Skip header and navigation

Refine By

324 records – page 1 of 33.

Abandoning nature: swimming pools and clean, healthy recreation in Hamilton, Ontario, c. 1930s-1950s.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128864
Source
Can Bull Med Hist. 2011;28(2):315-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Nancy B Bouchier
Ken Cruikshank
Author Affiliation
McMaster University.
Source
Can Bull Med Hist. 2011;28(2):315-37
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bathing Beaches - history
Bays
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Ontario
Public Health - history
Recreation - history
Swimming Pools - history
Water Pollution - history
Abstract
Municipal swimming pools arose as a technological fix for an urban public health and recreation crisis in Hamilton when its bay became a polluted sink for residential and industrial wastes. Until World War II, city leaders and medical authorities believed that they could identify, delineate, and construct safe natural swimming areas along the bay's shore, supplemented by a few public artificial swimming pools. After the war, the pollution situation worsened. For those who couldn't travel to cleaner lakeshores elsewhere, local authorities created swimming pools, thus abandoning the natural waters of the bay to the "constructive power of the profit motive".
PubMed ID
22164599 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accidents involving off-road motor vehicles in a northern community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234619
Source
CMAJ. 1987 Oct 1;137(7):630-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-1987
Author
P. Hasselback
H R Wilding
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1987 Oct 1;137(7):630-2
Date
Oct-1-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Motorcycles
Prospective Studies
Recreation
Rural Population
Safety
Saskatchewan
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
The increasing number of accidents associated with off-road motor vehicles used for recreational purposes prompted this prospective study. During 1985 the records of victims of all motor vehicle accidents who were seen at the Hudson Bay Union Hospital, Hudson Bay, Sask., were studied; patients involved in on-road vehicle accidents were included for comparison. Emphasis was placed on age, vehicle type, mechanism of accident, injury severity and the use of safety features. Almost half of the victims of off-road vehicle accidents were under 16 years of age. The poor adherence to government legislation and manufacturer recommendations was evident in the number of people who did not wear helmets or use headlights.
Notes
Cites: J Trauma. 1985 Jan;25(1):60-43965737
Cites: J Trauma. 1985 Mar;25(3):232-33981676
Cites: JAMA. 1985 Aug 23-30;254(8):10374021041
Cites: CMAJ. 1985 Sep 15;133(6):5554027824
Cites: CMAJ. 1986 Mar 1;134(5):540-23948066
Cites: CMAJ. 1986 Dec 15;135(12):1365-63779572
PubMed ID
3651929 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active spirit, active history: A culture of sports, activity and well-being among BC First Nations

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100784
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2010
  1 website  
Author
First Nations Health Council
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Keywords
First Nations
Health
Physical activity
Recreation
Sports
Well-being
Abstract
The First Nations Health Council created this book to collect the stories from First Nations people who have triumphed, mentored, or lead in traditional and non-traditional sports, recreation, fitness, or physical activity. The stories are heartwarming and honest, and are told with pride and triumph. Being physically active brings success over so many challenges and each story is valuable for it reflects our nature to be strong, endure, and to respect others, ourselves and the land.
Online Resources
Less detail

Activity levels among adolescents with migraine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168117
Source
Pediatr Neurol. 2006 Aug;35(2):119-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Joseph M Dooley
Kevin E Gordon
Ellen P Wood
Paula M Brna
Author Affiliation
Pediatric Neurology Division, Dalhousie University and the IWK Health Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. jdooley@dal.ca
Source
Pediatr Neurol. 2006 Aug;35(2):119-21
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Exercise
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Migraine Disorders - psychology
Recreation
Risk-Taking
Abstract
Data was analyzed from the nationally representative Canadian Community Health Survey. A total of 17,549 adolescents reported whether they had "migraine headaches" (response rate 99.9%) and in what exercise activities they participated. Those with migraine reported more daily activity than migraine-free peers when corrected for age and sex. They were as likely to play contact sports but were more involved in other noncompetitive activities, such as walking (P
PubMed ID
16876008 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1971 Oct 22;133(42):2084-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-22-1971

Adopting and implementing nutrition guidelines in recreational facilities: public and private sector roles. A multiple case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124044
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:376
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Dana Lee Olstad
Kim D Raine
Linda J McCargar
Author Affiliation
Alberta Institute for Human Nutrition, 4-126 Li Ka Shing Centre, 8606 112 St, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:376
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Food - standards
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Nutrition Policy
Obesity - prevention & control
Private Sector - organization & administration
Public Facilities
Qualitative Research
Recreation
Abstract
Recreational facilities are an important community resource for health promotion because they provide access to affordable physical activities. However, despite their health mandate, many have unhealthy food environments that may paradoxically increase the risk of childhood obesity. The Alberta Nutrition Guidelines for Children and Youth (ANGCY) are government-initiated, voluntary guidelines intended to facilitate children's access to healthy food and beverage choices in schools, childcare and recreational facilities, however few recreational facilities are using them.
We used mixed methods within an exploratory multiple case study to examine factors that influenced adoption and implementation of the ANGCY and the nature of the food environment within three cases: an adopter, a semi-adopter and a non-adopter of the ANGCY. Diffusion of Innovations theory provided the theoretical platform for the study. Qualitative data were generated through interviews, observations, and document reviews, and were analysed using directed content analysis. Set theoretic logic was used to identify factors that differentiated adopters from the non-adopter. Quantitative sales data were also collected, and the quality of the food environment was scored using four complementary tools.
The keys to adoption and implementation of nutrition guidelines in recreational facilities related to the managers' nutrition-related knowledge, beliefs and perceptions, as these shaped his decisions and actions. The manager, however, could not accomplish adoption and implementation alone. Intersectoral linkages with schools and formal, health promoting partnerships with industry were also important for adoption and implementation to occur. The food environment in facilities that had adopted the ANGCY did not appear to be superior to the food environment in facilities that had not adopted the ANGCY.
ANGCY uptake may continue to falter under the current voluntary approach, as the environmental supports for voluntary action are poor. Where ANGCY uptake does occur, changes to the food environment may be relatively minor. Stronger government measures may be needed to require recreational facilities to improve their food environments and to limit availability of unhealthy foods.
Notes
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2009 Jul-Aug;100(4):310-419722347
Cites: Milbank Q. 2004;82(4):581-62915595944
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2010 May;7(5):2208-2120623020
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2010 Nov;100(11):2137-4520864696
Cites: Can J Diet Pract Res. 2010 Winter;71(4):180-521144134
Cites: Can J Diet Pract Res. 2010 Winter;71(4):186-9121144135
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2005 Mar 17;352(11):1138-4515784668
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2005 Nov;15(9):1277-8816204405
Cites: Health Policy Plan. 2007 Jan;22(1):28-3917237492
Cites: Health Educ Res. 2007 Apr;22(2):203-2616861362
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2007 Apr;32(4):273-8117383558
Cites: Pediatrics. 2008 Apr;121(4):e794-80218381508
Cites: J Sch Health. 2008 May;78(5):245-5118387023
Cites: Proc Nutr Soc. 2008 Aug;67(3):307-1618700052
Cites: BMJ. 2008;337:a178618948344
Cites: J Nutr. 2009 Jan;139(1):142-419056643
Cites: Prev Med. 2009 Jan;48(1):45-5319026676
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2009 Feb;12(2):267-8318559129
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Feb;109(2 Suppl):S108-1719166665
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2009 Jul;6(3):A11019527582
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011;11:42321631946
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2011 Sep;8(5):A9821843428
Cites: Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Oct;6(5-6):342-6021838570
Cites: Curr Sports Med Rep. 2011 Nov-Dec;10(6):360-7022071397
Cites: Can J Diet Pract Res. 2011 Winter;72(4):17722146115
Cites: Health Policy. 2012 Mar;104(3):279-8722189205
Cites: J Acad Nutr Diet. 2012 Jan;112(1):137-4122709644
Cites: Health Promot Int. 2012 Sep;27(3):405-1521693474
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2011 Dec;14(12):2207-1221806872
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Jul;109(7):1256-6219559146
Cites: Health Serv Res. 1999 Dec;34(5 Pt 2):1225-3910591281
Cites: Prev Med. 1999 Dec;29(6 Pt 1):563-7010600438
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2000;78(4):549-6110885184
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2000 Dec;100(12):1482-611138440
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2001 Jan;91(1):112-711189801
Cites: Am J Health Promot. 2002 Sep-Oct;17(1):1-6, ii12271753
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2003 Apr;38(2):751-7612785571
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2003 Jul;93(7):1168-7312835204
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2004 Jan;104(1):90-314702590
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2004 Mar;94(3):463-714998815
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2004 Sep;94(9):1507-1215333303
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 2010 Mar-Apr;29(3):430-520194984
PubMed ID
22632384 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adventure therapy for adolescents with cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179137
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2004 Sep;43(3):278-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Bonnie Stevens
Susan Kagan
Janet Yamada
Iris Epstein
Madelyn Beamer
Mario Bilodeau
Sylvain Baruchel
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, The Hospital for Sick Children, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2004 Sep;43(3):278-84
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Female
Humans
Male
Memory
Nature
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Quality of Life
Recreation
Abstract
The objective of this study was to describe adolescents' with cancer experience in an adventure therapy program from a health related quality of life (HRQL) perspective. A qualitative descriptive research method was used. Eleven adolescents and five health professionals participated in a guided group adventure therapy expedition in a remote area of Canada. The expedition was videotaped and data were collected using an unstructured interview format with both adolescents and health professionals. Emerging themes were identified using a qualitative descriptive exploratory analysis. Four major themes and related sub-themes were generated. The major themes were: developing connections, togetherness, rebuilding self-esteem, and creating memories. Adventure therapy was viewed by the adolescents and health care professionals as a positive experience with multiple benefits. This preliminary research will contribute to an understanding of adolescents' experiences with cancer and provide a basis for future studies evaluating the impact of adventure therapy on HRQL.
PubMed ID
15266414 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aircraft noise annoyance in recreational areas after changes in noise exposure: comments on Krog and Engdahl (2004).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172319
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2005 Sep;118(3 Pt 1):1265-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Ronny Klaeboe
Author Affiliation
Institute of Transport Economics, Oslo, Norway. rk@toi.no
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2005 Sep;118(3 Pt 1):1265-7
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Noise, Transportation - adverse effects
Norway
Quality of Life
Recreation
Regression Analysis
Abstract
When Gardermoen replaced Fornebu as the main airport for Oslo, aircraft noise levels increased in recreational areas near Gardermoen and decreased in areas near Fornebu. Krog and Engdahl [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 116, 323-333 (2004)] estimate that recreationists' annoyance from aircraft noise in these areas changed more than would be anticipated from the actual noise changes. However, the sizes of their estimated "situation" effects are not credible. One possible reason for the anomalous results is that standard regression assumptions become violated when motivational factors are inserted into the regression model. Standardized regression coefficients (beta values) should also not be utilized for comparisons across equations.
Notes
Comment On: J Acoust Soc Am. 2004 Jul;116(1):323-3315295993
PubMed ID
16240785 View in PubMed
Less detail

324 records – page 1 of 33.