Skip header and navigation

Refine By

130 records – page 1 of 13.

[Achievements and prospects of the development of cardiology in Siberia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55661
Source
Kardiologiia. 1985 Oct;25(10):117-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1985
Author
A I Potapov
R S Karpov
Source
Kardiologiia. 1985 Oct;25(10):117-23
Date
Oct-1985
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coronary Disease - prevention & control - therapy
English Abstract
Far East
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Hypertension - prevention & control - therapy
Regional Medical Programs - organization & administration
Siberia
Abstract
Achievements of Siberian cardiologists in the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease are described with reference to specific conditions of Siberia and the Far East. Research priorities, such as problems of combined prophylaxis and the development of new methods for preventive check-ups of the population in Siberia are discussed.
PubMed ID
4087648 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A new regional service for rehabilitation after very serious brain injuries. I: Neurorehabilitation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193963
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Jul 2;163(27):3755-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2-2001

An integrated dialysis delivery network in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202089
Source
J CANNT. 1999;9(1):20-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
K. Peters
H. Ryan
Author Affiliation
London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario.
Source
J CANNT. 1999;9(1):20-3
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - organization & administration
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - therapy
Models, organizational
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Program Development - methods
Program Evaluation
Regional Medical Programs - organization & administration
Renal Dialysis
Abstract
In August 1995, the Ontario Ministry of Health (MOH) issued a request for proposal (RFP) for the establishment of new and expanded dialysis services. London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC) was successful in expanding its integrated dialysis delivery network with satellites in Stratford, Woodstock and Owen Sound. This achievement required collaboration of LHSC and host hospital staff to meet the challenging RFP requirements. With final approval received in January 1997, efforts were required to establish an operational model supporting self-care and full-care patients, to train satellite staff and patients, and to manage the resulting clinical impact. A balanced scorecard (Kaplan & Norton, 1992) evaluation model was developed. Initial outcome data indicate that full-care patients in satellites require more fallback support to London units, experience more hypotensive episodes during dialysis and, in some cases, demonstrate lower levels of dialysis adequacy and nutritional status when compared to satellite self-care patients. Findings from these data will assist in revising patient inclusion criteria and processes to optimize community-based dialysis.
PubMed ID
10335160 View in PubMed
Less detail

An integrated regional emergency psychiatry service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211573
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 1996 Jul;18(4):251-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
N. Kates
S. Eaman
J. Santone
C. Didemus
M. Steiner
M. Craven
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 1996 Jul;18(4):251-6
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Efficiency, Organizational
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - organization & administration
Humans
Models, organizational
Multi-Institutional Systems - organization & administration
Ontario
Organizational Objectives
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Program Development
Referral and Consultation - organization & administration
Regional Medical Programs - organization & administration
Abstract
This paper presents a model of an integrated Psychiatric Emergency Service serving Hamilton, a community of 450,000 in Southern Ontario. It describes the evolution of the service and how it has integrated five separate, hospital-run Emergency Psychiatric Services into a single service. The principles of the service and ways in which it operates are outlined and the advantages and drawbacks of the model are discussed. The authors conclude that such a model leads to a more efficient use of resources and is adaptable to most urban communities with a similar, or even larger population.
PubMed ID
8832258 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing the effectiveness and optimal structure of trauma systems: a consensus among experts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200771
Source
J Trauma. 1999 Sep;47(3 Suppl):S69-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
N C Mann
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health Sciences University, School of Medicine, Portland 97201-3098, USA. manncl@ohsu.edu
Source
J Trauma. 1999 Sep;47(3 Suppl):S69-74
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection
Decision Making
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Program Evaluation
Regional Medical Programs - organization & administration - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Trauma Centers - organization & administration - standards
United States
Abstract
To determine whether a consensus exists among experts regarding the effect of organized trauma systems on patient outcomes based on peer-reviewed, published evidence. Second, to ascertain whether experts agree on the optimal structure of trauma systems.
A multistage, longitudinal survey was administered to trauma system experts participating in a national symposium designed to assess the published evidence regarding trauma system effectiveness. Survey questions assessed published evidence by evaluating study designs, potential biases, and sample case mix. Trauma system structure was assessed by asking participants to rate the merit of previously identified key trauma system characteristics. Analyses were conducted using consensus theory.
Ninety symposium participants (99%) completed all five surveys. Respondents considered the evidence to be "moderately supportive" of trauma system effectiveness when considering severely injured patients in urban settings. Several key trauma system characteristics were identified as mandatory or highly desirable components of trauma system implementation and maintenance. Experts currently favor exclusive rather than inclusive trauma systems.
A consensus does exist among trauma system experts regarding the effectiveness of trauma systems and the optimal structure of trauma systems. Additional research is needed to determine whether trauma system benefits extend to other patient subgroups in other geographic regions. Consensus theory provides an impressive model for assessing rater agreement by controlling for response bias and providing a probability measure to determine whether a true consensus exists.
PubMed ID
10496615 View in PubMed
Less detail

Atlantic Telehealth Knowledge Exchange.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180433
Source
Telemed J E Health. 2004;10(1):93-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Patricia Dwyer
Valerie Hagerman
Chris-Anne Ingram
Ron MacFarlane
Sherry McCourt
Author Affiliation
TETRA, Faculty of Medicine, MUN, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada. patricid@mun.ca
Source
Telemed J E Health. 2004;10(1):93-101
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benchmarking
Cooperative Behavior
Focus Groups
Humans
Information Dissemination
Interviews as Topic
New Brunswick
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nova Scotia
Organizational Objectives
Prince Edward Island
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Regional Medical Programs - organization & administration
Telemedicine - organization & administration
Abstract
Atlantic Canada has some of the earliest, most comprehensive, well-established networks, and innovative applications for telehealth in the country. The region offers a range of models for telehealth, in terms of management structure, coordination, funding, equipment, utilization, and telehealth applications. Collectively, this diversity, experience, and wealth of knowledge can significantly contribute to the development of a knowledge base for excellence in telehealth services. There is no formal process in place for the sharing of information amongst the provinces. Information sharing primarily occurs informally through professional contacts and participation in telehealth organizations. A core group of organizations partnered to develop a process for knowledge exchange to occur. This type of collaborative approach is favored in Atlantic Canada, given the region's economy and available resources. The Atlantic Telehealth Knowledge Exchange (ATKE) project centred on the development of a collaborative structure, information sharing and dissemination, development of a knowledge repository and sustainability. The project is viewed as a first step in assisting telehealth stakeholders with sharing knowledge about telehealth in Atlantic Canada. Significant progress has been made throughout the project in increasing the profile of telehealth in Atlantic Canada. The research process has captured and synthesized baseline information on telehealth, and fostered collaboration amongst telehealth providers who might otherwise have never come together. It has also brought critical awareness to the discussion tables of governments and key committees regarding the value of telehealth in sustaining our health system, and has motivated decision makers to take action to integrate telehealth into e-health discussions.
PubMed ID
15104921 View in PubMed
Less detail

130 records – page 1 of 13.