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A 5-year prospective case-control study of the influence of early otitis media with effusion on reading achievement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39755
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1984 Oct;8(1):19-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1984
Author
J. Lous
M. Fiellau-Nikolajsen
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1984 Oct;8(1):19-30
Date
Oct-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Impedance Tests
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology
Otitis Media with Effusion - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Reading
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In a still ongoing prospective longitudinal study, more than 500 children--a total birth-cohort in a Danish municipality--were followed from their 3rd to their 9th year of life by multiple impedance tests in order to investigate a number of factors concerning epidemiology and long-term impacts of otitis media with effusion. This is a report on the influence of otitis media with effusion early in life on reading achievement. The study revealed no difference in school-class level between the 9% of the children (n = 46) who constantly had abnormal tympanometry during a 6-month period at the age of 3, and the other pupils in the municipality. At the Silent Reading Test (OS-400), done on 40 of the 46 case-pupils the results did not differ from (1) the other pupils in the municipality, (2) from other pupils of the same sex in the same classroom, or (3) from individual control-pupils matched by sex, social group and classroom.
PubMed ID
6542073 View in PubMed
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Academic Achievement of University Students with Dyslexia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274081
Source
Dyslexia. 2015 Nov;21(4):338-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Åke Olofsson
Karin Taube
Astrid Ahl
Source
Dyslexia. 2015 Nov;21(4):338-49
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adult
Computer-Assisted Instruction
Dyslexia - diagnosis - psychology
Education, Nursing
Education, Special
Female
Humans
Internet
Male
Multilingualism
Reading
Sweden
Teaching
Universities
Writing
Young Adult
Abstract
Broadened recruitment to higher education is on the agenda in many countries, and it is also widely recognized that the number of dyslexic students entering higher education is increasing. In Sweden, as in many other European countries, higher education institutions are required to accommodate students with dyslexia. The present study focuses on the study outcome for 50 students with diagnosed dyslexia, mainly in teacher education and nurses' training, at three universities in Northern Sweden. The students trusted their own ability to find information on the Internet but mistrusted their own abilities in reading course books and articles in English and in taking notes. The mean rate of study was 23.5 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System credits per semester, which is slightly below the national baseline of 26.7. The results show that more than half of the students are examined at a normal rate of study but that about one fifth have a very low rate of study. Messages Most students with dyslexia can compensate for their reading problems. Taking notes during lessons and reading in foreign language may be especially difficult for students with dyslexia. Diagnoses should distinguish between reading comprehension and word decoding. More than half of the students with dyslexia can achieve at a normal rate of study. One-fifth of the students with dyslexia may need a longer period of study than other students.
PubMed ID
26459832 View in PubMed
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ADCS Prevention Instrument Project: pilot testing of a book club as a psychosocial intervention and recruitment and retention strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79594
Source
Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2006 Oct-Dec;20(4 Suppl 3):S203-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Whitehouse Peter J
Rajcan Julia L
Sami Susie A
Patterson Marian B
Smyth Kathleen A
Edland Steven D
George Daniel R
Author Affiliation
University Memory and Aging Center, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44120-1013, USA. peter.whitehouse@case.edu
Source
Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2006 Oct-Dec;20(4 Suppl 3):S203-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Bibliotherapy
Female
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Patient Dropouts - psychology
Patient satisfaction
Patient Selection
Pilot Projects
Primary Prevention
Reading
Social Environment
United States
Abstract
Both psychosocial and biologic interventions may delay or prevent Alzheimer disease. Staying mentally active may help older people maintain their cognitive abilities. In the Alzheimer Disease Cooperative Study Prevention Instrument Project a book club was introduced as a recruitment and retention device. A 3-arm study was designed and included: a nonrandomized, self-selected group (n=211) who chose not to participate in the book club, and 2 groups randomly assigned to receive 2 books per year in individual self-improvement (n=210) or community involvement (n=207) categories. Participants reported their reactions to the selections and other reading behaviors. Results from the first 2 years revealed that most book club participants agreed with Likert-type statements indicating the readings were enjoyable (P
PubMed ID
17135813 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' attention to traditional and graphic tobacco warning labels: an eye-tracking approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137126
Source
J Drug Educ. 2010;40(3):227-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Emily Bylund Peterson
Steven Thomsen
Gordon Lindsay
Kevin John
Author Affiliation
Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, USA. steven_thomsen@byu.edu
Source
J Drug Educ. 2010;40(3):227-44
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Attention
Canada
Female
Fixation, Ocular
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Pattern Recognition, Visual
Product Labeling
Reading
Smoking - adverse effects - psychology
Smoking Cessation - psychology
United States
Abstract
The objective of this study was determine if the inclusion of Canadian-style graphic images would improve the degree to which adolescents attend to, and subsequently are able to recall, novel warning messages in tobacco magazine advertising. Specifically, our goal was to determine if the inclusion of graphic images would (1) increase visual attention, as measured by eye movement patterns and fixation density, and (2) improve memory for tobacco advertisements among a group of 12 to 14 year olds in the western United States. Data were collected from 32 middle school students using a head-mounted eye-tracking device that recorded viewing time, scan path patterns, fixation locations, and dwell time. Participants viewed a series of 20 magazine advertisements that included five U.S. tobacco ads with traditional Surgeon General warning messages and five U.S. tobacco ads that had been modified to include non-traditional messages and Canadian-style graphic images. Following eye tracking, participants completed unaided- and aided-recall exercises. Overall, the participants spent equal amounts of time viewing the advertisements regardless of the type of warning message. However, the warning messages that included the graphic images generated higher levels of visual attention directed specifically toward the message, based on average dwell time and fixation frequency, and were more likely to be accurately recalled than the traditional warning messages.
PubMed ID
21313984 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' school-related self-concept mediates motor skills and psychosocial well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104309
Source
Br J Educ Psychol. 2014 Jun;84(Pt 2):268-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Helena Viholainen
Tuija Aro
Jarno Purtsi
Asko Tolvanen
Marja Cantell
Author Affiliation
Special Education Unit, Department of Education, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
Br J Educ Psychol. 2014 Jun;84(Pt 2):268-80
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological - physiology
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Mathematics
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Motor Skills - physiology
Peer Group
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Reading
Self Concept
Self Report
Social Behavior
Abstract
The health benefits of exercise participation and physical activity for mental health and psychosocial well-being (PSWB) have been shown in several studies. However, one important background factor, that is, motor skills (MSs), has largely been ignored. In addition, most of the existing research focuses on poor MSs, that is, poor MSs are often connected to poorer PSWB. The mechanism linking MSs and PSWB is unclear. However, a preliminary suggestion has been made that self-worth or self-perceptions might mediate the association between MSs and PSWB.
We investigated whether the self-concepts (SCs) of school-related physical education (SCPE), reading (SCR), and mathematics (SCM) mediate the relationship between MSs and PSWB in adolescence.
The study sample consisted of a second-grade female cohort (N = 327), ranging in age between 12 and 16 (years) in a municipality in Central Finland. PSWB was measured by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and the school-related SCs by the SC of ability scale adapted for use in Finland. MSs was assessed by a self-reported adolescent version of the Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire. Structural mediator modelling was used to test the associations between MSs and PSWB with SC as a mediator.
First, MSs was strongly associated with school-related SCPE and SCM. However, a mediator role was observed only for SCPE, which weakly mediated peer problems. Second, MSs and PSWB, especially conduct problems, showed a very strong direct association.
The study suggests that MSs is connected to PSWB in adolescent girls. Enhancement of MSs could be a preventive strategy for supporting PSWB in adolescent girls.
PubMed ID
24829120 View in PubMed
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The Adult Reading History Questionnaire (ARHQ) in Icelandic: Psychometric Properties and Factor Structure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267316
Source
J Learn Disabil. 2014 Nov-Dec;47(6):532-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gyda Bjornsdottir
Jonas G Halldorsson
Stacy Steinberg
Ingunn Hansdottir
Kristleifur Kristjansson
Hreinn Stefansson
Kari Stefansson
Source
J Learn Disabil. 2014 Nov-Dec;47(6):532-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dyslexia - diagnosis
Humans
Iceland
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Questionnaires - standards
Reading
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
This article describes psychometric testing of an Icelandic adaptation of the Adult Reading History Questionnaire (ARHQ), designed to detect a history of reading difficulties indicative of dyslexia. Tested in a large and diverse sample of 2,187 adults, the Icelandic adaptation demonstrated internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = .92) and test-retest reliability (r = .93). Validity was established by comparing scores of adults who as children received ICD-10 diagnoses of specific reading disorder (F81.0; n = 419) to those of adults defined as nondyslexics (n = 679). ROC curve analysis resulted in an area under the curve of .92 (95% CI = .90, .93, p
PubMed ID
23456983 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 1969 Jul 11;94(28):1462-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-11-1969
Author
K G Islar
Source
Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 1969 Jul 11;94(28):1462-3
Date
Jul-11-1969
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Dyslexia
Europe
Humans
Learning
Methods
Reading
United States
PubMed ID
5786048 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of the Nucleotide Sequence of a Cryptic Plasmid from Yersinia pestis Strains in the Central Caucasian High-Mountain Plague Focus].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268183
Source
Genetika. 2015 Jul;51(7):754-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
E G Oglodin
A V Cherkasov
G A Eroshenko
G N Odinokov
N Yu Shavina
L A Novichkova
V V Kutyrev
Source
Genetika. 2015 Jul;51(7):754-8
Date
Jul-2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Base Composition
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Open Reading Frames
Phylogeny
Plague - microbiology
Plasmids - genetics
Russia
Yersinia pestis - genetics - pathogenicity
Abstract
An analysis of a 5.4-kbp cryptic plasmid detected in the course of whole-genome sequencing of the Yersinia pestis medieval biovar isolated in the Russian Central Caucasian high-mountain plague focus was performed. The identification of the nucleotide sequence of this cryptic plasmid and its structural and functional analysis revealed that it contained eight open reading frames, among which the following genes were identified: the rep gene of a replication protein, the virB6 gene of a type-IV secretion system inner membrane protein, the virB5gene of the type-IV secretion system minor pilin, and a number of genes probably associated with secretion and transport. A general analysis of the pCKF plasmid DNA showed that the adenine content was 28.34%, the cytosine content was 20.5%, the guanine content was 17.87%, and that of thymine was 33.28%, while the total G+C content appeared to be 38.38%. The G+C content of the chromosome of the Y pestis strain C-627 is 47.6%, which indicates that the pCKF plasmid was obtained from a microorganism equally-phylogenetically distant from the Yersinia bacteria andany other bacteria from the Enterobacteriaceae family. A comparison of the amino acid sequences.of hypothetical proteins encoded by pCKF plasmid with analogous proteins encoded by other bacteria was carried out. The possible contribution of the pCKF plasmid to the maintenance of the most ancient known phylogenetic line of Y. pestis medieval biovar, 2.MEDO, was discussed.
PubMed ID
26410928 View in PubMed
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Analytical performance of norovirus real-time RT-PCR detection protocols in Canadian laboratories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139366
Source
J Clin Virol. 2011 Feb;50(2):109-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Kirsten Mattison
Elsie Grudeski
Brian Auk
Julie Brassard
Hugues Charest
Kerry Dust
Jonathan Gubbay
Todd F Hatchette
Alain Houde
Julie Jean
Tineke Jones
Bonita E Lee
Hiroshi Mamiya
Ryan McDonald
Oksana Mykytczuk
Xiaoli Pang
Astrid Petrich
Daniel Plante
Gordon Ritchie
Julie Wong
Tim F Booth
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Microbial Hazards, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
Source
J Clin Virol. 2011 Feb;50(2):109-13
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Base Sequence
Caliciviridae Infections - diagnosis - virology
Canada
Feces - virology
Gastroenteritis - diagnosis - virology
Genotype
Humans
Limit of Detection
Norovirus - genetics - isolation & purification
Open Reading Frames
RNA, Viral - analysis - genetics
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Abstract
Noroviruses (NoVs) are the leading cause of infectious gastroenteritis worldwide. Real-time reverse transcription PCR (real-time RT-PCR) is the preferred method of NoV detection for the majority of testing laboratories. Although the accepted target region for molecular detection assays is the conserved ORF1/ORF2 junction, multiple variations have been published with differences in primers, probes, reagents, multiplexing, etc.
We assessed the detection limit for GII.4 NoV real-time RT-PCR assays as well as the ability to detect the non-GII.4 NoV genotypes in each participating laboratory.
A panel of 25 RNA samples was circulated to 18 testing laboratories for comparison of their real-time RT-PCR procedures for NoV detection.
Multiple protocols with slight differences in reagents or conditions successfully detected 10 genome equivalents or fewer of NoV per reaction. Multiplex procedures were significantly associated (p=0.04) with false negative results, particularly for a GI.2 strain. Sensitive detection was associated with false positive results (p=0.03).
Overall, the data indicate that comparable results are produced under slightly different assay conditions.
PubMed ID
21071266 View in PubMed
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An analysis of reading and spelling abilities of children using AAC: Understanding a continuum of competence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140456
Source
Augment Altern Commun. 2010 Sep;26(3):191-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Annika Dahlgren Sandberg
Martine Smith
Maria Larsson
Author Affiliation
University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Augment Altern Commun. 2010 Sep;26(3):191-202
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Aptitude
Cerebral Palsy - rehabilitation
Child
Child, Preschool
Communication Aids for Disabled
Communication Disorders - rehabilitation
Comprehension
Education, Special
Female
Humans
Ireland
Language
Mainstreaming (Education)
Male
Memory, Short-Term
Phonetics
Reading
Retention (Psychology)
Sweden
Verbal Learning
Vocabulary
Abstract
The over-representation of reading and spelling difficulties in children with complex communication needs has been well documented. However, most of the studies reported have indicated that at least some children using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) can achieve and demonstrate effective literacy skills, highlighting the heterogeneity of this group. This paper presents findings from a cross-linguistic study of 14 Swedish and 14 Irish children with cerebral palsy who use AAC, outlining their performance on a range of phonological awareness, reading, and spelling tasks developed for the purposes of the study. All participants were referred to the study as functioning in the average range of intellectual ability. Of the 28 participants, eight were classified as good readers, on the basis of their success on tasks involving connected text; while 10 presented with single-word reading skills; and 10 were categorized as non-readers. This paper explores the similarities and differences within and across these groups, in terms of associated skills and experiences. While analyses of group data suggests some common abilities and difficulties, exploration of individual profiles highlights the heterogeneity of the participants' profiles, suggesting a need for detailed individual assessment and interventions.
PubMed ID
20874081 View in PubMed
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249 records – page 1 of 25.