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412 records – page 1 of 42.

[A center for research and prevention of suicide. Increased awareness of suicide is needed]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68523
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Mar 2;91(9):833-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2-1994
Author
D. Wasserman
Author Affiliation
Centrum för suicidforskning och -prevention, Samhällsmedicinska divisionen, Nordvästra sjukvårdsområdet, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Mar 2;91(9):833-5
Date
Mar-2-1994
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Regional Medical Programs
Research
Suicide - prevention & control
Sweden
PubMed ID
8139352 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Achievements and prospects of the development of cardiology in Siberia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55661
Source
Kardiologiia. 1985 Oct;25(10):117-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1985
Author
A I Potapov
R S Karpov
Source
Kardiologiia. 1985 Oct;25(10):117-23
Date
Oct-1985
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coronary Disease - prevention & control - therapy
English Abstract
Far East
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Hypertension - prevention & control - therapy
Regional Medical Programs - organization & administration
Siberia
Abstract
Achievements of Siberian cardiologists in the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease are described with reference to specific conditions of Siberia and the Far East. Research priorities, such as problems of combined prophylaxis and the development of new methods for preventive check-ups of the population in Siberia are discussed.
PubMed ID
4087648 View in PubMed
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[A computerized system for regional management of incidents is now tested. A complement to the Lex Maria system, indicates unobserved risks].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202999
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Feb 3;96(5):486-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-3-1999

Advances in the management of hypertension in the community over four years of intervention of the North Karelia project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247221
Source
Public Health. 1979 May;93(3):143-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1979

Air transport following surgical stabilization: an extension of regionalized trauma care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38472
Source
J Trauma. 1988 Jun;28(6):794-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1988
Author
S R Sharar
G K Luna
C L Rice
T D Valenzuela
M K Copass
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle 98104.
Source
J Trauma. 1988 Jun;28(6):794-8
Date
Jun-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aircraft - economics
Alaska
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Period
Prognosis
Regional Medical Programs - economics
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Retrospective Studies
Rural Population
Transportation of Patients - economics - methods
Trauma Centers
Washington
Wounds and Injuries - surgery - therapy
Abstract
A 30-month retrospective review was performed of all trauma patients initially evaluated and operatively stabilized at Level III hospitals, with subsequent specialized air transport within 48 hours of injury to the regional Level I trauma center in Seattle. Nineteen patients were identified, with a mean ISS of 44 (range, 20-66). Mean transport time and distance were 2.4 hours and 456 miles, respectively. The estimated average ground transport time for the same patients was 23.8 hours. No deaths occurred during transport, and the overall survival rate was 58%. Transport charges averaged $4,162, which was 14% of the complete hospitalization cost. We conclude that: 1) patient survival after air transport was no different than that predicted for trauma victims with immediate access to a trauma center; 2) postoperative hemodynamic instability predicted a poor outcome; 3) the higher cost of air relative to ground transport is outweighed by significant time savings in these critically injured patients; and 4) air transport following operative stabilization represents an extension of regionalized trauma care to the isolated areas of Washington and Alaska.
PubMed ID
3385823 View in PubMed
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The Alberta Ambassador Program: delivering Health Technology Assessment results to rural practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169962
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2006;6:21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Saifudin Rashiq
Pamela Barton
Christa Harstall
Donald Schopflocher
Paul Taenzer
Author Affiliation
Division of Pain Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton AB, Canada. srashiq@ualberta.ca
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2006;6:21
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Chronic Disease
Decision Making
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Evidence-Based Medicine - education
Humans
Pain Management
Physician's Practice Patterns
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Regional Medical Programs
Rural Health Services - standards
Teaching - methods
Teaching Materials
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Abstract
The purpose of Health Technology Assessment (HTA) is to make the best possible summary of the evidence regarding specific health interventions in order to influence health care and policy decisions. The need for decision makers to find relevant HTA data when it is needed is a barrier to its usefulness. These barriers are highest in rural areas and amongst isolated practitioners.
A multidisciplinary team developed an interactive case-based instructional strategy on the topic of chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) management using clinical evidence derived by HTA. The evidence for each of 18 CNCP interventions was distilled into single-sheet summaries. Clinicians and HTA specialists ('Ambassadors') conducted 11 two-hour interactive sessions on CNCP in eight of Alberta's nine health regions. Pre- and post-session evaluations were conducted.
The sessions were attended by 130 individuals representing 14 health and administrative disciplines. The ambassador model was well received. The use of content experts as ambassadors was highly rated. The educational strategy was judged to be effective. Awareness of the best evidence in CNCP management was increased. Although some participants reported practice changes as a result of the workshops, the program was not designed to measure changes in patient outcome.
The ambassador program was successful in increasing awareness of the best evidence in CNCP management, and positively influenced treatment decisions. Its teaching methods were felt to be unique and innovative by participants. Its methods could be applied to other clinical content areas in order to increase the uptake of the results of HTA.
Notes
Cites: J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2002 Fall;22(4):214-2112613056
Cites: J Health Soc Policy. 2002;15(3-4):23-3712705462
Cites: BMJ. 1998 Jul 25;317(7153):273-69677226
Cites: J Eval Clin Pract. 2003 Nov;9(4):385-9014758960
Cites: J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2004 Spring;24(2):68-7515279131
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Oct 11;362(9391):1225-3014568747
PubMed ID
16579855 View in PubMed
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The Alberta Hereditary Diseases Program: a regional model for delivery of genetic services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103220
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Feb 1;142(3):228-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-1990
Author
R B Lowry
P. Bowen
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Calgary, Alta.
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Feb 1;142(3):228-32
Date
Feb-1-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Education, Medical, Continuing
Genetic Diseases, Inborn
Genetics - education
Humans
Patient Education as Topic
Prenatal Diagnosis
Regional Medical Programs
Abstract
Genetic counselling and related services are generally provided at major university medical centres because they are very specialized. The need for rurally based genetic services prompted the inclusion of an outreached program in the Alberta Hereditary Diseases Program (AHDP), which was established in 1979; the AHDP was designed to provide services to the entire province through two regional centres and seven outreach clinics. There is a community health nurse in almost every health unit whose duties are either totally or partially devoted to the AHDP; thus, genetic help and information are as close as a rural health unit. The AHDP is designed to provide complete clinical (diagnostic, counselling and some management) services and laboratory (cytogenetic, biochemical and molecular) services for genetic disorders. In addition, the program emphasizes education and publishes a quarterly bulletin, which is sent free of charge to all physicians, hospitals, public health units, social service units, major radio and television stations, newspapers and public libraries and to selected individuals and groups in Alberta.
Notes
Cites: N Y State J Med. 1979 Feb;79(2):199-203107498
Cites: Science. 1978 May 26;200(4344):946-52644337
Cites: Lancet. 1964 Aug 1;2(7353):230-214163150
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1974 Nov 16;111(10):1147-50, 11534429943
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 1975 May;27(3):322-32803014
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1976 Mar;66(3):268-721259063
PubMed ID
2302614 View in PubMed
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412 records – page 1 of 42.