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73 records – page 1 of 8.

A 25-year perspective of peripheral nerve surgery: evolving neuroscientific concepts and clinical significance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198627
Source
J Hand Surg Am. 2000 May;25(3):391-414
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
G. Lundborg
Author Affiliation
Department of Hand Surgery, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Hand Surg Am. 2000 May;25(3):391-414
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anastomosis, Surgical
Animals
Female
Hand Injuries - surgery
Humans
Male
Nerve Regeneration - physiology
Neurosurgical Procedures - adverse effects - methods
Peripheral Nerves - physiology - surgery
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases - surgery
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Sweden
Abstract
In spite of an enormous amount of new experimental laboratory data based on evolving neuroscientific concepts during the last 25 years peripheral nerve injuries still belong to the most challenging and difficult surgical reconstructive problems. Our understanding of biological mechanisms regulating posttraumatic nerve regeneration has increased substantially with respect to the role of neurotrophic and neurite-outgrowth promoting substances, but new molecular biological knowledge has so far gained very limited clinical applications. Techniques for clinical approximation of severed nerve ends have reached an optimal technical refinement and new concepts are needed to further increase the results from nerve repair. For bridging gaps in nerve continuity little has changed during the last 25 years. However, evolving principles for immunosuppression may open new perspectives regarding the use of nerve allografts, and various types of tissue engineering combined by bioartificial conduits may also be important. Posttraumatic functional reorganizations occurring in brain cortex are key phenomena explaining much of the inferior functional outcome following nerve repair, and increased knowledge regarding factors involved in brain plasticity may help to further improve the results. Implantation of microchips in the nervous system may provide a new interface between biology and technology and developing gene technology may introduce new possibilities in the manipulation of nerve degeneration and regeneration.
PubMed ID
10811744 View in PubMed
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Acetabular reconstruction with impaction bone grafting and cemented polyethylene socket in total hip revision arthroplasty.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276221
Source
Scand J Surg. 2015 Dec;104(4):267-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
I. Kostensalo
M. Seppänen
P. Virolainen
J. Mokka
M. Koivisto
K T Mäkelä
Source
Scand J Surg. 2015 Dec;104(4):267-72
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetabulum - surgery
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - mortality
Bone Cements
Bone Transplantation - methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Hip - surgery
Polyethylene
Postoperative Complications
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Bone deficiency in revision total hip arthroplasty is a challenge to the surgeon. One option for restoration of the bone stock is impaction bone grafting and use of a cemented socket. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mid-term clinical outcome of impaction bone grafting and cemented socket revisions.
A total of 59 patients (60 hips) underwent revision arthroplasty with impaction bone grafting and application of a cemented socket on the acetabular side in the Turku University Hospital from 1999 to 2004. The study end-point was re-revision for any reason. The cumulative percentages for survival were followed and estimated with Kaplan-Meier curves. Associations between occurrence of re-revision and potential risk factors were analyzed with logistic regression. Results were quantified by odd ratios and 95% confidence intervals. The mean age of the patients was 69 years (33% male). A total of 3% of the patients had a class I Paprosky acetabular defect, 38% had class II, and 55% had class III.
The overall survival rate was 73%. The mean follow-up time was 7 years. The most common reason for re-revision was aseptic loosening of the acetabular component (13 patients, 81% of re-revisions). Cox's regression analysis did not identify any risk factors for re-revision.
Our results were inferior compared to some previous studies. Impaction bone grafting of acetabular defects in revision total hip arthroplasty may not always provide a reliable bone stock in long-term.
PubMed ID
25681057 View in PubMed
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Adopting a child with cleft lip and palate: a study of parents' experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118377
Source
J Plast Surg Hand Surg. 2013 Feb;47(1):30-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Emma Hansson
Jenny Ostman
Magnus Becker
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. emma.hansson@med.lu.se
Source
J Plast Surg Hand Surg. 2013 Feb;47(1):30-5
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adoption - ethnology - psychology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Cleft Lip - ethnology - surgery
Cleft Palate - ethnology - surgery
Cohort Studies
Emotions
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Adoption of Chinese children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) has become increasingly more common in Sweden. The aim of this study was to examine parents' experience when adopting a child with CLP. Since 2008, 34 adopted children with CLP have been treated in our department. A questionnaire was sent to 33 of the families and 30 of them answered (91%). The parents had queued from 1 month to 8 years before they were offered a child. Eighteen families reported that they received information on CLP from the adoption agency and 87% contacted the department of plastic surgery for additional information. In 15 cases (45%) previously unknown medical conditions or birth defects other than CLP were discovered in Sweden. Most parents (67%) had been informed before the adoption that their child could be a carrier of resistant bacteria, but not all had received enough information to grasp what it implies to be a carrier. The great majority of the families did not feel that the early hospitalisation for the first operation had a negative impact on the attachment between them and their adopted child. They thought that the aesthetic and functional results of the operations were "better than expected". Seventeen families stated that people react to the cleft and four of them think that the reactions are a problem. Presumptive adoptive parents should be informed that the child might have unsuspected medical conditions, resistant bacteria, what carriage implies, and that needed treatment and long-term results are not predictable.
PubMed ID
23216342 View in PubMed
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Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(16):1977-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Heli Lagus
Jyrki Vuola
Author Affiliation
Palovammaosaston vastaava lääkäri, HYKS, Töölön sairaala, plastikkakirurgian klinikka, Helsinki. heli.lagus@hus.fi
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(16):1977-85
Date
2004
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biocompatible Materials
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Materials Testing
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Sensitivity and specificity
Skin, Artificial
Tissue Engineering - methods
Wound Healing - physiology
PubMed ID
15551771 View in PubMed
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Autofibrin glue compound and its utilization during reconstructive operations on the ear.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33307
Source
Rev Laryngol Otol Rhinol (Bord). 1999;120(1):53-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
N Y Shatkovskaya
Y A Soushko
K N Veremeyenko
A I Kizim
O N Borissenko
Author Affiliation
Institute Kolomiitchenko, Tympanoplastic Department, Kiev, Ukrainia.
Source
Rev Laryngol Otol Rhinol (Bord). 1999;120(1):53-6
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Chronic Disease
Ear - surgery
Female
Fibrin Tissue Adhesive
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Otitis Media, Suppurative - surgery
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Tissue Adhesives
Tympanoplasty - methods
Abstract
A new autofibrin glue compound (AFGC) is suggested. The experiment has demonstrated that the inclusion of antibiotics and lysozyme does not influence its adhesive qualities or sterilization with gamma radiation. It has been revealed that the dose to sterilise the compound was 75 Gy. AFGC was used during tympanoplasties in 55 patients for fixation of ossiculoplasties, fascia autotransplant and skin of the external auditory meatus. Morphological and functional results of tympanoplasties turned out to be better than those of the control group in which the glue was not used.
PubMed ID
10371867 View in PubMed
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Autologous fat transplantation to the velopharynx for treating persistent velopharyngeal insufficiency of mild degree secondary to overt or submucous cleft palate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117906
Source
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2013 Mar;66(3):337-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Charles Filip
Michael Matzen
Ingegerd Aagenæs
Ragnhild Aukner
Lillian Kjøll
Hans Erik Høgevold
Kim Tønseth
Author Affiliation
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, PO Box 4950, Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway. cfilip@ous-hf.no
Source
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2013 Mar;66(3):337-44
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - transplantation
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Cleft Palate - complications - pathology - surgery
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Observer Variation
Prospective Studies
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Speech Intelligibility
Transplantation, Autologous
Treatment Outcome
Velopharyngeal Insufficiency - etiology - physiopathology - surgery
Voice Quality
Young Adult
Abstract
Autologous fat transplantation to the velopharynx has been described in a few smaller studies including heterogeneous groups of patients for the treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). The aim of this study was to evaluate speech and to measure velopharyngeal closure with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients who underwent autologous fat transplantation for the treatment of persistent VPI of mild degree secondary to overt or submucous cleft palate.
A prospective study of 16 patients with persistent VPI of mild degree secondary to overt or submucous cleft palate who underwent autologous fat transplantation to the velopharynx. The patients were injected with a median of 5.6 (3.8-7.6) ml autologous fat to the velopharynx. Pre- and 1-year postoperative audio recordings were blinded for scoring independently by three senior speech therapists. Hypernasality, hyponasality, nasal turbulence and audible nasal emission were scored on a five-point scale. Pre- and 1-year postoperative MRIs were obtained during vocal rest and during phonation in 12 patients. Data measured were the velopharyngeal distance in the sagittal plane and the velopharyngeal gap area in the axial plane.
Hypernasality improved significantly (p=0.030), but not audible nasal emission (p=0.072) or nasal turbulence (p=0.12). The velopharyngeal distance during phonation decreased significantly (p=0.013), but not the velopharyngeal gap area (p=0.16). There was no significant correlation between speech and MRI results.
Autologous fat transplantation to the velopharynx improved hypernasality significantly, but not audible nasal emission or nasal turbulence in patients with persistent VPI of mild degree secondary to overt or submucous cleft palate. Given the low number of patients and the lack of a control group, the value of fat transplantation for the treatment of mild VPI is not proven for sure.
Notes
Comment In: J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2014 Aug;67(8):1155-624581953
PubMed ID
23254179 View in PubMed
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Can the PFDI (Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory) or PFIQ (Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaires) be used to predict outcome in pelvic reconstructive surgery?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107420
Source
Prog Urol. 2013 Sep;23(11):940-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
V. Letouzey
G. Mercier
S. Adjoussou
E. Bohoussou
P. Mares
R. de Tayrac
Author Affiliation
Gynecology and obstetrics department, Caremeau university hospital, place Pr R.-Debré, 30900 Nimes, France. Electronic address: Vincent.go@wanadoo.fr.
Source
Prog Urol. 2013 Sep;23(11):940-5
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Colposcopy - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Pelvic Floor - physiopathology - surgery
Pelvic Organ Prolapse - diagnosis - physiopathology - surgery
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Surgical Mesh
Treatment Outcome
Uterine Prolapse - physiopathology - surgery
Vagina - surgery
Abstract
To determine a syndrome score threshold on PFDI or PFIQ predictive of a significant improvement in post-operative functional results.
A retrospective case review (Canadian Task Force Classification II-2).
University and research hospital.
Women diagnosed with pelvic organ prolapse and repaired with synthetic vaginal mesh.
Quality of life was arbitrarily considered to have improved significantly if the score decreases by more than 50% between pre-operatively and 36 months post-operatively. We investigated the pre-operative cut-off score predictive of no quality of life improvement at M36 from a prospective trial for surgical pelvic organ prolapse treatment.
The most accurate pre-operative cut-off score predicting a failure to improve quality of life at 36 months post-operatively was 62/300 (PFDI Score). This cut-off value had a positive predictive value of 83.6% and specificity of 62.1%. No significant threshold was obtained from the PFIQ score.
The intensity of symptoms before surgery may interfere as a predictive factor for outcome.
PubMed ID
24010925 View in PubMed
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A cephalometric intercenter comparison of patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate: analysis at 5 and 10 years of age and long term.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91484
Source
Cleft Palate Craniofac J. 2008 Nov;45(6):654-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Meazzini Maria Costanza
Giussani Greta
Morabito Alberto
Semb Gunvor
Garattini Giovanna
Brusati Roberto
Author Affiliation
Regional Center for Cleft Lip and Palate, Department of Maxillo-Facial Surgery, San Paolo Hospital, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. cmeazzini@yahoo.it
Source
Cleft Palate Craniofac J. 2008 Nov;45(6):654-60
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cephalometry
Child
Child, Preschool
Cleft Lip - physiopathology - surgery
Cleft Palate - physiopathology - surgery
Clinical Protocols
Female
Humans
Italy
Male
Malocclusion - surgery
Maxillofacial Development
Needs Assessment
Norway
Oral Surgical Procedures - methods
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare the short- and long-term craniofacial growth of patients operated with the Milan protocol to those operated with the Oslo protocol. DESIGN: The Milan sample included 88 patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) at 5 years, 26 at 10 years, and 23 at the end of growth. The Oslo samples included 48 UCLP patients at 5 years, 29 at 10, and 23 at growth completion. Lateral cephalograms were used for comparison. An unpaired t test was run for the 5- and 10-year-old samples. The samples long term were matched for age and sex, and a paired t test was run. RESULTS: There was no significant cephalometric difference in the maxillary prominence at 5 years, a mild but significant difference at 10 years, and again no difference at the end of growth. Nevertheless, at an older age, the need for orthognathic surgery was larger in the Milan sample (26%) than in the Oslo sample (13%). CONCLUSION: Although no statistically significant differences in the cephalometric measurements were found long term, the need for orthognathic surgery was clinically judged to be larger in the Milan sample. On the other hand, although the Milan protocol seemed to require more final jaw surgery, only the cases that needed an additional orthognathic procedure in the Milan group will undertake a third surgical step, while the Oslo protocol included three surgical steps for all the patients.
PubMed ID
18956937 View in PubMed
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Colopharyngoplasty for intractable caustic pharyngoesophageal strictures in an indigenous African community--adverse impact of concomitant tracheostomy on outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139566
Source
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2011 Feb;12(2):213-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Mark Tettey
Frank Edwin
Ernest Aniteye
Martin Tamatey
Kow Entsua-Mensah
Ernest Ofosu-Appiah
Kwabena Frimpong-Boateng
Author Affiliation
National Cardiothoracic Centre, Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Box KB 846 Korle Bu, Accra. Ghana. mawut@mail.com
Source
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2011 Feb;12(2):213-7
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Burns, Chemical - etiology - surgery
Caustics - toxicity
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Colon - transplantation
Esophageal Stenosis - chemically induced - ethnology - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pharyngeal Diseases - chemically induced - surgery
Pharynx - injuries - surgery
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Retrospective Studies
Tracheostomy - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Surgical management of caustic strictures of the upper digestive tract poses difficult challenges. This is because reconstruction above the cricopharyngeal junction interferes with the mechanisms of swallowing and respiration. This report reviews the outcome of colopharyngeal reconstruction of severe diffuse pharyngoesophageal caustic strictures in an indigenous African community.
The medical records of patients who underwent colopharyngoplasty from January 2006 to December 2008 were retrospectively reviewed to obtain information on patients' demographics, surgical technique and outcome.
In the study period, 20 patients underwent reconstruction for caustic esophageal strictures; in five (three males, two females) colopharyngoplasty was required. Their ages ranged from four to 56 years (mean 25 years). Follow-up ranged from 23 to 94 months (mean 33 months). Colopharyngoplasty using left colon tunneled retrosternally was performed in all patients. Rehabilitative training for deglutition was required for 0.5-5.0 months postoperatively to restore near-normal swallowing in all patients. However, tracheostomy complications caused two deaths (one early, one late) and varicella encephalitis caused another late death.
In this African community, colopharyngoplasty provided an effective mean of restoration of upper digestive tract continuity in patients with severe caustic pharyngoesophageal strictures. Tracheostomy in this setting portends a significant long-term mortality risk.
PubMed ID
21047823 View in PubMed
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Comparison of anterolateral thigh and radial forearm free flap donor site morbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160900
Source
Microsurgery. 2007;27(8):651-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Christine B Novak
Joan E Lipa
Sabrena Noria
Keith Allison
Peter C Neligan
Ralph W Gilbert
Author Affiliation
Wharton Head and Neck Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Microsurgery. 2007;27(8):651-4
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Forearm
Head and Neck Neoplasms - complications - surgery
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Surgical Flaps
Thigh
Abstract
This study evaluated patient-reported outcome of the donor site in patients following head and neck cancer reconstruction. Patients who had undergone cancer reconstruction using either an anterolateral thigh or a radial forearm free flap and who were at least 6 months postsurgery were included and contacted by telephone. There were 37 patients (mean age 61 years, standard deviation 16 years) with 18 anterolateral thigh flaps and 19 radial forearm flaps. The majority of patients were not bothered by scar appearance, light touch, numbness or pain. Significantly more females (P = 0.038) and more patients with radial forearm flaps (P = 0.045) were bothered by the cold at the donor site and more females reported that the shape of the operated extremity was different (P = 0.009). Donor site morbidity is not significant following a radial forearm or anterolateral thigh free flap and the reconstruction should be based upon individual patient factors and surgeon expertise.
PubMed ID
17929262 View in PubMed
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73 records – page 1 of 8.