drop-out were estimated using questionnaires.
Four hundred and forty participants (96%) had at some time point participated in organized sports, but 277 (63%) were no longer practicing, more commonly (p=0.058) among girls (67.6%) than boys (58.8%). Thirty-seven (8.4%) dropped-out due to sport injuries. Of those participating in organized sports for the past 12 months, 51% required medical assistance at least once because of sport injuries. Multiple regression analysis revealed 5-fold increased risk for requiring medical assistance among those practicing more than 6 hours per week compared to those who practiced 6 hours or less (OR=5.30, 95% CI: 3.00 to 9.42).
Youth sport injuries are a significant problem that can cause drop-out from participation in sport. More research is needed to better understand the impact of risk factors in order to promote prevention and ensure evidence-based training.
PubMed ID
26444230 View in PubMed
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[Attitudes to food and eating in an Icelandic cohort].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279965
Source
Laeknabladid. 2016 Jul;102(7-8):332-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Olof Drofn Sigurbjornsdottir
Johanna Eyrun Torfadottir
Anna Sigridur Olafsdottir
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Source
Laeknabladid. 2016 Jul;102(7-8):332-8
Date
Jul-2016
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Body mass index
Choice Behavior
Feeding Behavior
Female
Food
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Healthy Lifestyle
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
Few studies exist on eating attitudes and well-being of adults in Iceland. In most Western societies great emphasis is placed on a lean and fit body, nevertheless the number of people gaining weigt keeps increasing. Such circumstances may cause discomfort related to food and food choice. The aim of this study was to examine attitudes towards food and eating among Icelandic adults.
We used data from the Icelandic national health survey of 5,861 adults, age 18-79, conducted in 2007. A numerical assessment tool for measuring eating attitude was established, based on answers to questions on eating attitude. We used binary regression models to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for unhealthy eating attitude according to different demographic factors.
The prevalence of unhealthy eating attitude according to the measurement tool used in the study was 17% among participants, 22% for women and 11% for men. Unhealthy eating attitude was most prevalent in the age-group 18-29 years (36% of women, 15% of men), among those dissatisfied with their body weight (35% of women, 22% of men) and among those defined as obese (38% of women, 23% of men).
Our data show that women are more prone to express unhealthy eating attitude compared to men. Those of younger age, with weight dissatisfaction and with high body mass index are positively associated with unhealthy eating attitude, irrespective of gender.
Diet, Dietary restraint, Public Health, Eating attitude, Body weight satisfaction. Correspondence: Laufey Steingrimsdottir, laufey@hi.is.
PubMed ID
27531852 View in PubMed
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