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Abnormalities of GH secretion in a young girl with Floating-Harbor syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31682
Source
J Endocrinol Invest. 2002 Jan;25(1):58-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
S. Cannavò
L. Bartolone
D. Lapa
M. Venturino
B. Almoto
A. Violi
F. Trimarchi
Author Affiliation
Chair of Endocrinology, University of Messina, Italy. endocrinologi@hotmail.com
Source
J Endocrinol Invest. 2002 Jan;25(1):58-64
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple
Body Height - drug effects
Child
Craniofacial Abnormalities - complications
Female
Growth Disorders - complications - drug therapy - metabolism
Growth Hormone - therapeutic use
Human Growth Hormone - deficiency
Humans
Recombinant Proteins - therapeutic use
Speech Disorders - complications
Syndrome
Abstract
We present a 9.1-year-old girl of Calabrian (Italy) ancestry, with clinical features (cranio-facial dysmorphism, short stature with delayed bone age and speech delay) suggesting the diagnosis of Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS). Physical examination showed: height 113.9 cm (-2.9 SD), with a parent's target of 156.2 cm (+1.0 SD), weight 20.7 kg, BMI 16.0 (-0.04 SD), and many phenotypic abnormalities: long eyelashes, large bulbous nose with broad nasal bridge, short philtrum, moderately broad mouth, tooth folding and malocclusion, posteriorly rotated ears, low posterior hair line, short neck, clinodactyly of the 5th finger and hyperextensible finger joints. Diffused hyperpigmentation and hypertrichosis with sporadic pubic terminal hairs, but neither clitoromegaly nor other signs of hyperandrogenism and/or precocious puberty, were observed (T1, P1). Carpal bone evaluation showed a delayed bone age (TW2: 5-5/10, - 3.6 yr) and the statural age/bone age ratio was 1.1. Other dysmorphic syndromes were excluded on the basis of clinical evidence, also evaluated by a computer-assisted search (P.O.S.S.U.M. version 3.5, 1992). Analysis of chromosome 22 by the FISH method, using specific probes Cos29 and Tuple1, excluded microdeletions in the region 22q11.2, typical of Velo-cardio-facial syndrome. In this case, we report the impairment of serum GH responsiveness (GH baseline values: 0.2-1.9 ng/ml) to the administration of oral 150 microg clonidine [peak 4.7 ng/ml, normal values (nv)>10 ng/ml] and oral 4 mg dexamethasone (8.1 ng/ml, nv>10 ng/ml). Moreover, the evaluation of spontaneous 24-h GH secretion (Carmeda AB, Stockholm, Sweden) showed low mean GH levels (1.75 ng/ml, nv>3.0 ng/ml), with a maximum sleep-related peak of 2.8 ng/ml. Serum IGF-1 values were in the low-normal range (80-176 ng/ml, nv 133-626 ng/ml). While in FHS the cranio-facial features minimize with advancement of age, the impairment of growth velocity is permanent and results in severe dwarfism. In our case, treatment with recombinant GH (0.10 U/kg/day), administered by a needle-free device, induced a dramatic increase of growth velocity, increasing the height from -2.8 to -1.9 SD after 18 months, thus indirectly confirming a role of GH deficiency in the pathogenesis of FHS dwarfism.
PubMed ID
11883867 View in PubMed
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Adjuvant growth hormone treatment during in vitro fertilization: a randomized, placebo-controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64703
Source
Fertil Steril. 1994 Jul;62(1):113-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
C. Bergh
T. Hillensjö
M. Wikland
L. Nilsson
G. Borg
L. Hamberger
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Göteborg, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Fertil Steril. 1994 Jul;62(1):113-20
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjuvants, Pharmaceutic - therapeutic use
Adult
Blood - metabolism
Carrier Proteins - metabolism
Cleavage Stage, Ovum
Female
Fertilization
Fertilization in Vitro
Follicular Fluid - metabolism
Growth Hormone - therapeutic use
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 1
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - metabolism
Ovary - drug effects
Placebos
Recombinant Proteins - therapeutic use
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Somatomedins - metabolism
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To explore the effect of recombinant, human GH on follicular development and oocyte retrieval after gonadotropin stimulation with the addition of GH or placebo to a standard IVF treatment regimen. Further, to investigate whether GH is a more effective adjuvant if the standard treatment regimen is preceded by GH injections. DESIGN: A randomized, double-blind, parallel, placebo-controlled study. SETTING: The IVF unit at university hospital. PATIENTS: Forty normally ovulating women, age 25 to 38 years, with infertility because of tubal factors and being classified as "poor responders" with at least two previously performed and failed IVF attempts. INTERVENTIONS: Human, recombinant GH (Genotropin, Kabi Pharmacia, Uppsala, Sweden) or placebo (0.1 IU/kg body weight per day) was given SC as pretreatment during down regulation with GnRH and during stimulation with hMG according to the randomized protocol. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of oocytes retrieved after stimulation, total amount of gonadotropin used, time required for stimulation, number of follicles developing, rate of fertilization, and cleavage in vitro. Further, the quality of embryos, development of the endometrium, rate of clinical pregnancy, and serum and follicular fluid (FF) concentrations of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), and IGFBP-3 were estimated. RESULTS: The number of oocytes retrieved did not differ significantly between the groups, nor did the amount of hMG required for stimulation. The fertilization rate increased in patients who had received GH. Growth hormone caused a significant increase in serum and FF levels of IGF-I. An increase in serum IGFBP-3 could also be recorded in patients who had received GH. CONCLUSION: Although certain beneficial effects were noted in GH-treated patients, the overall results did not support GH as a clinically useful adjuvant treatment.
PubMed ID
7516295 View in PubMed
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[Antiviral therapy of chronic hepatitis C: 30 years success story].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305446
Source
Ter Arkh. 2019 Nov 15; 91(11):110-115
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-15-2019
Author
D T Abdurakhmanov
T P Rozina
E N Nikulkina
E Z Burnevich
E L Tanashuk
M V Severov
A L Filatova
S Y Milovanova
V V Karpov
S V Moiseev
Author Affiliation
Tareev Clinic of Rheumatology Nephrology and Occupational Disease Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University.
Source
Ter Arkh. 2019 Nov 15; 91(11):110-115
Date
Nov-15-2019
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Hepacivirus
Hepatitis C - drug therapy
Hepatitis C, Chronic - drug therapy
Humans
Polyethylene Glycols - therapeutic use
Recombinant Proteins - therapeutic use
Ribavirin - therapeutic use
Russia
Abstract
Exactly 30 years ago, hepatitis C virus was identified. Over the years, tremendous success has been achieved in the treatment of hepatitis C, which is currently considered to be an almost completely curable disease. The review presents the main stages in the development of hepatitis C antiviral therapy, the efficacy of various treatment regimens. The greatest progress in treatment was noted over the past 5 years when drugs with direct antiviral action appeared and began to be widely used, including in Russia, which ensure the elimination of the virus in 90-95% of cases.
????? 30 ??? ????? ??? ??????????????? ????? ???????? ?. ?? ??? ???? ????????? ???????? ????? ? ??????? ???????? ?, ??????? ? ????????? ????? ??????????????? ??? ??????????? ????????? ????????? ???????????. ? ?????? ???????????? ???????? ????? ??????????? ??????????????? ??????? ???????? ?, ????????????? ????????? ???? ???????. ?????????? ???????? ? ??????? ??????? ? ??????? ????????? 5 ???, ????? ????????? ? ????? ?????? ???????????, ? ??? ????? ? ? ??????, ????????? ? ?????? ??????????????? ?????????, ??????? ???????????? ?????????? ?????? ? 90-95% ???????.
PubMed ID
32598621 View in PubMed
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Benefits of recombinant activated factor VII in complicated liver transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82965
Source
Transplant Proc. 2005 Nov;37(9):3919-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Gala B.
Quintela J.
Aguirrezabalaga J.
Fernández C.
Fraguela J.
Suárez F.
Gómez M.
Author Affiliation
Transplant Unit, Juan Canalejo University Hospital, La Coruña, Spain. gala32486@yahoo.com
Source
Transplant Proc. 2005 Nov;37(9):3919-21
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Factor VIIa - therapeutic use
Hemophilia A - surgery
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - surgery
Liver Transplantation
Prothrombin Time
Recombinant Proteins - therapeutic use
Thrombopoietin - analysis
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa, NovoSeven, NovoNordiskA/S, Bagsvaerd, Denmark) has shown benefits in hemophilic patients and recently in transplant recipients. This study presents our experiences with rFVIIa in complicated liver transplant recipients. METHODS: From May 2001 to August 2004, rFVIIa was administered to 7 patients undergoing liver transplantation. All treatments were made on emergency bases, except for 1 case with hemophilia A, who received prophylactic treatment. The drug was delivered when severe bleeding with coagulopathy persisted despite the usual treatment with blood products. The drug doses were 60-90 mug/kg; the results were evaluated clinically and analytically. RESULTS: Seven patients undergoing liver transplantation were treated with FVIIa. Mean prothrombin times before and after treatment were 17.5 and 10.9 seconds, respectively, with a mean reduction of 7.2 seconds (P = .03). Mean thromboplastin times before and after treatment were 38.1 and 29.4 seconds, respectively, with a mean reduction of 8.7 seconds (P = .034). The average dose was 83.6 mug/kg, leading to decreased consumption of blood products (P
PubMed ID
16386584 View in PubMed
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Biosynthetic human growth hormone treatment in the UK: an audit of current practice. Kabi Pharmacia International Growth Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35665
Source
Arch Dis Child. 1994 Sep;71(3):266-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994

Bivalirudin versus heparin with primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299494
Source
Am Heart J. 2018 07; 201:9-16
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2018
Author
Dimitrios Venetsanos
Sofia Sederholm Lawesson
Stefan James
Sasha Koul
David Erlinge
Eva Swahn
Joakim Alfredsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. Electronic address: dimitrios.venetsanos@liu.se.
Source
Am Heart J. 2018 07; 201:9-16
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Antithrombins - therapeutic use
Cause of Death - trends
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Restenosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Heparin - therapeutic use
Hirudins
Humans
Incidence
Male
Peptide Fragments - therapeutic use
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - methods
Recombinant Proteins - therapeutic use
Registries
Retrospective Studies
ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - surgery
Stents
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Optimal adjunctive therapy in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients treated with primary PCI (PPCI) remains a matter of debate. Our aim was to compare the efficacy and safety of bivalirudin to unfractionated heparin (UFH), with or without glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (GPI) in a large real-world population, using data from the Swedish national registry, SWEDEHEART.
From 2008 to 2014 we identified 23,800 STEMI patients presenting within 12?hours from symptom onset treated with PPCI and UFH?±?GPI or bivalirudin±GPI. Primary outcomes included 30-day all-cause mortality and major in-hospital bleeding. Multivariable regression models and propensity score modelling were utilized to study adjusted association between treatment and outcome.
Treatment with UFH?±?GPI was associated with similar risk of 30-day mortality compared to bivalirudin±GPI (5.3% vs 5.5%, adjusted HR 0.94; 95% CI 0.82-1.07). The adjusted risk for 1-year mortality, 30-day and 1-year stent thrombosis and re-infarction did not differ significantly between UFH?±?GPI and bivalirudin±GPI. In contrast, treatment with UFH?±?GPI was associated with a significant higher risk of major in-hospital bleeding (adjusted OR 1.62; 95% CI 1.30-2.03). When including GPI use in the multivariable analysis, the difference was attenuated and no longer significant (adjusted OR 1.25; 95% CI 0.92-1.70).
Bivalirudin±GPI was associated with significantly lower risk for major inhospital bleeding but no significant difference in 30-day or one year mortality, stent thrombosis or re-infarction compared with UFH?±?GPI. The bleeding reduction associated with bivalirudin could be explained by the greater GPI use with UFH.
PubMed ID
29910059 View in PubMed
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Clinical experience with Genotropin in growth hormone deficient children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38704
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1988;343:95-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
P. Wilton
R. Gunnarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Research, KabiVitrum Peptide Hormones, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1988;343:95-101
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Height - drug effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Clinical Trials
Female
Growth Disorders - drug therapy
Growth Hormone - deficiency - therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Multicenter Studies
Recombinant Proteins - therapeutic use
Abstract
The efficacy of Genotropin (recombinant somatropin, KabiVitrum AB, Sweden) was analysed in 194 children with GH deficiency, comprising a combined series of four multicentre trials. The linear height velocity increased from 3.3 +/- 1.4 to 9.3 +/- 2.6 cm/year in 149 prepubertal children with 12 months' data available. In 18 pubertal children the pretreatment height velocity was 4.0 +/- 1.2, and increased to 8.4 +/- 1.7 cm/year during 12 months of treatment. There was a positive correlation between the gain in height velocity and the weekly dose of Genotropin. Covariance analysis revealed significantly greater height velocity with 6-7 injections/week compared to 2-3 injections/week; corrections for chronological age, bone age, height SD score and dose were made. On average, a regimen of 6-7 injections/week was 25% more effective than one of 2-3 injections/week corresponding to an extra gain in height velocity of 1.8 +/- 0.6 cm/year. At 12 months, only 0.9% of the children had developed anti-GH antibodies. Very few side-effects have been reported from more than 1000 children on Genotropin.
PubMed ID
3057810 View in PubMed
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Clinical experience with Genotropin worldwide: an update March 1987.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39059
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1987;337:147-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
R. Gunnarsson
P. Wilton
Author Affiliation
Medical Department, KabiVitrum Peptide Hormones, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1987;337:147-52
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Height
Child
Clinical Trials
Female
Growth Disorders - drug therapy
Growth Hormone - deficiency - therapeutic use
Hormones - therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Recombinant Proteins - therapeutic use
Time Factors
Abstract
The efficacy and safety of Genotropin (recombinant somatropin, KabiVitrum AB, Sweden) was analysed in 199 children with hGH deficiency, comprising a combined series of four current multicentre trials. Stimulation of linear growth from pretreatment height velocities of 3-4 cm/year to about 10 cm/year was observed after 6 and 9 months of treatment. Statistical analysis revealed significantly greater height velocities (by 2-3 cm/year) when the weekly dose of the hormone was given in 6-7 injections rather than in 3 injections. Immunogenicity seems to be very low, with only about 2% of the children having detectable antibodies during treatment.
PubMed ID
3324636 View in PubMed
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Comparison of the activity profiles of two fixed combinations of regular/NPH human insulin (recombinant DNA) of different compositions with a fixed regular/NPH porcine insulin combination (PPI) in insulin-dependent diabetic individuals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48930
Source
Diabetes Care. 1982 Nov-Dec;5 Suppl 2:57-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
D. Sailer
T. Ludwig
S. Kolb
Source
Diabetes Care. 1982 Nov-Dec;5 Suppl 2:57-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Blood glucose
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - drug therapy
Double-Blind Method
Drug Combinations
Female
Humans
Insulin - therapeutic use
Insulin, Isophane - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Recombinant Proteins - therapeutic use
Swine
Abstract
In a randomized double-blind crossover study, 10 insulin-dependent diabetic individuals were treated with a commercial brand of neutral, highly purified porcine insulin (PPI) with 30% regular and 70% NPH fractions (Mixtard, Nordisk, Denmark), and with human insulins (recombinant DNA) with 20% regular and 80% NPH fractions, and with 30% regular and 70% NPH fractions. Each of the preparations was given for 4 consecutive days. The human insulin combination with the 20% regular and 80% NPH components showed a similar activity profile as the PPI 30/70 combination. In contrast, the human insulin combination with the 30% regular and 70% NPH fractions produced substantially lower blood sugar concentrations with the associated risk of hypoglycemia.
PubMed ID
6765542 View in PubMed
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80 records – page 1 of 8.