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Staff satisfaction with work, perceived quality of care and stress in elderly care: psychometric assessments and associations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76496
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2006 May;14(4):318-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Engström Maria
Ljunggren Brigitta
Lindqvist Ragny
Carlsson Marianne
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden. mem@hig.se
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2006 May;14(4):318-28
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Burnout, Professional - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Cooperative Behavior
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Geriatric Nursing - standards
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Morale
Motivation
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - organization & administration - psychology
Occupational Health
Psychometrics
Quality of Health Care - standards
Questionnaires - standards
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Support
Sweden
Workload
Workplace - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
AIMS: To evaluate validity and reliability of three questionnaires measuring 'work satisfaction', 'patient care' and 'staff health' for staff in elderly care and to study the relationship between staff members' satisfaction with work and perceived stress. BACKGROUND: Increased workload, difficulties in recruiting and retaining nurses are reported in elderly care. Valid and reliable instruments measuring staffs' perceptions of work are needed. METHODS: A convenience sample of 299 staff answered the questionnaires. RESULTS: Factor analysis of 'work satisfaction' gave eight factors, 'patient care' four factors and 'staff health' two factors, explaining 52.2%, 56.4% and 56.8% of the variance. Internal consistency was mostly satisfactory. Multiple regression analysis revealed a model that explained 41% of the variance in perceived stress symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: There was support for the instruments' validity and reliability. Older age, higher scores/satisfaction with workload, cooperation, expectations and demands, personal development and lower scores on internal motivation contributed to less stress.
PubMed ID
16629846 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of bladder dysfunction in Parkinsons disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76063
Source
Neurourol Urodyn. 2006;25(2):116-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Kristian Winge
Anne-Marie Skau
Hans Stimpel
Kurt K Nielsen
Lene Werdelin
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, H:S Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen NV, Denmark. k.winge@dadlnet.dk
Source
Neurourol Urodyn. 2006;25(2):116-22
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antiparkinson Agents - therapeutic use
Bladder Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Levodopa - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Parkinson Disease - complications
Prostatic Diseases - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Urodynamics - physiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in Parkinsons disease (PD) is reported as 27%-39% based on validated questionnaires which do not consider the degree of bother. To estimate the prevalence of LUTS in patients with PD, the severity of symptoms, the volume of postmicturitional urine, and to estimate differences compared to non-PD patients referred for urological evaluation. METHODS: One hundred seven patients with PD were evaluated using two sets of validated questionnaires (Dan-PSS and IPSS) about LUTS; postmicturitional residual urine was recorded, and compared to 61 patients without PD presenting at an urological clinic for examination. RESULTS: Bothersome LUTS measured using Dan-PSS scores correlated significantly with Hoehn and Yahr stage of disease (P = 0.02), but not with duration of disease or age. IPSS scores did not correlate to stage of disease, duration of disease or age. Two arbitrary cut-offs were applied, identifying patients with significant LUTS, Dan-PSS > 10 and IPSS > 10. There were no significant differences between the age or duration of disease of patients with and without significant LUTS. The most frequent symptom was nocturia (IPSS: 86%) followed by frequency (IPSS: 71%) and urgency (IPSS: 68%). The most frequently reported bothersome bladder symptom was urgency (Dan-PSS: 61%), followed by nocturia (Dan-PSS: 50%) and urge incontinence (Dan-PSS: 44%). The prevalence of bothersome frequency is low (Dan-PSS: 37%). The postmicturitional volumes (PMV) did not correlate to stage of disease, duration of disease or age, or to scores on questionnaires. Mean PMV was 34 ml. Seven patients (6%) with PD had a PMV larger then 100 ml. DISCUSSION: The prevalence of severe LUTS was similar with other studies, but the correlation between Dan-PSS and stage of disease, and not IPSS indicates that despite seeing no increase in frequency and severity of LUTS as PD progresses, patients find symptoms more bothersome. This may be due to progression in gait difficulties or a decreasing ability to separate and integrate sensory input, or both.
PubMed ID
16402391 View in PubMed
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General practitioners' adoption of new drugs and previous prescribing of drugs belonging to the same therapeutic class: a pharmacoepidemiological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76293
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2005 Nov;60(5):526-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Torben Dybdahl
Morten Andersen
Jakob Kragstrup
Ivar Sønbø Kristiansen
Jens Søndergaard
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of General Practice, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, J.B. Winsløws Vej. 9, DK-5000 Odense, Denmark.
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2005 Nov;60(5):526-33
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anti-Ulcer Agents - therapeutic use
Attitude of Health Personnel
Consumer Satisfaction
Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Denmark
Diffusion of Innovation
Drug Utilization
Family Practice - trends
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Omeprazole - therapeutic use
Physician's Practice Patterns - trends
Receptors, Angiotensin - antagonists & inhibitors
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tryptamines - therapeutic use
Abstract
AIM: To test the hypothesis that general practitioners (GPs) with high prescribing levels of certain drugs will adopt new drugs belonging to the same therapeutic group faster than those with low prescribing levels. METHODS: The adoption of four new drugs: esomeprazol, selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors, new triptans, and angiotensin-II receptor blockers were analysed using population-based prescription data. We used the preference proportion (prescriptions for new rather than older alternatives for the same indication) to measure GPs' adoption rate. Annual prescribing volume and prevalence were used to measure previous prescribing of older drug alternatives. We modelled the preference proportion using multiple linear regression analysis and the prescribing of older drugs as independent variables. We controlled for the GPs' general prescribing level and weighted for practice size. In the first three analyses, we dichotomized data using the median, lower and upper quartile as cut-off point. Next, we grouped data into quartiles and finally, we used continuous data. RESULTS: For esomeprazol and new triptans there was a higher preference for new drugs among "high prescribers", but only when this term was defined as the upper quarter and the upper half of previous prescribing levels, respectively (mean difference in preference proportion: 10.2% (99% confidence interval = 1.3%, 19.1%) and 8.2% (0.2%, 16.2%)). For the remaining two drug classes the associations were weak and almost all statistically nonsignificant. CONCLUSION: There is no consistent association between GPs' level of drug prescribing and their adoption of new drugs of the same therapeutic group.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2005 Nov;60(5):457-816236034
PubMed ID
16236043 View in PubMed
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Comparisons of total serum cholesterol and triglycerides between town and farm dwelling Icelandic youths

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76554
Source
Pages 268-275 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
  1 document  
Author
Way, A.
Axelsson, J.
Pétursdóttir, G.
Sigfússon, N.
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas
Source
Pages 268-275 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Date
1985
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Cardiovascular risk factors
Cholesterol
Multiple regression analysis
Triglycerides
Documents
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Minimum alcohol prices and outlet densities in British Columbia, Canada: estimated impacts on alcohol-attributable hospital admissions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114633
Source
Am J Public Health. 2013 Nov;103(11):2014-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Tim Stockwell
Jinhui Zhao
Gina Martin
Scott Macdonald
Kate Vallance
Andrew Treno
William Ponicki
Andrew Tu
Jane Buxton
Author Affiliation
Tim Stockwell, Jinhui Zhao, Gina Martin, Scott Macdonald, and Kate Vallance are with the Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia, University of Victoria, British Columbia. Tim Stockwell is also with the Department of Psychology, University of Victoria. Andrew Treno and William Ponicki are with the Prevention Research Center, Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, Berkeley, California. Andrew Tu and Jane Buxton are with the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver, British Columbia.
Source
Am J Public Health. 2013 Nov;103(11):2014-20
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Alcoholic Beverages - economics - supply & distribution
British Columbia - epidemiology
Commerce - economics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
We investigated whether periodic increases in minimum alcohol prices were associated with reduced alcohol-attributable hospital admissions in British Columbia.
The longitudinal panel study (2002-2009) incorporated minimum alcohol prices, density of alcohol outlets, and age- and gender-standardized rates of acute, chronic, and 100% alcohol-attributable admissions. We applied mixed-method regression models to data from 89 geographic areas of British Columbia across 32 time periods, adjusting for spatial and temporal autocorrelation, moving average effects, season, and a range of economic and social variables.
A 10% increase in the average minimum price of all alcoholic beverages was associated with an 8.95% decrease in acute alcohol-attributable admissions and a 9.22% reduction in chronic alcohol-attributable admissions 2 years later. A Can$ 0.10 increase in average minimum price would prevent 166 acute admissions in the 1st year and 275 chronic admissions 2 years later. We also estimated significant, though smaller, adverse impacts of increased private liquor store density on hospital admission rates for all types of alcohol-attributable admissions.
Significant health benefits were observed when minimum alcohol prices in British Columbia were increased. By contrast, adverse health outcomes were associated with an expansion of private liquor stores.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23597383 View in PubMed
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Time loss due to dental problems and treatment in the Canadian population: analysis of a nationwide cross-sectional survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114721
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2013;13:17
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Alyssa Hayes
Amir Azarpazhooh
Laura Dempster
Vahid Ravaghi
Carlos Quiñonez
Author Affiliation
Discipline of Dental Public Health, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. alyssa.hayes@mail.utoronto.ca
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2013;13:17
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Child
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care - economics - statistics & numerical data
Efficiency
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Sickness Impact Profile
Time Management
Tooth Diseases - economics
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to quantify time loss due to dental problems and treatment in the Canadian population, to identify factors associated with this time loss, and to provide information regarding the economic impacts of these issues.
Data from the 2007/09 Canadian Health Measures Survey were used. Descriptive analysis determined the proportion of those surveyed who reported time loss and the mean hours lost. Linear and logistic regressions were employed to determine what factors predicted hours lost and reporting time loss respectively. Productivity losses were estimated using the lost wages approach.
Over 40 million hours per year were lost due to dental problems and treatment, with a mean of 3.5 hours being lost per person. Time loss was more likely among privately insured and higher income earners. The amount of time loss was greater for higher income earners, and those who reported experiencing oral pain. Experiencing oral pain was the strongest predictor of reporting time loss and the amount of time lost.
This study has shown that, potentially, over 40 million hours are lost annually due to dental problems and treatment in Canada, with subsequent potential productivity losses of over $1 billion dollars. These losses are comparable to those experienced for other illnesses (e.g., musculoskeletal sprains). Further investigation into the underlying reasons for time loss, and which aspects of daily living are impacted by this time loss, are necessary for a fuller understanding of the policy implications associated with the economic impacts of dental problems and treatment in Canadian society.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23587069 View in PubMed
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Quality of sickness certification in primary health care: a retrospective database study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114727
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2013;14:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Ylva Skånér
Britt Arrelöv
Lars G Backlund
Magdalena Fresk
Amanda Waleh Aström
Gunnar H Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Centre for Family Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. ylva.skaner@ki.se
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2013;14:48
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Certification - standards
Electronic Health Records - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Physician's Practice Patterns
Primary Health Care - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Sick Leave - legislation & jurisprudence
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
In the period 2004-2009, national and regional initiatives were developed in Sweden to improve the quality of sickness certificates. Parameters for assessing the quality of sickness certificates in primary health care have been proposed. The aim of this study was to measure the quality of sickness certification in primary health care by means of assessing sickness certificates issued between 2004 and 2009 in Stockholm.
This was a retrospective study using data retrieved from sickness certificates contained in the electronic patient records of 21 primary health care centres in Stockholm County covering six consecutive years. A total number of 236 441 certificates were used in the current study. Seven quality parameters were chosen as outcome measures. Descriptive statistics and regression models with time, sex and age group as explanatory variables were used.
During the study period, the quality of the sickness certification practice improved as the number of days on first certification decreased and the proportion of duly completely and acceptable certificates increased. Assessment of need for vocational rehabilitation and giving a prognosis for return to work were not significantly improved during the same period. Time was the most influential variable.
The quality of sickness certification practice improved for most of the parameters, although additional efforts to improve the quality of sickness certificates are needed. Measures, such as reminders, compulsory certificate fields and structured guidance, could be useful tools to achieve this objective.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23586694 View in PubMed
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The occurrence of adverse events in relation to time after registration for coronary artery bypass surgery: a population-based observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114810
Source
J Cardiothorac Surg. 2013;8:74
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Boris G Sobolev
Guy Fradet
Lisa Kuramoto
Basia Rogula
Author Affiliation
The University of British Columbia, 828 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1M9, Canada. boris.sobolev@ubc.ca
Source
J Cardiothorac Surg. 2013;8:74
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - surgery
Emergency Medicine
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Preoperative Period
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Waiting Lists - mortality
Abstract
Our objective was to evaluate the effect of delays on adverse events while waiting for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).
An observational study that prospectively followed patients from registration on a wait list to removal for planned surgery, death while waiting, or unplanned emergency surgery. The population-based registry provided data on 12,030 patients with a record of registration on a wait list for first-time isolated CABG surgery between 1992 and 2005.
In total, 104 patients died and 382 patients underwent an emergency surgery before planned CABG. The death rate was 0.5 per 1000 patient-weeks in the semiurgent group and 0.6 per 1000 patient-weeks the nonurgent group, adjusted OR?=?1.07 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.69-1.65). The emergency surgery rate of 1.2 per 1000 patient-weeks in the nonurgent group was lower compared to 2.1 per 1000 patient-weeks in the semiurgent group (adjusted OR?=?0.72, 95% CI 0.54-0.97). However, the nonurgent group had a greater cumulative incidence of preoperative death than the semiurgent group for almost all weeks on the wait list, adjusted OR?=?1.92 (95% CI 1.25-2.95). The surgery rate was 1.2 per 1000 patient-weeks in the nonurgent group and 2.1 per 1000 patient-weeks in the semiurgent group, adjusted OR?=?0.72 (95% CI 0.54-0.97). The cumulative incidence of emergency surgery before planned CABG was similar in the semiurgent and nonurgent groups, adjusted OR?=?0.88, (95% CI 0.64-1.20).
Despite similar death rates in the semiurgent and nonurgent groups, the longer waiting times in the nonurgent group result in a greater cumulative incidence of death on the wait list compared to that in the semiurgent group. These longer waiting times also offset the lower rate of emergency surgery before planned admission in the nonurgent group so that the cumulative incidence of the emergency surgery was similar in both groups.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23577641 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of metabolic syndrome one year after delivery in Finnish women at increased risk for gestational diabetes mellitus during pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114814
Source
J Pregnancy. 2013;2013:139049
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jatta Puhkala
Tarja I Kinnunen
Tommi Vasankari
Katriina Kukkonen-Harjula
Jani Raitanen
Riitta Luoto
Author Affiliation
UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland. jatta.puhkala@uta.fi
Source
J Pregnancy. 2013;2013:139049
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cholesterol, HDL - metabolism
Diabetes, Gestational - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at increased risk for metabolic syndrome (MeS) after delivery. We studied the prevalence of MeS at one year postpartum among Finnish women who in early pregnancy were at increased risk of developing GDM.
This follow-up study is a part of a GDM prevention trial. At one year postpartum, 150 women (mean age 33.1 years, BMI 27.2?kg/m(2)) were evaluated for MeS.
The prevalence of MeS was 18% according tothe International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria and 16% according toNational Cholestrol Education Program (NCEP) criteria. Of MeS components, 74% of participants had an increased waist circumference (=80?cm). Twenty-seven percent had elevated fasting plasma glucose (=5.6?mmol/L), and 29% had reduced HDL cholesterol (=1.3?mmol/L). The odds ratio for the occurrence of MeS at one year postpartum was 3.0 (95% CI 1.0-9.2) in those who were overweight before pregnancy compared to normal weight women.
Nearly one-fifth of the women with an increased risk of GDM in early pregnancy fulfilled the criteria of MeS at one year postpartum. The most important factor associated with MeS was prepregnancy overweight. Weight management before and during pregnancy is important for preventing MeS after delivery.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23577256 View in PubMed
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Quality of life (QOL) of older adult community choral singers in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114838
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2013 Jul;25(7):1055-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Julene K Johnson
Jukka Louhivuori
Anita L Stewart
Asko Tolvanen
Leslie Ross
Pertti Era
Author Affiliation
Institute for Health & Aging, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. julene.johnson@ucsf.edu
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2013 Jul;25(7):1055-64
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Residence Characteristics
Singing
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
World Health Organization
Abstract
Enhancing quality of life (QOL) of older adults is an international area of focus. Identifying factors and experiences that contribute to QOL of older adults helps promote optimal levels of functioning. This study examines the relationship between perceived benefits associated with choral singing and QOL among community-dwelling older adults.
One hundred seventeen older adults who sing in community choirs in Jyv?skyl?, Finland, completed self-report measures of QOL (WHOQOL-Bref), depressive symptoms, and a questionnaire about the benefits of singing in choir. Correlational analyses and linear regression models were used to examine the association between the benefits of singing in choir and QOL.
Both correlation and regression analyses found significant relationships between the benefits of choral singing and three QOL domains: psychological, social relationships, and environment. These associations remained significant after adjusting for age and depressive symptoms. As hypothesized, older choral singers who reported greater benefits of choir singing had higher QOL in multiple domains. The older choral singers in the study also reported few symptoms of depression and high overall QOL and satisfaction with health.
Results suggest that singing in a community choir as an older adult may positively influence several aspects of QOL. These results suggest that community choral singing may be one potential avenue for promoting QOL in older adults.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23574947 View in PubMed
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