Skip header and navigation

Refine By

376 records – page 1 of 38.

[10 years of testing of the HER2 status in breast cancer in Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116989
Source
Arkh Patol. 2012 Sep-Oct;74(5):3-6
Publication Type
Article

The 24-hour urine collection: gold standard or historical practice?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155561
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Dec;199(6):625.e1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Anne-Marie Côté
Tabassum Firoz
André Mattman
Elaine M Lam
Peter von Dadelszen
Laura A Magee
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, PQ, Canada.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Dec;199(6):625.e1-6
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - urine
British Columbia
Cohort Studies
Creatinine - urine
Female
Gynecology - standards
Hospitals, University
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - urine
Pre-Eclampsia - diagnosis - urine
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - diagnosis - urine
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Care - standards
Reference Standards
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Time Factors
Urinalysis - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of the study was to determine completeness of 24-hour urine collection in pregnancy.
This was a retrospective laboratory/chart review of 24-hour urine collections at British Columbia Women's Hospital. Completeness was assessed by 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion (UcreatV): expected according to maternal weight for single collections and between-measurement difference for serial collections.
For 198 randomly selected pregnant women with a hypertensive disorder (63% preeclampsia), 24-hour urine collections were frequently inaccurate (13-54%) on the basis of UcreatV of 97-220 micromol/kg per day (11.0-25.0 mg/kg per day) or 133-177 micromol/kg per day (15.1-20.1 mg/kg per day) of prepregnancy weight (respectively). Lean body weight resulted in more inaccurate collections (24-68%). The current weight was frequently unavailable (28%) and thus not used. For 161 women (81% proteinuric) with serial 24-hour urine levels, a median [interquartile range] of 11 [5-31] days apart, between-measurement difference in UcreatV was 14.4% [6.0-24.9]; 40 women (24.8%) had values 25% or greater, exceeding analytic and biologic variation.
Twenty-four hour urine collection is frequently inaccurate and not a precise measure of proteinuria or creatinine clearance.
PubMed ID
18718568 View in PubMed
Less detail

40-year follow-up of overweight children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38058
Source
Lancet. 1989 Aug 26;2(8661):491-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-1989
Author
H O Mossberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Lancet. 1989 Aug 26;2(8661):491-3
Date
Aug-26-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Birth weight
Body Height
Body Weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Energy intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - genetics - mortality
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Reference Standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
504 overweight children admitted to hospital between 1921 and 1947 were followed up for 40 years by questionnaires at 10 year intervals. The mean weight for height (W/H) standard deviation score (SDS) reached a maximum in puberty (+3.5). The SDS fell to about +1 in adulthood. 47% patients were still obese (SDS greater than +1) in adulthood; 84.6% of these had SDS more than +2 in childhood. The degree of obesity in the family (parents and grandparents) and the degree of overweight in puberty were the most important factors for weight level in adulthood. Even when their food intake was in accordance with recommended levels, obese children had higher than normal weight as adults. Excessive overweight in puberty (SDS greater than +3) was associated with higher than expected morbidity and mortality in adult life. Weight-reducing measures should be started early in life to improve the unfavourable long-term prognosis for very obese children.
PubMed ID
2570196 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abortion, sterilization, and sex education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250232
Source
Int Dig Health Legis. 1977;28(3): 614-620 1977):Unknown
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977

Accuracy of home blood glucose meters during hypoglycemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48242
Source
Diabetes Care. 1996 Dec;19(12):1412-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
Z. Trajanoski
G A Brunner
R J Gfrerer
P. Wach
T R Pieber
Author Affiliation
Department of Biophysics, Graz University of Technology, Austria. trajanoski@ibmt.tu-graz.ac.at
Source
Diabetes Care. 1996 Dec;19(12):1412-5
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring - instrumentation - standards
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood
Glucose Clamp Technique
Humans
Hypoglycemia - blood - diagnosis
Reference Standards
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the accuracy of home blood glucose meters during hypoglycemia. METHODS: Six blood glucose meters-One Touch II (LifeScan, Milpitas, CA), Companion II (Medisense, Cambridge, U.K.), Reflolux (Boehringer Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany), Accutrend (Boehringer Mannheim), Elite (Bayer, Munich, Germany), and HemoCue (HemoCue, Angelholm, Sweden)-were compared with a reference method (Beckman Glucose Analyzer 2). Glucose concentrations from arterialized venous blood samples were measured using all glucose meters (whole blood) and the reference method (plasma) during hypoglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps in 15 subjects. RESULTS: In total, 663 blood glucose monitor readings and 119 reference values ranging from 2.28 to 3.89 mmol/l were analyzed. The correlation coefficients and the percentage of measurements within 20% and outside 40% of the reference values for each glucose meter were as follows: One Touch II: 0.91, 99.2% and 0%; Companion II: 0.81, 88.2% and 2.5%; Reflolux: 0.78, 85.0% and 0.9%; Accutrend: 0.88, 46.0% and 6.6%; Elite: 0.78, 75.6% and 4.2%; and HemoCue: 0.93, 96.6% and 0% (P
Notes
Comment In: Diabetes Care. 1997 Jul;20(7):1204-5; author reply 1206-79203465
Comment In: Diabetes Care. 1997 Jul;20(7):1205-79203466
PubMed ID
8941473 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accuracy of parents in measuring body temperature with a tympanic thermometer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176648
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2005 Jan 11;6(1):3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-11-2005
Author
Joan L Robinson
Hsing Jou
Donald W Spady
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics and Stollery Children's Hospital, 2C3 Walter MacKenzie Centre, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2B7 Canada. jr3@ualberta.ca
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2005 Jan 11;6(1):3
Date
Jan-11-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alberta
Body Temperature - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Fever - diagnosis - nursing
Humans
Infant
Monitoring, Physiologic - instrumentation - nursing
Nursing Assessment
Parents
Predictive value of tests
Reference Standards
Sensitivity and specificity
Thermography - instrumentation - standards
Thermometers - standards
Tympanic Membrane - physiology
Abstract
It is now common for parents to measure tympanic temperatures in children. The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of these measurements.
Parents and then nurses measured the temperature of 60 children with a tympanic thermometer designed for home use (home thermometer). The reference standard was a temperature measured by a nurse with a model of tympanic thermometer commonly used in hospitals (hospital thermometer). A difference of >or= 0.5 degrees C was considered clinically significant. A fever was defined as a temperature >or= 38.5 degrees C.
The mean absolute difference between the readings done by the parent and the nurse with the home thermometer was 0.44 +/- 0.61 degrees C, and 33% of the readings differed by >or= 0.5 degrees C. The mean absolute difference between the readings done by the parent with the home thermometer and the nurse with the hospital thermometer was 0.51 +/- 0.63 degrees C, and 72 % of the readings differed by >or= 0.5 degrees C. Using the home thermometer, parents detected fever with a sensitivity of 76% (95% CI 50-93%), a specificity of 95% (95% CI 84-99%), a positive predictive value of 87% (95% CI 60-98%), and a negative predictive value of 91% (95% CI 79-98 %). In comparing the readings the nurse obtained from the two different tympanic thermometers, the mean absolute difference was 0.24 +/- 0.22 degrees C. Nurses detected fever with a sensitivity of 94% (95 % CI 71-100 %), a specificity of 88% (95% CI 75-96 %), a positive predictive value of 76% (95% CI 53-92%), and a negative predictive value of 97% (95%CI 87-100 %) using the home thermometer. The intraclass correlation coefficient for the three sets of readings was 0.80, and the consistency of readings was not affected by the body temperature.
The readings done by parents with a tympanic thermometer designed for home use differed a clinically significant amount from the reference standard (readings done by nurses with a model of tympanic thermometer commonly used in hospitals) the majority of the time, and parents failed to detect fever about one-quarter of the time. Tympanic readings reported by parents should be interpreted with great caution.
Notes
Cites: Indian Pediatr. 1990 Aug;27(8):811-52279804
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 1991 Jan;20(1):41-41984726
Cites: J Pediatr. 1994 Jul;125(1):83-58021794
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 1996 Sep;28(3):313-78780475
Cites: Crit Care Med. 1996 Sep;24(9):1501-68797622
Cites: Pediatr Emerg Care. 1996 Dec;12(6):4608989801
Cites: Can J Anaesth. 1998 Apr;45(4):317-239597204
Cites: J Pediatr. 1998 Oct;133(4):553-69787697
Cites: J Emerg Med. 2000 Jul;19(1):1-410863110
Cites: Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2002 Jul-Aug;41(6):405-1412166792
Cites: Pediatr Nurs. 2003 Mar-Apr;29(2):117-2512723823
Cites: Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2003 Oct;67(10):1091-714550963
Cites: Lancet. 1986 Feb 8;1(8476):307-102868172
Cites: Appl Nurs Res. 1990 May;3(2):52-52357072
Cites: Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1990 Jun;29(6):343-52361344
Cites: Crit Care Med. 1993 Aug;21(8):1181-58339584
PubMed ID
15644134 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accuracy of rapid influenza diagnostic tests: a meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126634
Source
Ann Intern Med. 2012 Apr 3;156(7):500-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-3-2012
Author
Caroline Chartrand
Mariska M G Leeflang
Jessica Minion
Timothy Brewer
Madhukar Pai
Author Affiliation
CHU Sainte-Justine, Université de Montréal, Montreal Chest Institute, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Ann Intern Med. 2012 Apr 3;156(7):500-11
Date
Apr-3-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antigens, Viral - analysis
Canada
Child
Humans
Immunochromatography - methods - standards
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - diagnosis
Reference Standards
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sensitivity and specificity
Virology - methods
Abstract
Timely diagnosis of influenza can help clinical management.
To examine the accuracy of rapid influenza diagnostic tests (RIDTs) in adults and children with influenza-like illness and evaluate factors associated with higher accuracy.
PubMed and EMBASE through December 2011; BIOSIS and Web of Science through March 2010; and citations of articles, guidelines, reviews, and manufacturers.
Studies that compared RIDTs with a reference standard of either reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (first choice) or viral culture.
Reviewers abstracted study data by using a standardized form and assessed quality by using Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies criteria.
159 studies evaluated 26 RIDTs, and 35% were conducted during the H1N1 pandemic. Failure to report whether results were assessed in a blinded manner and the basis for patient recruitment were important quality concerns. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 62.3% (95% CI, 57.9% to 66.6%) and 98.2% (CI, 97.5% to 98.7%), respectively. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 34.5 (CI, 23.8 to 45.2) and 0.38 (CI, 0.34 to 0.43), respectively. Sensitivity estimates were highly heterogeneous, which was partially explained by lower sensitivity in adults (53.9% [CI, 47.9% to 59.8%]) than in children (66.6% [CI, 61.6% to 71.7%]) and a higher sensitivity for influenza A (64.6% [CI, 59.0% to 70.1%) than for influenza B (52.2% [CI, 45.0% to 59.3%).
Incomplete reporting limited the ability to assess the effect of important factors, such as specimen type and duration of influenza symptoms, on diagnostic accuracy.
Influenza can be ruled in but not ruled out through the use of RIDTs. Sensitivity varies across populations, but it is higher in children than in adults and for influenza A than for influenza B.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research.
PubMed ID
22371850 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Actual problems of technical and metrological support of the extreme medicine service in Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195773
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2000 Dec;321(12):13-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000

Adolescent dietary patterns in Fiji and their relationships with standardized body mass index.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114873
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013;10:45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jillian T Wate
Wendy Snowdon
Lynne Millar
Melanie Nichols
Helen Mavoa
Ramneek Goundar
Ateca Kama
Boyd Swinburn
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Social Development, Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia. jwate@deakin.edu.au
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013;10:45
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Composition
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Diet - adverse effects
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Fiji - epidemiology
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Meals
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Population Groups
Reference Standards
Urban Population
Abstract
Obesity has been increasing in adolescents in Fiji and obesogenic dietary patterns need to be assessed to inform health promotion. The objective of this study was to identify the dietary patterns of adolescents in peri-urban Fiji and determine their relationships with standardized body mass index (BMI-z).
This study analysed baseline measurements from the Pacific Obesity Prevention In Communities (OPIC) Project. The sample comprised 6,871 adolescents aged 13-18 years from 18 secondary schools on the main island of Viti Levu, Fiji. Adolescents completed a questionnaire that included diet-related variables; height and weight were measured. Descriptive statistics and regression analyses were conducted to examine the associations between dietary patterns and BMI-z, while controlling for confounders and cluster effect by school.
Of the total sample, 24% of adolescents were overweight or obese, with a higher prevalence among Indigenous Fijians and females. Almost all adolescents reported frequent consumption of sugar sweetened beverages (SSB) (90%) and low intake of fruit and vegetables (74%). Over 25% of participants were frequent consumers of takeaways for dinner, and either high fat/salt snacks, or confectionery after school. Nearly one quarter reported irregular breakfast (24%) and lunch (24%) consumption on school days, while fewer adolescents (13%) ate fried foods after school. IndoFijians were more likely than Indigenous Fijians to regularly consume breakfast, but had a high unhealthy SSB and snack consumption.Regular breakfast (p
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 2001 Feb 17;357(9255):505-811229668
Cites: Obes Rev. 2001 May;2(2):117-3012119663
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2000 Dec;100(12):1511-2111138444
Cites: Obes Rev. 2004 May;5 Suppl 1:4-10415096099
Cites: Obes Res. 2004 May;12(5):778-8815166298
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Aug 25;292(8):927-3415328324
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1990 Sep;52(3):421-52393004
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1994 Feb;59(2):350-57993398
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1994 Oct;60(4):640-28092104
Cites: Pediatrics. 1997 Sep;100(3 Pt 1):323-99282700
Cites: Appetite. 1999 Aug;33(1):61-7010447980
Cites: Physiol Behav. 2004 Dec 30;83(4):573-815621062
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2005 Feb;93(2):241-715788117
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2006 Apr;30(4):590-416570087
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Aug;84(2):274-8816895873
Cites: Nutr Rev. 2009 Feb;67(2):65-7619178647
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2009 Aug;12(8):1115-2119243677
Cites: Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2010 Mar 25;316(2):104-819628019
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 May;91(5):1342-720237134
Cites: Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2010;19(3):372-8220805082
Cites: Obes Rev. 2011 Nov;12 Suppl 2:3-1122008554
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Feb;95(2):290-622218154
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2011 Jul;14(7):1245-5021129237
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2011 Nov;111(11):1696-70322027052
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2006 Dec;39(6):842-917116514
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2006;6:29517150112
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2007 Feb;10(2):152-717261224
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2007 Sep;85(9):660-718026621
Cites: Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2007;16(4):738-4718042537
Cites: Pac Health Dialog. 2006 Sep;13(2):57-6418181391
Cites: Ann Hum Biol. 2008 Jan-Feb;35(1):1-1018274921
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jun;16(6):1302-718388902
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jun;87(6):1662-7118541554
Cites: Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2008;17(3):375-8418818156
PubMed ID
23570554 View in PubMed
Less detail

376 records – page 1 of 38.