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Discovering carcinogens in the occupational environment. Methods of data collection and analysis of a large case-referent monitoring system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234410
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1987 Dec;13(6):486-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1987
Author
J. Siemiatycki
S. Wacholder
L. Richardson
R. Dewar
M. Gérin
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine Research Center, Institute Armant-Frappier, Laval-des-Rapides, Québec, Canada.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1987 Dec;13(6):486-92
Date
Dec-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinogens, Environmental - isolation & purification
Data Collection - methods
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - chemically induced
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Abstract
A multi-cancer site, multi-factor, case-referent study was undertaken to generate hypotheses about possible occupational carcinogens. About 20 types of cancer were included. Incident cases among men aged 35-70 years and diagnosed in any of the major Montreal hospitals were eligible. Probing interviews were carried out for 3 726 eligible cases. The interview was designed to obtain detailed lifetime job histories and information on potential confounders. Each job history was reviewed by a team of chemists who translated it into a history of occupational exposures. These occupational exposures were then analyzed as potential risk factors in relation to the sites of cancer included. For each site of cancer analyzed, referents were selected from among the other sites in the study. The analysis was carried out in stages. First a Mantel-Haenszel analysis was undertaken of all cancer-substance associations, stratifying on a limited number of covariates, and, then, for those associations which were noteworthy in the initial analysis, a logistic regression analysis was made taking into account all potential confounders. This report describes the fieldwork and analytical methods.
PubMed ID
3433050 View in PubMed
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Leisure-time physical activity is inversely related to risk factors for coronary heart disease in middle-aged Finnish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234626
Source
Eur Heart J. 1987 Oct;8(10):1047-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1987
Author
J. Tuomilehto
B. Marti
J T Salonen
E. Virtala
T. Lahti
P. Puska
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Epidemiology, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1987 Oct;8(10):1047-55
Date
Oct-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Coronary Disease - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Finland
Humans
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Exertion
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
Coronary risk factors and levels of physical activity at leisure were measured in a random sample of 3975 men 25-64 years of age residing in four areas of Finland. An index of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) as the product of weekly exercise sessions times their usual intensity (expressed as metabolic equivalents) was computed. It showed a graded, inverse association with mean arterial blood pressure, smoking and serum thiocyanate, coronary heart disease risk estimate (combining blood pressure, total cholesterol and smoking), and a nonlinear favorable association with serum lipoproteins. In multiple regression analysis, LTPA contributed significantly and independently to the variation in mean arterial pressure; the standardized regression coefficients were -0.06 for LTPA, 0.09 for weekly alcohol consumption, 0.25 for body mass index, 0.25 for age. In the regression of coronary risk estimate, the standardized regression coefficients were -0.19 for LTPA, 0.22 for weekly alcohol consumption, 0.09 for body mass index, 0.15 for age. There was no evidence that LTPA above 2000 kcal of weekly energy expenditure was associated with further reduced coronary risk factor levels. These findings thus support the inverse direction of the association between exercise and coronary risk factors but they also point towards an independent, but modest, role of leisure-time physical activity as a determinant of coronary risk estimate and blood pressure.
PubMed ID
3500045 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen and antibody (hepatitis B virus markers) in personnel at a children's hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234795
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1987 Sep;126(3):480-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1987
Author
S M King
D A Jarvis
J. Shaw
H S Shannon
P J Middleton
R. Gold
E L Ford-Jones
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1987 Sep;126(3):480-3
Date
Sep-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Hepatitis B - transmission
Hepatitis B Antibodies - analysis
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - analysis
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Ontario
Personnel, Hospital
Regression Analysis
Risk
Abstract
After two cases of acute hepatitis B infection occurred in phlebotomists at The Hospital for Sick Children in 1985, a seroprevalence survey of hepatitis B virus markers was undertaken. Directors in high-risk areas were advised by phone and memorandum to screen employees. Participation was entirely voluntary, and employees who did not respond were contacted six weeks after initial notification. Information obtained from each participant through a self-administered questionnaire included age, duration of employment in current pediatric occupation, history of blood transfusions, immune globulin prophylaxis, needlestick injury, and country of birth (North America/United Kingdom or other). Sera identified by code were tested by radioimmunoassay. Interactions were analyzed by using a multiple logistic regression model. A total of 10% of the personnel in high-risk areas, in which there was frequent exposure to blood or blood products, had hepatitis B markers in their blood, compared with 2% who did not have this exposure. Birthplace and occupation have independently significant effects on the likelihood of having hepatitis B markers. There appears to be an increased risk to employees in pediatric units, depending on the patient (and parent) population being served, although the risk may be lower than in adult hospitals.
PubMed ID
3618579 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and hospital admissions in Southern Ontario: the acid summer haze effect.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234915
Source
Environ Res. 1987 Aug;43(2):317-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1987
Author
D V Bates
R. Sizto
Source
Environ Res. 1987 Aug;43(2):317-31
Date
Aug-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Air Pollution
Humans
Ontario
Patient Admission
Regression Analysis
Seasons
Weather
Abstract
Air pollution data from 17 sampling stations between Windsor and Peterborough in Southern Ontario, for January, February, July, and August in 1974 and 1976 to 1983, have been analyzed. Each station reported O3, NO3, SO2, and the coefficient of haze (COH) every hour and aerosol sulfates for a 24-hr period every sixth day using glass-fiber filters. Data on mean daily temperature and relative humidity for the region were also recorded. It is shown that there are high correlations between different pollutants and between these and temperature in the summer. In the summer, sulfate levels were significantly correlated with relative humidity. In winter, the highest correlation was between COH and NO2. Over the 9-year period, SO2 levels in both winter and summer have fallen considerably; there have been no significant trends in O3, NO3, or COH data. Aerosol sulfates increased between 1976 and 1980 in both summer and winter and have since declined slightly. Hospital admission data for the 79 acute care hospitals serving the region, which contains about 5.9 million people, have been analyzed on a daily basis for the same months of the same years. Total admissions and total respiratory admissions have declined about 15% over the period, but asthma admissions appear to have risen. The asthma category of admissions is complicated by the effects of a change in ICD coding in 1979. It has been shown that significant correlations exist between O3, SO4, SO2, and temperature, on the one hand, and deviations from the mean respiratory admissions for that day of the week, for that season, for that year, on the other. These correlations exist if asthma is excluded from the diagnoses. In winter, asthma admissions are correlated with temperature only. A group of nonrespiratory conditions showed no correlations with air pollutants in winter or summer. Stepwise multiple regression analysis based on each year considered individually indicates that in summer SO4 and temperature account for about 5% of the variance in respiratory or asthma admissions. It is shown that the mean of the hourly ozone maxima has a high correlation with the maximal 8-hr average for ozone, and that using this index instead of the mean of the hourly maxima does not increase the correlation coefficient with respiratory disease. Another analysis has been performed by grouping the hospitals and sampling stations into nine separate regions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
PubMed ID
3608935 View in PubMed
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Restenosis after successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty: the Montreal Heart Institute experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234954
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1987 Jul 31;60(3):50B-55B
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-31-1987
Author
P. Guiteras Val
M G Bourassa
P R David
R. Bonan
J. Crépeau
I. Dyrda
J. Lespérance
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1987 Jul 31;60(3):50B-55B
Date
Jul-31-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Balloon
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Disease - radiography - therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Recurrence
Regression Analysis
Risk
Time Factors
Abstract
Repeat coronary angiography was performed within 6 months after successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) in 178 of our first 181 patients (98%). The remaining 3 patients were symptom free, had negative treadmill exercise test results and were considered not to have had restenosis. A second follow-up angiogram was performed in 107 patients (59%), including all patients with persistent or recurrent anginal symptoms, between 7 and 18 months after PTCA. Fifty-one of the 181 patients (28%) had restenosis on 51 of 205 successfully dilated segments (25%). The stenosis was greater than or equal to 70% in 49 of these 51 segments; it was 65% and 55%, respectively, in the 2 remaining patients. Restenosis was documented angiographically at a median time of 4.7 +/- 4 months. However, 47 patients (92%) had restenosis documented within 6 months, 2 between 7 and 12 months and 2 between 13 and 18 months after PTCA. Stepwise logistic regression analysis selected the following factors as independent predictors of restenosis after PTCA: variant angina, multivessel disease, severity of residual stenosis and less reduction in the diameter of the stenosis on the angiogram immediately after PTCA. Of these 4 factors, the degree of residual stenosis immediately after PTCA was by far the most significant. It is concluded that restenosis occurs in approximately 25% of patients, almost always within the first 6 months, after successful PTCA. The degree of residual stenosis after PTCA is the most important predictor of restenosis. Increased experience and improved instrumentation may eventually lead to less residual stenosis and better late results after PTCA.
PubMed ID
2956844 View in PubMed
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The determinants of hospital utilization under a universal public insurance program in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234979
Source
Med Care. 1987 Jul;25(7):658-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1987
Author
P. Manga
R W Broyles
D E Angus
Author Affiliation
Masters Program in Health Administration, University of Ottawa.
Source
Med Care. 1987 Jul;25(7):658-70
Date
Jul-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Female
Health Resources - supply & distribution
Health services needs and demand
Hospitals - utilization
Humans
Insurance, Health
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs
Population Surveillance
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This study employs the individual as the unit of analysis to examine the relative importance of medical need, sociodemographic and economic factors in determining the use or non-use of hospital care and the volume of service consumed by those who experienced an episode of hospitalization during the study period. The data were derived from the Canada Health Survey which is a stratified, multistaged sample of the entire population. The results of the discriminant and weighted regression analyses indicate that the use or non-use of hospital care and the volume of service consumed are largely determined by medical need and not by income. The findings are supportive of the view that the national health insurance scheme in Canada has resulted in a more equitable distribution of hospital care.
PubMed ID
3695668 View in PubMed
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The association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 concentration and risk of disease death in men: modification by magnesium intake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263529
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Apr;30(4):343-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Jaakko Mursu
Tarja Nurmi
Sari Voutilainen
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Jyrki K Virtanen
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Apr;30(4):343-7
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Calcifediol - blood - deficiency
Cause of Death
Chromatography, Liquid
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Magnesium - administration & dosage - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood
Abstract
Low vitamin D status increases the risk of death. Magnesium plays an essential role in vitamin D metabolism and low magnesium intake may predispose to vitamin D deficiency and potentiate the health problems. We investigated whether magnesium intake modifies the serum 25(OH)D3 concentration and its associations with mortality in middle-aged and older men. We included 1892 men aged 42-60 years without cardiovascular disease or cancer at baseline in 1984-1989 from the prospective, population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study. Serum 25(OH)D3 was measured with the high-performance liquid chromatography using coulometric electrode array detection. Magnesium intake was assessed with 4-day food recording. Deaths were ascertained by a computer linkage to the national cause of death register. Deaths due accidents and suicides were excluded. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to analyze the associations. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for death in the lowest (49.4 nmol/L) serum 25(OH)D3 tertile was 1.31 (95 % CI 1.07-1.60, Ptrend = 0.01). Stratified by the magnesium intake, the higher risk was observed only in the lower magnesium intake median (
PubMed ID
25762172 View in PubMed
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Factors associated with time consumption when answering drug-related queries to Scandinavian drug information centres: a multi-centre study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263819
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2014 Nov;70(11):1395-401
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Linda Amundstuen Reppe
Olav Spigset
Ylva Böttiger
Hanne Rolighed Christensen
Jens Peter Kampmann
Per Damkier
Stian Lydersen
Jan Schjøtt
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2014 Nov;70(11):1395-401
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Drug Information Services - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Personnel
Humans
Information Centers - statistics & numerical data
Male
Norway
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
There is little research-based documentation on the services provided by drug information centres (DICs). The aim of this multi-centre study was to explore for the first time the factors associated with time consumption when answering drug-related queries at eight different but comparable DICs.
During an 8-week period, staff members at eight Scandinavian DICs recorded the number of minutes during which they responded to queries. Mixed model linear regression analyses were used to explore the factors associated with time consumption when answering queries.
The mean time consumption per query was 178 min (range 4-2540 min). The mean time consumed per query increased by 28 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 23 to 33, p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
25213372 View in PubMed
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Risk factors for suicidal behaviour in individuals on disability pension due to common mental disorders - a nationwide register-based prospective cohort study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263871
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(5):e98497
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Syed Rahman
Kristina Alexanderson
Jussi Jokinen
Ellenor Mittendorfer-Rutz
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(5):e98497
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Disability Evaluation
Female
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Male
Mental Disorders - complications - economics
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Pensions
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Common mental disorders (CMD) have become one of the leading causes for disability pension (DP). Studies on predictors of adverse health outcome following DP are sparse. This study aimed to examine the association of different socio-demographic factors and health care consumption with subsequent suicidal behaviour among individuals on DP due to CMD.
This is a population-based prospective cohort study based on register data. All individuals aged 18-64 years, living in Sweden on 31-Dec-2004 who in 2005 were on DP due to CMD (N?=?46 745) were followed regarding suicide attempt and suicide (2006-10). Univariate and multivariate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for suicidal behaviour were estimated by Cox regression.
During the five-year follow-up, 1 046 (2.2%) and 210 (0.4%) individuals attempted and committed suicide, respectively. Multivariate analyses showed that young age (18-24 years) and low education predicted suicide attempt, while living alone was associated with both higher suicide attempt and suicide (range of HRs 1.23 to 1.68). Combined prescription of antidepressants with anxiolytics during 2005 and inpatient care due to mental diagnoses or suicide attempt (2001-05) were strongly associated with suicide attempt and suicide (range of HRs 1.3 to 4.9), while inpatient care due to somatic diagnoses and specialized outpatient care due to mental diagnoses during 2001-05 only predicted suicide attempt (HR 1.45; 95% CI: 1.3-1.7; HR 1.30; 95% CI: 1.1-1.7).
Along with socio-demographic factors, it is very important to consider type of previous healthcare use and medication history when designing further research or intervention aiming at individuals on DP due to CMD. Further research is warranted to investigate both characteristics of disability pension due to CMD, like duration, diagnoses and grade as well as mechanisms to subsequent suicidal behavior, taking potential gender differences into consideration.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24869674 View in PubMed
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Education-related differences in physical performance after age 60: a cross-sectional study assessing variation by age, gender and occupation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264158
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:641
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anna-Karin Welmer
Ingemar Kåreholt
Elisabeth Rydwik
Sara Angleman
Hui-Xin Wang
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:641
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Hand Strength
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Physical Fitness
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Sweden
Walking
Abstract
Having a low level of education has been associated with worse physical performance. However, it is unclear whether this association varies by age, gender or the occupational categories of manual and non-manual work. This study examined whether there are education-related differences across four dimensions of physical performance by age, gender or occupational class and to what extent chronic diseases and lifestyle-related factors may explain such differences.
Participants were a random sample of 3212 people, 60 years and older, both living in their own homes and in institutions, from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care, in Kungsholmen, Stockholm. Trained nurses assessed physical performance in grip strength, walking speed, balance and chair stands, and gathered data on education, occupation and lifestyle-related factors, such as physical exercise, body mass index, smoking and alcohol consumption. Diagnoses of chronic diseases were made by the examining physician.
Censored normal regression analyses showed that persons with university education had better grip strength, balance, chair stand time and walking speed than people with elementary school education. The differences in balance and walking speed remained statistically significant (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
23842209 View in PubMed
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4654 records – page 1 of 466.