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661 records – page 1 of 67.

[4-year experiences with computer-assisted registration of postoperative wound infections and identification of risk factors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226352
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 13;153(20):1416-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-13-1991
Author
A. Bremmelgaard
A M Sørensen
E. Brems-Dalgaard
D. Raahave
J V Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Frederiksberg Hospital, klinisk mikrobiologisk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 13;153(20):1416-9
Date
May-13-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automatic Data Processing
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Surgical Wound Infection - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
A continuous record of postoperative surgical infections was carried out by electronic data processing of 9,181 orthopaedic and general operations. The overall infection rate was 5.7%, ranging from 2.0% (clean wounds) to 22.1% (dirty wounds). The corresponding deep infection rates were 1.7%, 0.4% and 5.4%, respectively. Employing a multiple logistic regression analysis, ten risk factors were evaluated. Factors found to be significant for both departments were: wound contamination, duration of operation and age. In addition, in the department of orthopaedic surgery: date of operation and surgeon, and in the department of general surgery: planning of operation, length of preoperative stay and anatomic groups. Sex had no influence on postoperative infection. Significant factors altered during the four years. Postoperative stay was, on an average, 13.9 days longer in infected patients.
PubMed ID
2028549 View in PubMed
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[4 years of experiences with Karbase. A tool for quality development in vascular surgery].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216878
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Nov 21;156(47):7032-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-21-1994
Author
L P Jensen
T V Schroeder
J E Lorentzen
P V Madsen
Author Affiliation
Karkirurgisk afdeling, Rigshospitalet, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Nov 21;156(47):7032-5
Date
Nov-21-1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Registries
Risk factors
Surgical Wound Infection - epidemiology
Vascular Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Karbase, a Danish register for vascular surgery is presented with data from four years experience. The register consists of 65 variables centered on risk factors, the perioperative course as well as follow-up information. During the four-year period 1989-1992 a total of 4902 admissions were registered in 3810 patients. Surgery was performed during 4005 admissions. Output data from Karbase is presented with results on survival and postoperative complications, related to preoperative risk factors. The incidence of surgical wound infections was 3.9%, with a significant reduction during the years (p = 0.004). Karbase is now used by all vascular surgical units in Denmark. We conclude that the establishment of a continuous registration has been beneficial to the department. We have achieved valid data on treatment, outcome and complications in relation to individual risk factors. In the future the use of Karbase will be extended with the aim of further quality development, locally as well as nation wide.
PubMed ID
7817410 View in PubMed
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[10-year follow-up study of mortality among users of hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179879
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Apr 26;166(18):1679-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-2004

[Accelerated versus conventional hospital stay in total hip and knee arthroplasty III: patient satisfaction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81877
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 May 29;168(22):2148-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-29-2006
Author
Husted Henrik
Hansen Hans Christian
Holm Gitte
Bach-Dal Charlotte
Rud Kirsten
Andersen Kristoffer Lande
Kehlet Henrik
Author Affiliation
H:S Hvidovre Hospital, Ortopaedkirurgisk Afdeling, Hvidovre. henrikhusted@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 May 29;168(22):2148-51
Date
May-29-2006
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Comorbidity
Denmark
Early Ambulation
Female
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Patient satisfaction
Questionnaires
Registries
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The goal of this study was to evaluate patient satisfaction with the hospital stay in relation to the length of stay for patients operated on with primary total hip- and knee-arthroplasty (THA and TKA). MATERIALS AND METHODS: According to the National Register on Patients, the three departments with the shortest and the three departments with the longest postoperative hospital stay at the end of 2003 were chosen for evaluation. The patients, operated on with THA or TKA from September 2004 to April 2005, from the selected departments answered a questionnaire regarding satisfaction with elected parts of their stay, co-morbidity, sex and age. RESULTS: The patients from the departments with the shortest stay were not younger nor had they less co-morbidities than patients from departments with longer stays. Apart from staying a significantly shorter time, they were either as satisfied--or sometimes more satisfied--with all parts of their stay compared to patients from the departments with longer hospital stay. CONCLUSION: Patients in accelerated stays are not less satisfied with their hospital stay (or any part of it) compared to patients with longer and more conventional hospital stays. These results support the implementation of fast-track total hip- and knee arthroplasty.
PubMed ID
16768952 View in PubMed
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[Accelerated versus conventional hospital stay in total hip and knee arthroplasty II: organizational and clinical differences].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168857
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 May 29;168(22):2144-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-29-2006
Author
Henrik Husted
Hans Christian Hansen
Gitte Holm
Charlotte Bach-Dal
Kirsten Rud
Kristoffer Lande Andersen
Henrik Kehlet
Author Affiliation
H:S Hvidovre Hospital, Ortopaedkirurgisk Afdeling, Hvidovre. henrikhusted@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 May 29;168(22):2144-8
Date
May-29-2006
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - nursing - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - nursing - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Early Ambulation - statistics & numerical data
Focus Groups
Hospital Departments - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Length of Stay
Orthopedics - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns
Registries
Abstract
The goal of this study was to evaluate hospital stays for patients operated on with primary total hip- and knee-arthroplasty (THA and TKA) in order to identify important logistical and clinical areas for the duration of the hospital stay.
According to the National Register on Patients, the three departments with the shortest and the three departments with the longest postoperative hospital stay at the end of 2003 were chosen for evaluation. This took place from late 2004 to mid 2005, and all written material and 25 journals from each department were evaluated, and interviews with the heads of the departments as well as the staff were conducted. The logistical set-up and the clinical treatment/pathway were examined in an attempt to identify logistical and clinical factors acting as improvements or barriers for quick rehabilitation and subsequent discharge.
Departments with short hospital stay were characterised by both logistical (homogenous entities, regular staff, high continuity, using more time on and up-to-date information including expectations of a short stay, functional discharge criteria) and clinical features (multi-modal pain treatment, early mobilization and discharge when criteria were met) facilitating quick rehabilitation and discharge.
Implementation of logistical and clinical features, as shown in this study in all departments, are expected to increase rehabilitation and reduce the length of hospital stay.
PubMed ID
16768951 View in PubMed
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[Accident registration at emergency departments].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187696
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Oct 28;164(44):5152-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-28-2002

[Accidents in day care institutions in Denmark during the 1990's]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32303
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Feb 19;163(8):1078-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-19-2001
Author
M. Kruse
Author Affiliation
Statens Institut for Folkesundhed, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Feb 19;163(8):1078-82
Date
Feb-19-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Child Day Care Centers - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Injury Severity Score
Male
Nurseries - statistics & numerical data
Play and Playthings - injuries
Registries
Sex Factors
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: This paper analyses the development in the incidence of injuries in day care institutions for children below school age in Denmark 1989-1997. MATERIAL: Data on injuries were collected from the injury register, which covers around 15 per cent of the Danish population. The population data derive from Statistics Denmark. METHOD: Incidence patterns were analysed by means of linear regressions and comparisons of means. RESULTS: Injuries in day care institutions for children below school age have increased sharply during the 1990s. In children aged 1-6, the 3-6-year-olds had a higher incidence and the boys a significantly higher incidence of injury than the girls. DISCUSSION: The increase in injuries is to some extent explained by a higher attendance at day care institutions. The hypothesis that the rising incidence is partly due to an increase in the tendency to seek emergency department treatment in the event of minor injuries cannot be ruled out, as minor injuries almost solely account for the rise.
PubMed ID
11242666 View in PubMed
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[Accumulated microbiological data. Surveillance of infection/antibiotic policy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230457
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Jul 24;151(30):1934-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-24-1989
Author
J K Møller
P. Bülow
O J Bergmann
J. Ellegaard
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Jul 24;151(30):1934-7
Date
Jul-24-1989
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology
Computers
Denmark
Drug Utilization
Hospital Departments
Humans
Registries
Abstract
Database reviews of the findings in bacteriological specimens from a period of six years from patients in a department of haematology are employed as a model of how cumulative data about the microorganisms isolated may be employed for surveillance of accumulated infections and in the organization of the antibiotic policy of a department. During the period of observation, the standard treatment with antibiotics for febrile episodes in granulocytopenic patients was altered to piperacillin and netilimicin on the basis of the frequent occurrence of Gram-negative rods including Pseudomonas aeruginosa in blood cultures. It is concluded that accumulated microbiological data is of value for a clinical department and that analysis of the data does not constitute an increased work-load provided that the microbiological reports are routinely registered in a database.
PubMed ID
2781653 View in PubMed
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[A comparative analysis of the notification of occupational disease in Denmark and Norway].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature255377
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1972 Aug 21;134(34):1807-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-21-1972
Author
L. Scocozza
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1972 Aug 21;134(34):1807-12
Date
Aug-21-1972
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Humans
Norway
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Registries
PubMed ID
5051935 View in PubMed
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661 records – page 1 of 67.