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[10,850 general practice consultations with elderly patients. From diagnosis-prescription-examination in Møre and Romsdal]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72639
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Nov 10;117(27):3980-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1997
Author
J. Straand
H. Sandvik
K. Rokstad
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for allmennmedisin, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Nov 10;117(27):3980-4
Date
Nov-10-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
English Abstract
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Musculoskeletal Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Prescriptions, Drug - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Respiratory Tract Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Abstract
Over a period of two months in 1988 and 1989 general practitioners in the Norwegian county of Møre and Romsdal recorded all contacts with their patients. Participation was close to 100%. We report data from 10,850 surgery consultations with elderly patients (65 years and older). 60% of the consultations involved female patients, and 58% of the patients were 65-74 years old. New diagnoses were made in one-third of the cases; two-thirds were follow-ups. The most common groups of diagnoses were cardiovascular (28%), musculoskeletal (13%), psychiatric (8%) and respiratory diseases (8%). Almost 10% of all consultations were for hypertension. Drugs were prescribed in 45% of all cases. 27% of all prescriptions were for cardiovascular drugs, and 25% were for drugs for the nervous system. The 20 most common diagnoses made up more than half of the total number of diagnoses. Almost 70% of all prescriptions were for the ten most common therapeutic groups.
PubMed ID
9441427 View in PubMed
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[337 home calls during daytime from the emergency medical center in Oslo]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30514
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 5;124(3):354-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-5-2004
Author
Erling Iveland
Jørund Straand
Author Affiliation
Oslo kommunale legevakt, Storgata 40, 0182 Oslo. ovrefoss.14@c2i.net
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 5;124(3):354-7
Date
Feb-5-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
House Calls - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Physicians, Family
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few studies have addressed physicians' home calls in Norway. The aim of this study is to analyse home calls during daytime in Oslo in relation to patients (age, sex, district), diagnoses, request procedures, and clinical outcome. METHODS AND MATERIAL: General practitioners in the City of Oslo emergency medical centre recorded their home calls during three months using a standardised form. RESULTS: Calls to 337 patients (mean age 70, median 77 years; two thirds females; seven to children below two years of age) were recorded. The home calls were requested by relatives (36%), the patients themselves (32%), community care nurses (11%), and nursing homes (7%). The assessments made by the operators of the medical emergency telephone were generally correct. Physicians reported 77% full and 20% partial match between reported and found medical problem. The physicians assessed that 22% of the patients would have been able to go and see a doctor. 39% of all patients were admitted to hospital, 34 % needed ambulance transportation. The admitting GPs received hospital reports only after 27% of admissions. INTERPRETATION: Access to acute home calls by a physician during daytime is a necessary function in an urban public health service.
PubMed ID
14963510 View in PubMed
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The 2012 SAGE wait times program: Survey of Access to GastroEnterology in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115731
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2013 Feb;27(2):83-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Desmond Leddin
David Armstrong
Mark Borgaonkar
Ronald J Bridges
Carlo A Fallone
Jennifer J Telford
Ying Chen
Palma Colacino
Paul Sinclair
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2013 Feb;27(2):83-9
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Colonoscopy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gastroenterology - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Periodically surveying wait times for specialist health services in Canada captures current data and enables comparisons with previous surveys to identify changes over time.
During one week in April 2012, Canadian gastroenterologists were asked to complete a questionnaire (online or by fax) recording demographics, reason for referral, and dates of referral and specialist visits for at least 10 consecutive new patients (five consultations and five procedures) who had not been seen previously for the same indication. Wait times were determined for 18 indications and compared with those from similar surveys conducted in 2008 and 2005.
Data regarding adult patients were provided by 173 gastroenterologists for 1374 consultations, 540 procedures and 293 same-day consultations and procedures. Nationally, the median wait times were 92 days (95% CI 85 days to 100 days) from referral to consultation, 55 days (95% CI 50 days to 61 days) from consultation to procedure and 155 days (95% CI 142 days to 175 days) (total) from referral to procedure. Overall, wait times were longer in 2012 than in 2005 (P
Notes
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2006 Jun;20(6):411-2316779459
Cites: Colorectal Dis. 2006 Jul;8(6):480-316784466
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2007 Mar;102(3):478-8117335442
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 Feb;22(2):155-6018299734
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 Feb;22(2):161-718299735
Cites: Healthc Q. 2009;12(3):72-919553768
Cites: Health Manag Technol. 2012 Mar;33(3):12-322515048
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2010 Jan;24(1):33-920186354
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2010 Oct;19(5):e2720584706
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2011 Feb;25(2):78-8221321678
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2011 Oct;25(10):547-5422059159
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2012 Jan;26(1):17-3122308578
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2010 Jan;24(1):20-520186352
PubMed ID
23472243 View in PubMed
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Access to and waiting time for psychiatrist services in a Canadian urban area: a study in real time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131782
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Aug;56(8):474-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Elliot M Goldner
Wayne Jones
Mei Lan Fang
Author Affiliation
Centre for Applied Research in Mental Health and Addiction, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia. egoldner@sfu.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Aug;56(8):474-80
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Cognitive Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To obtain improved quality information regarding psychiatrist waiting times by use of a novel methodological approach in which accessibility and wait times are determined by a real-time patient referral procedure.
An adult male patient with depression was referred for psychiatric assessment by a family physician. Consecutive calls were made to all registered psychiatrists (n = 297) in Vancouver. A semistructured call procedure was used to collect information about the psychiatrists' availability for receipt of this and similar referrals, identify factors that affect psychiatrist accessibility, and determine the availability of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT).
Efforts were made to contact 297 psychiatrists and 230 (77%) were reached successfully. Among the 230 psychiatrists contacted, 160 (70%) indicated that they were unable to accept the referral. Although 70 (30%) indicated that they might be able to consider accepting a referral, 64 (91% of those who would consider accepting the referral) indicated that they would need to review detailed, written referral information and could not provide estimates of the length of wait times if the patient was to be accepted. Only 6 (3% of the 230 psychiatrists contacted) offered immediate appointment times and their wait times ranged from 4 to 55 days. When asked whether they could provide CBT, most (56%) psychiatrists in clinical practice answered maybe.
Substantial barriers exist for family physicians attempting to refer patients for psychiatric referral. Consolidated efforts to improve access to psychiatric assessment are needed.
PubMed ID
21878158 View in PubMed
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Access to an outpatient cardiology consultation in southwestern Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201158
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1999 Aug;15(8):879-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
D. Massel
Author Affiliation
The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. dmassel@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1999 Aug;15(8):879-83
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - statistics & numerical data
Ambulatory Care - statistics & numerical data
Cardiology - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Ontario
Population Density
Private Practice - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To determine whether there were differences in waiting time for a consultation for a nonurgent cardiology problem among specialists in an academic centre compared with those in community practice.
Cross-sectional telephone survey.
Southwestern Ontario.
Academically affiliated and community-based specialists in cardiology or internal medicine with an interest in cardiology.
Waiting period in weeks for outpatient consultation.
Among community specialists, those with cardiology training had significantly longer waiting times than those without for nonurgent cardiology consultation (median 8.6 versus 3.8 weeks, P=0.0077). Waiting times for consultation were significantly longer for academic specialists than for those in community practice (median 9.1 versus 4.1 weeks, P=0.0013). Significantly longer waiting times exist in communities with a population greater than 100,000 (median 9.1 versus 4.0 weeks, P=0.0005).
Waiting times for consultation for a nonurgent cardiology problem are long. Waiting times are longer for physicians with certification in cardiology, in the academic medical centre and in larger communities.
PubMed ID
10446435 View in PubMed
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Access to health and social services for IDU: the impact of a medically supervised injection facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149722
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2009 Jul;28(4):341-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Will Small
Natasha Van Borek
Nadia Fairbairn
Evan Wood
Thomas Kerr
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2009 Jul;28(4):341-6
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
British Columbia
Data Collection
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needle-Exchange Programs - organization & administration
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - organization & administration
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Injection drug users (IDU) often experience barriers to conventional health-care services, and consequently might rely on acute and emergency services. This study sought to investigate IDU perspectives regarding the impact of supervised injection facility (SIF) use on access to health-care services.
Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 50 Vancouver-based IDU participating in the Scientific Evaluation of Supervised Injecting cohort. Audio-recorded interviews elicited IDU perspectives regarding the impact of SIF use on access to health and social services. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic analysis was conducted.
Fifty IDU, including 21 women, participated in this study. IDU narratives indicate that the SIF serves to facilitate access to health care by providing much-needed care on-site and connects IDU to external services through referrals. Participants' perspectives suggest that the SIF has facilitated increased uptake of health and social services among IDU.
Although challenges related to access to care remain in many settings, SIF have potential to promote health by facilitating enhanced access to health-care and social services through a model of care that is accessible to high-risk IDU.
PubMed ID
19594786 View in PubMed
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[Access to health care: perceptions of patients with multiple chronic conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167791
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2005 Nov;51:1502-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Martin Fortin
Danielle Maltais
Catherine Hudon
Lise Lapointe
Antoine Lutumba Ntetu
Author Affiliation
Département de Médecine de Famille, l'Université de Sherbrooke.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2005 Nov;51:1502-3
Date
Nov-2005
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appointments and Schedules
Chronic Disease
Communication Barriers
Female
Health Care Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians
Quebec
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Telephone
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To explore access to health care for patients presenting with multiple chronic conditions and to identify barriers and factors conducive to access.
Qualitative study with focus groups.
Family practice unit in Chicoutimi (Saguenay), Que.
Twenty-five male and female adult patients with at least four chronic conditions but no cognitive disorders or decompensating conditions.
For this pilot study, only three focus group discussions were held.
The main barriers to accessing follow-up appointments included long waits on the telephone, automated telephone-answering systems, and needing to attend at specific times to obtain appointments. The main barriers to specialized care were long waiting times and the need to get prescriptions and referrals from family physicians. Factors reported conducive to access included systematic callbacks and the personal involvement of family physicians. Good communication between family physicians and specialists was also perceived to be an important factor in access.
Systematic callbacks, family physicians' personal efforts to obtain follow-up visits, and better physician-specialist communication were all suggested as ways to improve access to care for patients with multiple chronic conditions.
Notes
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2000 Dec;51(11):1611-2511072882
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2001 Jul;54(7):661-7411438406
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2002 Nov 11;162(20):2269-7612418941
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2003 Oct;84(10):1417-2514586907
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 1997 Sep-Oct;16(5):149-629314686
Cites: J Ambul Care Manage. 1998 Jul;21(3):17-2610181843
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2005 May-Jun;3(3):223-815928225
PubMed ID
16926944 View in PubMed
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Access to osteoporosis treatment is critically linked to access to dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161794
Source
Med Care. 2007 Sep;45(9):896-901
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Suzanne M Cadarette
Monique A M Gignac
Susan B Jaglal
Dorcas E Beaton
Gillian A Hawker
Author Affiliation
Osteoporosis Research Program, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. s.cadarette@utoronto.ca
Source
Med Care. 2007 Sep;45(9):896-901
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - utilization
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Mass Screening - utilization
Ontario - epidemiology
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Professional-Patient Relations
Quality Assurance, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Women's health
Abstract
To determine if inequities in access to osteoporosis investigation [dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) testing] and treatment (bisphosphonate, calcitonin, and/or raloxifene) exist among older women in a region with universal health care coverage.
Community-dwelling women aged 65-89 years residing within 2 regions of Ontario, Canada were randomly sampled. Data were collected by standardized telephone interview. Potential correlates of DXA testing (verified by physician records), and current treatment were grouped by type as: "predisposing characteristics," "enabling resources," or "need factors" based on hypothesized relationships formulated before data collection. Variables associated with each outcome independent of "need factors" identified inequities in the system.
Of the 871 participants (72% response rate), 55% had been tested by DXA and 20% were receiving treatment. Using multiple variable logistic regression to adjust for need factors, significant inequities in access to DXA testing existed by age, health beliefs, education, income, use of preventive health services, region, and provider sex. DXA testing mediated access to treatment; 34% of those having had a DXA were treated compared with 2% of those who did not. Among women with osteoporosis, correctly reporting that their DXA test indicated osteoporosis and higher perceived benefits of taking pharmacological agents for osteoporosis were associated with treatment.
Significant inequities in access to fracture prevention exist in a region with universal health care coverage. Improved access to DXA and better communication to patients of both their DXA results and the benefits of treatment has the potential to reduce the burden of osteoporosis.
PubMed ID
17712261 View in PubMed
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Acetabular dysplasia at the age of 1 year in children with neonatal instability of the hip.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106433
Source
Acta Orthop. 2013 Oct;84(5):483-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Daniel Wenger
Henrik Düppe
Carl-Johan Tiderius
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics , Malmö, Skåne University Hospital , Sweden.
Source
Acta Orthop. 2013 Oct;84(5):483-8
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetabulum - abnormalities
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Early Diagnosis
Female
Hip Dislocation, Congenital - diagnosis - radiography - surgery
Humans
Infant
Joint Instability - congenital - prevention & control - surgery
Male
Observer Variation
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
As much as one-third of all total hip arthroplasties in patients younger than 60 years may be a consequence of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). Screening and early treatment of neonatal instability of the hip (NIH) reduces the incidence of DDH. We examined the radiographic outcome at 1 year in children undergoing early treatment for NIH.
All children born in Malm? undergo neonatal screening for NIH, and any child with suspicion of instability is referred to our clinic. We reviewed the 1-year radiographs for infants who were referred from April 2002 through December 2007. Measurements of the acetabular index at 1 year were compared between neonatally dislocated, unstable, and stable hips.
The incidence of NIH was 7 per 1,000 live births. The referral rate was 15 per 1,000. 82% of those treated were girls. The mean acetabular index was higher in dislocated hips (25.3, 95% CI: 24.6-26.0) than in neonatally stable hips (22.7, 95% CI: 22.3-23.2). Girls had a higher mean acetabular index than boys and left hips had a higher mean acetabular index than right hips, which is in accordance with previous findings.
Even in children who are diagnosed and treated perinatally, radiographic differences in acetabular shape remain at 1 year. To determine whether this is of clinical importance, longer follow-up will be required.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24171679 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and use of health services by primiparous women with urinary incontinence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163663
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2007 May-Jun;36(3):222-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
Edith Lepire
Marie Hatem
Author Affiliation
Université Laval, Québec, Québec, Canada. edithlepire@hotmail.com
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2007 May-Jun;36(3):222-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Puerperal Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Quality of Life
Quebec
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Urinary Incontinence - epidemiology - therapy
Women's health
Abstract
To describe the use of health services by primiparous women with urinary incontinence by (a) examining the quality of life of these women and (b) describing the different predictors associated with their use of health services.
This correlative study is a secondary analysis of a broader epidemiologic study.
The 382 women identified as having urinary incontinence in the main epidemiologic study in Quebec, Canada.
Consultation rate; quality of life, predictors of quality of life, and use of health services; treatments received; and reasons for not seeking help.
Consultation rate was 11.1%. Many sociodemographic, clinical, and urinary incontinence factors were significantly associated with a decreased quality of life. Only frequency of nocturia, severe urinary incontinence, use of sanitary protection, and lower scores on the quality-of-life scale were significantly associated with differences in consultation rates. Physiotherapy was the most popular treatment received (71.4%). Most women with urinary incontinence did not consult because they considered urinary incontinence to be normal (47.3%).
Few women with urinary incontinence used health services for their urinary incontinence problem despite a decreased quality of life. Health professionals need to intervene early and promptly to help women with urinary incontinence deal more adequately with urinary incontinence and to inform women on how and where to seek help.
PubMed ID
17489928 View in PubMed
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559 records – page 1 of 56.