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Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index is associated with a lower incidence of colorectal cancer in women: the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121827
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-2013
Author
Cecilie Kyrø
Guri Skeie
Steffen Loft
Kim Overvad
Jane Christensen
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Date
Mar-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Avena sativa
Brassica
Bread
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Malus
Middle Aged
Norway
Pyrus
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Secale cereale
Vegetables
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a multi-factorial disease in which diet is believed to play a role. Little is known about the health effects of specific regional diets. The Nordic diet is high in fat and sugar but also includes a range of traditional products with anticipated health-promoting effects. The aim of this cohort study was to determine whether a healthy Nordic food index consisting of fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples, pears and root vegetables was related to CRC incidence. Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study of 57,053 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years, of whom 1025 developed CRC (13 years' follow-up). Incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95 % CI were calculated from Cox proportional hazard models. Women who strongly adhered to a healthy Nordic food index had a 35 % lower incidence of CRC than women with poor adherence (adjusted IRR, 0·65; 95 % CI 0·46, 0·94); a similar tendency was found for men. Women had a 9 % lower incidence of CRC per point adherence to the healthy Nordic food index, but no significant effect was found for men. A regional diet based on healthy Nordic food items was therefore associated with a lower incidence of CRC in women. The protective effect was of the same magnitude as previously found for the Mediterranean diet, suggesting that healthy regional diets should be promoted in order to ensure health; this will also preserve cultural heredity and the environment.
Notes
Erratum In: Br J Nutr. 2014 Feb;111(4):758-9
PubMed ID
22874538 View in PubMed
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Colorectal cancer prevention by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: effects of dosage and timing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200850
Source
Br J Cancer. 1999 Sep;81(1):62-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
J P Collet
C. Sharpe
E. Belzile
J F Boivin
J. Hanley
L. Abenhaim
Author Affiliation
Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Community Studies, Sir Mortimer B. Davis-Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, Canada.
Source
Br J Cancer. 1999 Sep;81(1):62-8
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Anticarcinogenic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Abstract
Epidemiological studies show that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduce colorectal cancer incidence. We measured the rate ratio for colorectal adenocarcinoma according to dosage and the timing of exposure by means of a case-control study, nested in a non-concurrent cohort linkage study, using the population of beneficiaries of the Saskatchewan Prescription Drug Plan from 1981 to 1995 with no history of cancer since 1970 as the source population. Four controls per case, matched on age and gender and alive when the case was diagnosed, were randomly selected. Dispensing rates, calculated over successive time periods, characterized NSAID exposure. We accrued 3844 cases of colon cancer and 1971 cases of rectal cancer. For colon cancer a significant trend towards a decreasing rate ratio was associated with increasing exposure during the 6 months preceding diagnosis (P-trend = 0.002). For both cancers, significant trends were associated with exposure 11-15 years before diagnosis (colon: P-trend = 0.01; rectum: P-trend = 0.0001). At the highest exposure levels the rate ratio for colon cancer was 0.57 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.36-0.89); for rectal cancer it was 0.26 (95% CI 0.11-0.61). No protection was associated with exposure during other periods. The timing of NSAID use must be considered in planning intervention trials to prevent colorectal cancer. There may be a 10-year delay before any preventive effect will appear.
Notes
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Comment In: Br J Cancer. 1999 Sep;81(1):1-210487603
PubMed ID
10487613 View in PubMed
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[Double contrast colon radiography plus rectosigmoidoscopy. The combination method is necessary for the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasms]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24818
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Jun 12;88(24):2229-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-12-1991

Micronutrient intake and risk of colon and rectal cancer in a Danish cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98414
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2010 Feb;34(1):40-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Nina Roswall
Anja Olsen
Jane Christensen
Lars O Dragsted
Kim Overvad
Anne Tjønneland
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. roswall@cancer.dk
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2010 Feb;34(1):40-6
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Eating
Female
Humans
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Micronutrients may protect against colorectal cancer. Especially folate has been considered potentially preventive. However, studies on folate and colorectal cancer have found contradicting results; dietary folate seems preventive, whereas folic acid in supplements and fortification may increase the risk. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between intake of vitamins C, E, folate and beta-carotene and colorectal cancer risk, focusing on possibly different effects of dietary, supplemental and total intake, and on potential effect modification by lifestyle factors. DESIGN: In a prospective cohort study of 56,332 participants aged 50-64 years, information on diet, supplements and lifestyle was collected through questionnaires. 465 Colon and 283 rectal cancer cases were identified during follow-up. Incidence rate ratios of colon and rectal cancers related to micronutrient intake were calculated using Cox proportional hazard analyses. RESULTS: The present study found a protective effect of dietary but not supplemental folate on colon cancer. No association with any other micronutrient was found. Rectal cancer did not seem associated with any micronutrient. For both colon and rectal cancer, we found an interaction between dietary folate and alcohol intake, with a significant, preventive effect among those consuming above 10g alcohol/day only. CONCLUSIONS: This study adds further weight to the evidence that dietary folate protects against colon cancer, and specifies that there is a source-specific effect, with no preventive effect of supplemental folic acid. Further studies should thus take source into account. Vitamins C, E and beta-carotene showed no relation with colorectal cancer.
PubMed ID
20060798 View in PubMed
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