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Adequacy of niacin, folate, and vitamin B12 intakes from foods among Newfoundland and Labrador adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113239
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2013;74(2):63-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jennifer Colbourne
Natasha Baker
Peter Wang
Lin Liu
Christina Tucker
Barbara Roebothan
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2013;74(2):63-8
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cereals
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - blood
Food, Fortified
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Niacin - administration & dosage - blood
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Recommended dietary allowances
Risk factors
Vitamin B 12 - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Adequacy of intake for niacin, folate, and vitamin B12 from food was estimated in an adult population in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL). Also considered was whether study findings support current Canadian food fortification policies.
Four hundred randomly selected adult NL residents were surveyed by telephone. Secondary analysis was performed on two 24-hour food recalls for each participant. Mean daily intakes of niacin, folate, and vitamin B12 were estimated from foods only and compared by sex/age subgroup. Adequacy of intakes was estimated. Contributions of folate by ready-to-eat cereal and bread products were also estimated.
Intakes of all three nutrients were higher in men. In comparison with recommendations, daily niacin intakes were as follows: excessive for 21.9% of all participants (and for 56.8% of men aged 28 to 54), within the recommended range for 73.6%, and less than adequate for 4.5%. In comparison with recommendations, daily folate intakes were as follows: within the recommended range for 18.1% of participants and less than adequate for 81.9%. In comparison with recommendations, daily vitamin B12 intakes were less than adequate for 36.3% of participants.
More than 20% of those surveyed were consuming, from food alone, niacin at levels above the maximum recommended. Food fortification policies pertaining to niacin should be revisited. In addition, despite fortification, NL adults may be consuming inadequate amounts of folate from foods.
PubMed ID
23750977 View in PubMed
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Adherence to dietary recommendations for Swedish adults across categories of greenhouse gas emissions from food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293496
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec; 20(18):3381-3393
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Camilla Sjörs
Fredrik Hedenus
Arvid Sjölander
Annika Tillander
Katarina Bälter
Author Affiliation
1Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (MEB),Karolinska Institutet,Nobels väg 12a,SE-171 77 Stockholm,Sweden.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec; 20(18):3381-3393
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Diet
Diet Records
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Exercise
Female
Greenhouse Gases - analysis
Humans
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Patient compliance
Recommended dietary allowances
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore associations between diet-related greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE), nutrient intakes and adherence to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations among Swedish adults.
Diet was assessed by 4d food records in the Swedish National Dietary Survey. GHGE was estimated by linking all foods to carbon dioxide equivalents, using data from life cycle assessment studies. Participants were categorized into quartiles of energy-adjusted GHGE and differences between GHGE groups regarding nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations were explored.
Sweden.
Women (n 840) and men (n 627) aged 18-80 years.
Differences in nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations between GHGE groups were generally small. The dietary intake of participants with the lowest emissions was more in line with recommendations regarding protein, carbohydrates, dietary fibre and vitamin D, but further from recommendations regarding added sugar, compared with the highest GHGE group. The overall adherence to recommendations was found to be better among participants with lower emissions compared with higher emissions. Among women, 27 % in the lowest GHGE group adhered to at least twenty-three recommendations compared with only 12 % in the highest emission group. For men, the corresponding figures were 17 and 10 %, respectively.
The study compared nutrient intakes as well as adherence to dietary recommendations for diets with different levels of GHGE from a national dietary survey. We found that participants with low-emission diets, despite higher intake of added sugar, adhered to a larger number of dietary recommendations than those with high emissions.
PubMed ID
28879831 View in PubMed
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Challenges in planning long-term care menus that meet dietary recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113236
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2013;74(2):84-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Navita Viveky
Jennifer Billinsky
Lilian Thorpe
Jane Alcorn
Susan J Whiting
Thomas Hadjistavropoulos
Author Affiliation
College of Pharmacy & Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2013;74(2):84-7
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Cereals
Dairy Products
Diet - standards
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Long-Term Care - methods
Male
Nutritive Value
Recommended dietary allowances
Trace Elements - administration & dosage
Vegetables
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
Long-term care (LTC) homes plan menus based on Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide (CFG) recommendations for older adults. To determine whether recommended CFG servings and nutrients were being provided, we analyzed the menu of a large LTC facility in a metropolitan area and compared our analysis with a similar one conducted in 2000.
A full week's menu from a large Saskatoon LTC facility was analyzed and compared with CFG and recent Dietary Recommended Intake nutrient recommendations. The menu was analyzed using The Food Processor SQL. The 2011 menu was compared with the similar 2000 menu analysis to permit an evaluation of changes over a decade.
The 2011 menu demonstrated a significant improvement in servings of vegetables and fruit (4.6 to 7.2 servings). Servings of grain products had declined from 4.9 to 3.6 and servings of milk and alternatives had declined from 2.4 to 1.2 since 2000. Servings of meat and alternatives, total carbohydrate, and protein were not significantly different. Foods on the 2011 menu were lower in fat and higher in dietary fibre and offered more vitamins and minerals.
Greater attention to the planning of LTC menus may explain improvements in the 2011 LTC menu. The current menu, however, needs to overcome the challenges that prevent it from meeting CFG recommendations for older adults.
PubMed ID
23750981 View in PubMed
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Consumer involvement in dietary guideline development: opinions from European stakeholders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118665
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 May;16(5):769-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Kerry A Brown
Maria Hermoso
Lada Timotijevic
Julie Barnett
Inger Therese L Lillegaard
Irena Rehurková
Ainhoa Larrañaga
Azra Loncarevic-Srmic
Lene Frost Andersen
Jirí Ruprich
Laura Fernández-Celemín
Monique M Raats
Author Affiliation
Food Consumer Behaviour and Health Research Centre, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts and Human Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, UK. kerry.brown@surrey.ac.uk
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 May;16(5):769-76
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Czech Republic
Decision Making
Diet - standards
Germany
Great Britain
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Norway
Recommended dietary allowances
Serbia
Spain
Abstract
The involvement of consumers in the development of dietary guidelines has been promoted by national and international bodies. Yet, few best practice guidelines have been established to assist with such involvement.
Qualitative semi-structured interviews explored stakeholders' beliefs about consumer involvement in dietary guideline development.
Interviews were conducted in six European countries: the Czech Republic, Germany, Norway, Serbia, Spain and the UK.
Seventy-seven stakeholders were interviewed. Stakeholders were grouped as government, scientific advisory body, professional and academic, industry or non-government organisations. Response rate ranged from 45 % to 95 %.
Thematic analysis was conducted with the assistance of NVivo qualitative software. Analysis identified two main themes: (i) type of consumer involvement and (ii) pros and cons of consumer involvement. Direct consumer involvement (e.g. consumer organisations) in the decision-making process was discussed as a facilitator to guideline communication towards the end of the process. Indirect consumer involvement (e.g. consumer research data) was considered at both the beginning and the end of the process. Cons to consumer involvement included the effect of vested interests on objectivity; consumer disinterest; and complications in terms of time, finance and technical understanding. Pros related to increased credibility and trust in the process.
Stakeholders acknowledged benefits to consumer involvement during the development of dietary guidelines, but remained unclear on the advantage of direct contributions to the scientific content of guidelines. In the absence of established best practice, clarity on the type and reasons for consumer involvement would benefit all actors.
PubMed ID
23182406 View in PubMed
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Development and evaluation of a stand-alone index for the assessment of small children's diet quality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271360
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 Aug;18(11):1941-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Henna Röytiö
Johanna Jaakkola
Ulla Hoppu
Tuija Poussa
Kirsi Laitinen
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 Aug;18(11):1941-9
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Diet - standards
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Nutritive Value
Recommended dietary allowances
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To construct and evaluate an independent Children's Index of Diet Quality (CIDQ).
A food consumption questionnaire, which contained twenty-five multiple-item questions on eating and food intake, was formulated and evaluated against 7 d food records. Key questions that best reflected a healthy diet, defined in criteria set by the nutrient recommendations, were searched and validated by correlation and analyses of receiver-operating characteristic curves. Settings A cohort of a young population of South-West Finland.
Participants (n 400) were 2-6-year-old children.
Fifteen questions were identified to best depict the children's diet quality in reference to the recommendations. These questions were scored, summarized and further constructed into a three-class index (good, moderate and poor dietary quality) where higher scores depicted better diet quality. The CIDQ cut-off score of 14 points for good dietary quality had a sensitivity of 0.59 and a specificity of 0.82 and the cut-off score of 10 points, for at least moderate dietary quality, had a sensitivity of 0.77 and a specificity of 0.69. Higher index scores were related to higher dietary intakes of several vitamins, lower dietary intakes of SFA and cholesterol, and further with lower serum cholesterol and higher serum vitamin C concentrations.
The three-class food index was found to represent diet quality as defined in recommendations and evaluated against nutrient intakes from food diaries and biochemical markers. This self-standing index could provide an effective and low-burden method to obtain information about diet quality and guide future recommendations.
PubMed ID
25584442 View in PubMed
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[Diet and nutrient intake of pregnant women in the capital area in Iceland].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284954
Source
Laeknabladid. 2016 Sep;102(9):378-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Ellen Alma Tryggvadottir
Bryndis Eva Birgisdottir
Thorhallur Ingi Halldorsson
Helga Medek
Reynir Tomas Geirsson
Source
Laeknabladid. 2016 Sep;102(9):378-84
Date
Sep-2016
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Choice Behavior
Diet - adverse effects
Feeding Behavior
Female
Health status
Healthy Diet
Humans
Iceland
Maternal health
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Pregnancy
Recommended dietary allowances
Urban health
Young Adult
Abstract
Nutrition in pregnancy may affect growth, development and health of the child in the short and long term. We aimed to assess diet and nutrient intake among pregnant women in the capital area and evaluate differences in dietary intake between women who were overweight/obese and normal weight before pregnancy.
Pregnant women aged 18-40 years (n=183) living in the capital area kept four day weighed food records to assess diet and nutrient intake in the 19th-24th week of pregnancy (n=98 with body mass index (BMI)
PubMed ID
27646179 View in PubMed
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Dietary composition and nutrient content of the New Nordic Diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119560
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 May;16(5):777-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Charlotte Mithril
Lars Ove Dragsted
Claus Meyer
Inge Tetens
Anja Biltoft-Jensen
Arne Astrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark. Charlotte@madkulturen.dk
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 May;16(5):777-85
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cereals
Denmark
Diet - standards
Dietary Proteins - analysis
Fishes
Fruit
Guidelines as Topic
Health promotion
Humans
Micronutrients - analysis
Nutritional Status
Nuts
Poultry
Recommended dietary allowances
Swine
Vegetables
Abstract
To describe the dietary composition of the New Nordic Diet (NND) and to compare it with the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR)/Danish Food-based Dietary Guidelines (DFDG) and with the average Danish diet.
Dietary components with clear health-promoting properties included in the DFDG were included in the NND in amounts at least equivalent to those prescribed by the DFDG. The quantities of the other dietary components in the NND were based on scientific arguments for their potential health-promoting properties together with considerations of acceptability, toxicological concerns, availability and the environment. Calculations were conducted for quantifying the dietary and nutrient composition of the NND.
Denmark.
None.
The NND is characterized by a high content of fruits and vegetables (especially berries, cabbages, root vegetables and legumes), fresh herbs, potatoes, plants and mushrooms from the wild countryside, whole grains, nuts, fish and shellfish, seaweed, free-range livestock (including pigs and poultry) and game. Overall, the average daily intakes of macro- and micronutrients in the NND meet the NNR with small adjustments based on evidence of their health-promoting properties.
The NND is a prototype regional diet that takes palatability, health, food culture and the environment into consideration. Regionally appropriate healthy diets could be created on similar principles anywhere in the world.
PubMed ID
23089239 View in PubMed
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Dietary intake in Swedish medical students during 2007-2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274426
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2016 Feb;44(1):77-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Ellinor Fredriksson
Hilde Kristin Brekke
Lars Ellegård
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2016 Feb;44(1):77-83
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Male
Recommended dietary allowances
Students, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The dietary intake in Swedish medical students has been reported for the periods 1987-1993 and 1994-2006.
To analyse dietary intake in medical students between 2007 and 2012, in relation to Nordic Nutrition Recommendations, to previous surveys and to a contemporary Swedish population.
Nutrient intake was calculated from 3-day food records conducted by 698 medical students. The differences between surveys were evaluated using a t-test and the changes over time by linear regression.
The energy intake in valid female and male reporters was 8.7 and 11.9 MJ respectively. The intake of protein, fat and alcohol, as proportions of energy (E%) and dietary fibre, was within recommendations. The intake of most micronutrients was above recommendations, except for vitamin D, and in women, iron and folate. In women, E% fat increased between 2007 and 2012, while E% carbohydrate decreased. Compared to the 1994-2006 period, medical students in the present survey consumed less carbohydrates and more fat, more folate and more vitamin E. The students were more compliant with the dietary recommendations than the same age group of the Swedish population.
Energy intake in medical students, and dietary intake with some exceptions, remained stable during 1987-2012, and close to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations for most nutrients. Between 2007 and 2012, fat intake increased and carbohydrate intake decreased significantly in women and also tended to do so in men. Similar trends were seen in the Swedish population, possibly indicating the impact of diet trends such as the Low-Carb/High-Fat diet.
PubMed ID
26487764 View in PubMed
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The dietary intake of Finnish Skolt children

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94104
Source
Pages 135-141 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
here some characteristics of the stumner diet and the find- ings will be compared with the recommended dietary allow- ances in three selected age groups. RESULTS In summer, the consumption of food was less than in winter. The intake of energy varied from 1,070 to 1,970 calories. The children got
  1 document  
Author
Hasunen, K
Pekkarinen, M
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
Source
Pages 135-141 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Calories
Child Nutrition
Dietary survey
Energy intake
Kcal
Nutrients
Proteins
Recommended dietary allowances
Sevettijärvi
Skolt Lapps
Summer diet
Winter diet
Documents
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[Dietary intake of young Icelanders with psychotic disorders and weight development over an 8-12 months period].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285635
Source
Laeknabladid. 2017 Juni;103(6):281-286
Publication Type
Article
Author
Helga Gudrun Fridthjofsdottir
Olof Gudny Geirsdottir
Halldora Jonsdottir
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Inga Thorsdottir
Holmfridur Thorgeirsdottir
Nanna Briem
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Source
Laeknabladid. 2017 Juni;103(6):281-286
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Diet - adverse effects
Diet Records
Feeding Behavior
Female
Healthy Diet
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Nutritional Status
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Recommended dietary allowances
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Time Factors
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
The prevalence of lifestyle related diseases is higher among people with psychotic disorders than the general population. The aim was to assess dietary intake of young people with psychotic disorders for the first time in Iceland.
Subjects were young people (n=48, age 18-30y) with psychotic disorders. Dietary intake was assessed by a 24-hour recall in July-August 2016, and compared with official recommendations and intake of the general public (n=250, age 18-30y). Body weight in the past eight to 12 months, was retrieved from medical records.
Consumption of fruits, fish, dairy products, vegetable and fish oil was significantly lower among subjects when compared with the general public, while their soft drink and sweets consumption was higher (p5% of their initial body weight in the past 8-2 months.
Diet of young people with psychotic disorders is not consistent with recommendations and is worse than the diet of their peers in the general population. It is important to find ways to improve the diet and thereby nutrient intake of the group. Key words: psychotic disorders, schizophrenia, recommended dietary allowances, fatty acids, omega-3, vitamin D. Correspondence: Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir, ingigun@landspitali.is.
PubMed ID
28665288 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.