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166 records – page 1 of 17.

A 1-year evaluation of Syva MicroTrak Chlamydia enzyme immunoassay with selective confirmation by direct fluorescent-antibody assay in a high-volume laboratory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217461
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1994 Sep;32(9):2208-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
E L Chan
K. Brandt
G B Horsman
Author Affiliation
Laboratory and Disease Control Services, Saskatchewan Health, Regina, Canada.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1994 Sep;32(9):2208-11
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Chlamydia Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - immunology - isolation & purification
Cost Control
Densitometry
Diagnostic Tests, Routine - economics
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Fluorescent Antibody Technique - economics
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques - economics
Male
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Seasons
Sensitivity and specificity
Urethritis - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Uterine Cervicitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
TThe Syva MicroTrak Chlamydia enzyme immunoassay (EIA; Syva Company, San Jose, Calif.) with cytospin and direct fluorescent-antibody assay (DFA) confirmation was evaluated on 43,630 urogenital specimens over a 1-year period in the Provincial Laboratory in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. This was a two-phase study intended to define a testing algorithm for Chlamydia trachomatis that would be both highly accurate and cost-effective in our high-volume (> 3,000 tests per month) laboratory. The prevalence of C. trachomatis infection in our population is moderate (8 to 9%). In phase 1, we tested 6,022 male and female urogenital specimens by EIA. All specimens with optical densities above the cutoff value and those within 30% below the cutoff value were retested by DFA. This was 648 specimens (10.8% of the total). A total of 100% (211 of 211) of the specimens with optical densities equal to or greater than 1.00 absorbance unit (AU) above the cutoff value, 98.2% (175 of 178) of the specimens with optical densities of between 0.500 and 0.999 AU above the cutoff value, and 83% (167 of 201) of the specimens with optical densities within 0.499 AU above the cutoff value were confirmed to be positive. A total of 12% (7 of 58) of the specimens with optical densities within 30% below the cutoff value were positive by DFA. In phase 2, we tested 37,608 specimens (32,495 from females; 5,113 from males) by EIA. Only those specimens with optical densities of between 0.499 AU above and 30% below the cutoff value required confirmation on the basis of data from phase 1 of the study. This was 4.5% of all specimens tested. This decrease in the proportion of specimens requiring confirmation provides a significant cost savings to the laboratory. The testing algorithm gives us a 1-day turnaround time to the final confirmed test results. The MicroTrak EIA performed very well in both phases of the study, with a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 96.1, 99.1, 90.3, and 99.7%, respectively, in phase 2. We suggest that for laboratories that use EIA for Chlamydia testing, a study such as this one will identify an appropriate optical density range for confirmatory testing for samples from that particular population.
Notes
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 1983;5:96-1236357824
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1993 Jun;31(6):1646-78315010
Cites: Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 1992 Nov-Dec;15(8):663-81478048
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1990 Nov;28(11):2473-62254422
PubMed ID
7814548 View in PubMed
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A 25-year follow-up of a population screened with faecal occult blood test in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161415
Source
Acta Oncol. 2007;46(8):1103-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Nea Malila
Matti Hakama
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Liisankatu 21 B, FI-001 70 Helsinki, Finland. nea.malila@cancer.fi
Source
Acta Oncol. 2007;46(8):1103-6
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Feasibility Studies
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Occult Blood
Patient compliance
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess the feasibility of and possible selection to attend in colorectal cancer screening.
During the years 1979-1980, 1 785 men and women (born in 1917-1929) were invited to a pilot screening project for colorectal cancer. The screening method used was a guaiac-based faecal occult blood test repeated once if the initial test was positive.
Compliance was 69% and the test was positive in 19% of those attending. In a record linkage with the Finnish Cancer Registry, 47 colorectal cancer cases and 24 deaths from colorectal cancer were observed by the end of 2004. In all, the particular test method was not regarded specific enough for population screening. There was, however, no difference in cancer incidence between those who complied and those who did not when compared to the general population of same age and gender.
Compliance was found high enough to make screening feasible and there was no self selection of persons with low cancer risk to attend screening.
PubMed ID
17851857 View in PubMed
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[A comparative evaluation of the diagnostic value of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide and rheumatoid factor in rheumatoid arthritis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93534
Source
Korean J Lab Med. 2008 Feb;28(1):39-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Cho Sun Young
Kang So Young
Lee Hee Joo
Lee Woo In
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, East-West Neo-Medical Center, School of Medicine, Kyung-Hee University, Seoul, Korea.
Source
Korean J Lab Med. 2008 Feb;28(1):39-45
Date
Feb-2008
Language
Korean
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis
Autoantibodies - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Peptides, Cyclic - immunology
ROC Curve
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Rheumatoid Factor - blood
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Despite its unsatisfactory specificity, rheumatoid factor (RF) is the only serologic marker included in the diagnostic criteria of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) for rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, the diagnostic value of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies has been emphasized in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) due to its high specificity. To evaluate the second generation of anti-CCP antibodies as a diagnostic marker, we evaluated anti-CCP test in 163 individuals. METHODS: The study population was divided into the following four groups: RA group (n=18), other disease group with arthritic symptoms (n=44), other disease group without arthritic symptoms (n=45), and healthy group (n=56). Anti-CCP was measured by an ELISA analyzer (Coda, Bio-Rad, USA) with Immunoscan RA (Euro-Diagnostica, Malmo, Sweden) and RF was measured by an automated chemistry analyzer (Toshiba, Japan) with RF-LATEX X1 (Denka Seiken, Japan). RESULTS: The sensitivity of anti-CCP and RF was 72.2% and 100%, respectively, and the respective figures for the specificity were 96.6% and 73%. On each ROC curve, the area under the curve was 0.867 for anti-CCP and 0.959 for RF. In other disease groups, most of the false positive cases of RF were found in the patients with hyperlipidemia or HBV carriage. However, anti-CCP was not detected in any of the patients with these two conditions. False positive rates of RF in the three control groups were 34.1% in other disease group with arthritic symptoms, 48.9% in the other disease group without arthritic symptoms, and 3.6% in healthy group. The respective figures for anti-CCP were 6.8%, 2.2%, and 1.8%. CONCLUSIONS: The specificity of anti-CCP antibodies was higher than that of RF for discriminating RA from other diseases, especially in the patients with hyperlipidemia or HBV carriage. With its high specificity, anti-CCP antibodies can play an additive role in establishing the diagnosis of RA in patients with RF positivity.
PubMed ID
18309254 View in PubMed
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[A method for determining plasminogen with a Russian chromogenic substrate and its diagnostic significance].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198019
Source
Klin Lab Diagn. 2000 Mar;(3):21-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
A P Momot
A N Mamaev
Z S Barkagan
O E Nevedrova
V A Makarov
T L Voiushina
D N Erin
Source
Klin Lab Diagn. 2000 Mar;(3):21-4
Date
Mar-2000
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Burns - blood - diagnosis
Chromogenic Compounds - diagnostic use
Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation - blood - diagnosis
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Germany
Humans
Middle Aged
Plasminogen - analysis
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Reference Values
Russia
Shock, Traumatic - blood - diagnosis
Toxemia - blood - diagnosis
Abstract
Measurement of plasminogen, the key component of fibrinolysis system, is one of the basic methods for estimation of fibrinolysis. Methods based on the use of chromogenic substrates are often used in diagnosis. Plasminogen measurements are important for laboratory diagnosis of thrombophilia caused by deficiency or abnormalities of this fiber, for detection and evaluation of the DIC syndrome, and for monitoring the treatment by fibrinolytic preparations (streptokinase, t-PA, urokinase, etc.). An original chromogenic substrate having no foreign analogs has been created at Institute of Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms and Research Center of Hematology (Moscow). Unlike previously described plasmin substrates, pNa has been obtained by microbiological methods with Russian commercial enzymes subtilisine 72 and megaterine. This paper presents the results of plasminogen measurements in patients with DIC with the use of the original chromogenic substrate. The results were compared with those of tests with Berihrom-Plasminogen diagnostic kit (Behringwerke AG).
PubMed ID
10878927 View in PubMed
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Amplicor HIV monitor, NASBA HIV-1 RNA QT and quantiplex HIV RNA version 2.0 viral load assays: a Canadian evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203199
Source
J Clin Virol. 1998 Dec;11(3):189-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
I T Prud'homme
J E Kim
R G Pilon
T. Minkus
N. Hawley-Foss
W. Cameron
E W Rud
Author Affiliation
National Laboratory for HIV Reference Services, Bureau of HIV/AIDS, STD and TB, LCDC, HPB, Health Canada, Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Clin Virol. 1998 Dec;11(3):189-202
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Canada
Female
Flow Cytometry
HIV Infections - blood - diagnosis - virology
HIV Seropositivity
HIV-1 - isolation & purification
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
RNA, Viral - analysis
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Viral Load
Virology - methods
Abstract
HIV-1 viral load quantitation is now recognized as a useful tool to monitor the efficiency of antiviral treatment and a powerful predictor of disease outcome. Three HIV-1 viral load quantitation methods have been currently available as commercial kits in Canada since 1996.
To evaluate the ability to quantify HIV-1 RNA in plasma of the Amplicor HIV Monitor Test, the NASBA HIV-1 RNA QT Assay and the Quantiplex HIV RNA Assay, version 2.0, at comparable lower detection limits.
Blood was collected from 50 HIV-1-infected patients at various stages of infection and therapy. CD4+ cell count were estimated by flow cytometry. Plasma was isolated and tested in duplicate on four occasions using viral load kits from a single lot. HIV RNA data, performance, sensitivity and intra- and inter-assay variability were compared.
RNA could be quantified in 33 patients by each technique. An inverse correlation was observed between viral load level and CD4+ cell counts in patients with counts below 200. Monitor could detect RNA in 94% of patients, but it showed the greatest variability and failure rate. Quantiplex 2.0 could detect HIV-1 RNA in 78%, and NASBA in 88% of the patients at theoretically equivalent lower detection limits, suggesting that the detection limit of Quantiplex 2.0 may be higher than 500 HIV-1 RNA copies per ml. NASBA had the fewest invalid tests and good reproducibility, comparable to that of Quantiplex 2.0. The mean values from NASBA and Monitor were the most similar but the best correlation was observed between Monitor and Quantiplex 2.0 results.
Monitor, NASBA and Quantiplex results were comparable, although those obtained by Quantiplex were significantly lower. Performing this study at comparable detection limits showed that the detection limit of Quantiplex 2.0 may be higher than stated by the manufacturer.
PubMed ID
9949955 View in PubMed
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Analytical and clinical validation of novel real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assays for the clinical detection of swine-origin H1N1 influenza viruses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137754
Source
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011 Feb;69(2):167-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Carla Duncan
Jennifer L Guthrie
Nathalie Tijet
Naglaa Elgngihy
Christine Turenne
Christine Seah
Rachel Lau
Lisa McTaggart
Gustavo Mallo
Stephen Perusini
Anu Rebbapragada
Roberto Melano
Donald E Low
David Farrell
Cyril Guyard
Author Affiliation
Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion (OAHPP), 81 Resources Road, Toronto, Ontario, M9P 3T1, Canada.
Source
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011 Feb;69(2):167-71
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - genetics
Influenza, Human - diagnosis - virology
Ontario
RNA, Viral - genetics
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Reproducibility of Results
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
During the early stages of the 2009/2010 swine-origin H1N1 influenza A (S-OIV H1N1 FluA) outbreak, the development and validation of sensitive and specific detection methods were a priority for rapid and accurate diagnosis. Between May and June 2009, 2 real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assays targeting the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of the S-OIV H1N1 FluA virus were developed. These assays are highly specific, showing no cross-reactivity against a panel of respiratory viruses and can differentiate S-OIV H1N1 from seasonal FluA viruses. Analytical sensitivities of the 2 assays were found to be 10(-1) tissue culture infectious dose, 50%/ml. Clinical testing showed 99.2% sensitivity and 94.6-98.1% specificity. A large prospective analysis showed that 94.8-95.5% of S-OIV positive specimens were negative by seasonal H1/H3 subtyping. The large-scale validation data presented in this report indicate that these novel assays provide an accurate and efficient method for the rapid detection of S-OIV H1N1 FluA viruses.
PubMed ID
21251560 View in PubMed
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Analytical and diagnostic accuracy of the EliA automated enzyme fluoroimmunoassay for antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody detection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13774
Source
Clin Chem Lab Med. 2004;42(10):1161-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Danilo Villalta
Elio Tonutti
Marilina Tampoia
Nicola Bizzaro
Wolfgang Papisch
Renato Tozzoli
Sergio Stella
Author Affiliation
Immunologia Clinica e Virologia, Azienda Ospedaliera Santa Maria degli Angeli, Via Montereale 24, 33170 Pordenone, Italy. danilo.villalta@aopn.fvg.it
Source
Clin Chem Lab Med. 2004;42(10):1161-7
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic - blood - immunology
Comparative Study
Connective Tissue Diseases - blood - diagnosis - immunology
Diagnosis, Differential
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay - methods
Female
Fluoroimmunoassay - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Peroxidase - blood - immunology
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Sensitivity and specificity
Vasculitis - blood - diagnosis - immunology
Wegener's Granulomatosis - blood - diagnosis - immunology
Abstract
Anti-proteinase 3 antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (PR3-ANCA) and anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies (MPO-ANCA) are considered important serological markers for several forms of idiopathic systemic vasculitis. The aim of the study was to verify the analytical and clinical performance of a new automated enzyme fluoroimmunoassay, the EliA system, for PR3-ANCA and MPO-ANCA detection. For this purpose the sera of 52 consecutive well-defined patients with a clinical diagnosis of Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) (n=29) or microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) (n=23), and 70 controls suffering from connective tissue disease (25 systemic lupus erythematosus, 25 Sjögren's syndrome and 20 rheumatoid arthritis) were tested for PR3-ANCA and MPO-ANCA with the EliA assay (Pharmacia Diagnostics, Freiburg, Germany). For comparison purposes, the same sera were also tested by indirect immunofluorescence, another direct immunometric assay (Varelisa, Pharmacia Diagnostics) and a capture PR3-ANCA (Wieslab AB, Lund, Sweden) method. Both the EliA PR3-ANCA and MPO-ANCA assays showed between- and within-assay precision of
PubMed ID
15552276 View in PubMed
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An indigenous leucocyte esterase test along with Pandy's test for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192424
Source
Indian Pediatr. 2001 Nov;38(11):1281-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
R K Srivastava
S. Gupta
M. Bhargava
N. Kumar
P. Upadhyay
J M Puliyel
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, St. Stephen's Hospital, Tis Hazari, Delhi 110 054, India.
Source
Indian Pediatr. 2001 Nov;38(11):1281-6
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carboxylic Ester Hydrolases - cerebrospinal fluid
Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteins - analysis
Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
Infant
Meningitis, Bacterial - cerebrospinal fluid - diagnosis
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Sensitivity and specificity
Notes
Comment In: Indian Pediatr. 2002 Jun;39(6):602-3; author reply 603-412084964
PubMed ID
11721069 View in PubMed
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An indigenous leucocyte esterase test along with Pandy's test for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189592
Source
Indian Pediatr. 2002 Jun;39(6):602-3; author reply 603-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002

Antibody against hepatitis A in Saudi Arabians and in expatriates from various parts of the world working in Saudi Arabia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39282
Source
J Infect. 1986 Mar;12(2):153-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1986
Author
S. Ramia
Source
J Infect. 1986 Mar;12(2):153-5
Date
Mar-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Blood Donors
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Egypt - ethnology
Female
Great Britain - ethnology
Hepatitis A - epidemiology - immunology
Hepatitis A Antibodies
Hepatitis Antibodies - analysis
Hepatovirus - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Immunoglobulin M - analysis
Infant
Male
Philippines - ethnology
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Saudi Arabia
Sweden - ethnology
Yemen - ethnology
Abstract
The age-specific rate of exposure to hepatitis A virus (HAV) was studied in 1015 native Saudi Arabians (504 males, 511 females) from the Riyadh area. The relatively high prevalence of antibody to HAV (anti-HAV) (38.6%) in children between 1 and 4 years of age indicates that infection is acquired early in life in the Saudi Arabian population. The prevalence of anti-HAV was found to increase steadily so that by the age of 30 years 91.0% of Saudi Arabians have anti-HAV. The prevalence in adult Saudi Arabians was compared with that in expatriates from various parts of the world working in Saudi Arabia. It was lowest among Swedish (10.7-12.3%) and highest among Yemeni (94.5%) blood donors while British blood donors were intermediate same among Saudi Arabian, Yemeni, Egyptian and Filipino blood donors (91.0-94.5%). All the donors tested were of the same age group (20-35 years).
PubMed ID
3009629 View in PubMed
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166 records – page 1 of 17.