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[1,4 millions Swedes are on the donation registry. Still several thousands newly registered persons per month].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208386
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 May 28;94(22):2105-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-28-1997
Author
H. Gäbel
N. Rehnqvist
B. Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Transplantationskirurgiska kliniken, Huddinge sjukhus, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 May 28;94(22):2105-8
Date
May-28-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Public Opinion
Registries
Sweden
Tissue Donors
Tissue and Organ Procurement - statistics & numerical data
PubMed ID
9213668 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 1% of the population accountable for 63% of all violent crime convictions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259131
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;49(4):559-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Falk, O
Wallinius, M
Lundström, S
Frisell, T
Anckarsäter, H
Kerekes, N
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;49(4):559-71
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aggression - psychology
Criminals - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Population-based studies on violent crime and background factors may provide an understanding of the relationships between susceptibility factors and crime. We aimed to determine the distribution of violent crime convictions in the Swedish population 1973-2004 and to identify criminal, academic, parental, and psychiatric risk factors for persistence in violent crime.
The nationwide multi-generation register was used with many other linked nationwide registers to select participants. All individuals born in 1958-1980 (2,393,765 individuals) were included. Persistent violent offenders (those with a lifetime history of three or more violent crime convictions) were compared with individuals having one or two such convictions, and to matched non-offenders. Independent variables were gender, age of first conviction for a violent crime, nonviolent crime convictions, and diagnoses for major mental disorders, personality disorders, and substance use disorders.
A total of 93,642 individuals (3.9%) had at least one violent conviction. The distribution of convictions was highly skewed; 24,342 persistent violent offenders (1.0% of the total population) accounted for 63.2% of all convictions. Persistence in violence was associated with male sex (OR 2.5), personality disorder (OR 2.3), violent crime conviction before age 19 (OR 2.0), drug-related offenses (OR 1.9), nonviolent criminality (OR 1.9), substance use disorder (OR 1.9), and major mental disorder (OR 1.3).
The majority of violent crimes are perpetrated by a small number of persistent violent offenders, typically males, characterized by early onset of violent criminality, substance abuse, personality disorders, and nonviolent criminality.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24173408 View in PubMed
Less detail

[2 years of the Swedish pacemaker registry: a certain centralization of activities can be appropriate].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223959
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Apr 15;89(16):1380-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1992
Author
R. Nordlander
K. Pehrsson
L. Rydén
A. Bocray
Author Affiliation
kardiologiska kliniken, Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Apr 15;89(16):1380-2
Date
Apr-15-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiology - economics - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Pacemaker, Artificial - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Registries - standards - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
PubMed ID
1579008 View in PubMed
Less detail

[4-year experiences with computer-assisted registration of postoperative wound infections and identification of risk factors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226352
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 13;153(20):1416-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-13-1991
Author
A. Bremmelgaard
A M Sørensen
E. Brems-Dalgaard
D. Raahave
J V Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Frederiksberg Hospital, klinisk mikrobiologisk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 13;153(20):1416-9
Date
May-13-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automatic Data Processing
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Surgical Wound Infection - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
A continuous record of postoperative surgical infections was carried out by electronic data processing of 9,181 orthopaedic and general operations. The overall infection rate was 5.7%, ranging from 2.0% (clean wounds) to 22.1% (dirty wounds). The corresponding deep infection rates were 1.7%, 0.4% and 5.4%, respectively. Employing a multiple logistic regression analysis, ten risk factors were evaluated. Factors found to be significant for both departments were: wound contamination, duration of operation and age. In addition, in the department of orthopaedic surgery: date of operation and surgeon, and in the department of general surgery: planning of operation, length of preoperative stay and anatomic groups. Sex had no influence on postoperative infection. Significant factors altered during the four years. Postoperative stay was, on an average, 13.9 days longer in infected patients.
PubMed ID
2028549 View in PubMed
Less detail

[4 years of experiences with Karbase. A tool for quality development in vascular surgery].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216878
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Nov 21;156(47):7032-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-21-1994
Author
L P Jensen
T V Schroeder
J E Lorentzen
P V Madsen
Author Affiliation
Karkirurgisk afdeling, Rigshospitalet, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Nov 21;156(47):7032-5
Date
Nov-21-1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Registries
Risk factors
Surgical Wound Infection - epidemiology
Vascular Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Karbase, a Danish register for vascular surgery is presented with data from four years experience. The register consists of 65 variables centered on risk factors, the perioperative course as well as follow-up information. During the four-year period 1989-1992 a total of 4902 admissions were registered in 3810 patients. Surgery was performed during 4005 admissions. Output data from Karbase is presented with results on survival and postoperative complications, related to preoperative risk factors. The incidence of surgical wound infections was 3.9%, with a significant reduction during the years (p = 0.004). Karbase is now used by all vascular surgical units in Denmark. We conclude that the establishment of a continuous registration has been beneficial to the department. We have achieved valid data on treatment, outcome and complications in relation to individual risk factors. In the future the use of Karbase will be extended with the aim of further quality development, locally as well as nation wide.
PubMed ID
7817410 View in PubMed
Less detail

5-year morbidity among very preterm infants in relation to level of hospital care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119186
Source
JAMA Pediatr. 2013 Jan;167(1):40-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Liisi Rautava
Janne Eskelinen
Unto Häkkinen
Liisa Lehtonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Turku University Hospital, 20520 Turku, Finland. liisi.rautava@utu.fi
Source
JAMA Pediatr. 2013 Jan;167(1):40-6
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Premature, Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Intensive Care, Neonatal
Logistic Models
Male
Odds Ratio
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient transfer
Registries
Secondary Care
Tertiary Care Centers
Tertiary Healthcare
Abstract
To determine whether birth and care in the highest-level hospitals (level III) compared with birth in or postnatal transfer to lower-level hospitals (level II) are associated with 5-year morbidity in very preterm children.
A cohort study.
Finland.
All surviving 5-year-old children born very preterm (gestational age
PubMed ID
23128961 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 9-year follow-up study of participants and nonparticipants in sigmoidoscopy screening: importance of self-selection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93168
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 May;17(5):1163-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Blom Johannes
Yin Li
Lidén Annika
Dolk Anders
Jeppsson Bengt
Påhlman Lars
Holmberg Lars
Nyrén Olof
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgery, Department for Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, K53, Huddinge, 141 86 Stockholm, Sweden. johannes.blom@ki.se
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 May;17(5):1163-8
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Colorectal Neoplasms - mortality - prevention & control
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - mortality
Health Behavior
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Sigmoidoscopy - utilization
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Self-selection may compromise cost-effectiveness of screening programs. We hypothesized that nonparticipants have generally higher morbidity and mortality than participants. METHODS: A Swedish population-based random sample of 1,986 subjects ages 59 to 61 years was invited to sigmoidoscopy screening and followed up for 9 years by means of multiple record linkages to health and population registers. Gender-adjusted cancer incidence rate ratio (IRR) and overall and disease group-specific and mortality rate ratio (MRR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated for nonparticipants relative to participants. Cancer and mortality rates were also estimated relative to the age-matched, gender-matched, and calendar period-matched Swedish population using standardized incidence ratios and standardized mortality ratios. RESULTS: Thirty-nine percent participated. The incidence of colorectal cancer (IRR, 2.2; 95% CI, 0.8-5.9), other gastrointestinal cancer (IRR, 2.7; 95% CI, 0.6-12.8), lung cancer (IRR, 2.2; 95% CI, 0.8-5.9), and smoking-related cancer overall (IRR, 1.4; 95% CI, 0.7-2.5) tended to be increased among nonparticipants relative to participants. Standardized incidence ratios for most of the studied cancers tended to be >1.0 among nonparticipants and
PubMed ID
18483338 View in PubMed
Less detail

10 year follow up study of mortality among users of hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9689
Source
BMJ. 2003 Jul 12;327(7406):81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-12-2003
Author
Merete Nordentoft
Nina Wandall-Holm
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Bispebjerg Hospital, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, 2400 Copenhagen NV, Denmark. merete.nordentoft@dadlnet.dk
Source
BMJ. 2003 Jul 12;327(7406):81
Date
Jul-12-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate mortality among users of hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen, and to identify predictors of death such as conditions during upbringing, mental illness, and misuse of alcohol and drugs. DESIGN: Register based follow up study. SETTING: Two hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen, Denmark PARTICIPANTS: 579 people who stayed in one hostel in Copenhagen in 1991, and a representative sample of 185 people who stayed in the original hostel and one other in Copenhagen. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Cause specific mortality. RESULTS: The age and sex standardised mortality ratio for both sexes was 3.8 (95% confidence interval 3.5 to 4.1); 2.8 (2.6 to 3.1) for men and 5.6 (4.3 to 6.9) for women. The age and sex standardised mortality ratio for suicide for both sexes was 6.0 (3.9 to 8.1), for death from natural causes 2.6 (2.3 to 2.9), for unintentional injuries 14.6 (11.4 to 17.8), and for unknown cause of death 62.9 (52.7 to 73.2). Mortality was comparatively higher in the younger age groups. It was also significantly higher among homeless people who had stayed in a hostel more than once and stayed fewer than 11 days, compared with the rest of the study group. Risk factors for early death were premature death of the father and misuse of alcohol and sedatives. CONCLUSION: Homeless people staying in hostels, particularly young women, are more likely to die early than the general population. Other predictors of early death include adverse experiences in childhood, such as death of the father, and misuse of alcohol and sedatives.
PubMed ID
12855527 View in PubMed
Less detail

[10-year follow-up study of mortality among users of hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179879
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Apr 26;166(18):1679-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-2004

14193 records – page 1 of 1420.