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Postnatal developmental changes in CO2 sensitivity in rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81745
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2006 Oct;101(4):1097-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Davis S E
Solhied G.
Castillo M.
Dwinell M.
Brozoski D.
Forster H V
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, Medical College of Wisconsin and Zablocki Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Milwaukee, USA.
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2006 Oct;101(4):1097-103
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Animals, Outbred Strains
Carbon Dioxide - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Hypercapnia - chemically induced - physiopathology
Plethysmography, Whole Body
Pulmonary Ventilation - drug effects - physiology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Dahl
Rats, Inbred Strains - physiology
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Respiratory System - drug effects - growth & development
Species Specificity
Abstract
Ventilatory sensitivity to CO(2) in awake adult Brown Norway (BN) rats is 50-75% lower than in adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) and salt-sensitive Dahl S (SS) rats. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that this difference would be apparent during the development of CO(2) sensitivity. Four litters of each strain were divided into four groups such that rats were exposed to 7% inspired CO(2) for 5 min in a plethysmograph every third day from postnatal day (P) 0 to P21 and again on P29 and P30. From P0 to P14, CO(2) exposure increased pulmonary ventilation (Ve) by 25-50% in the BN and SD strains and between 25 to over 200% in the SS strain. In all strains beginning around P15, the response to CO(2) increased progressively reaching a peak at P19-21 when Ve during hypercapnia was 175-225% above eucapnia. There were minimal changes in CO(2) sensitivity between P21 and P30, and at both ages there were minimal between-strain differences. At P30, the response to CO(2) in the SS and SD strains was near the adult response, but the response in the BN rats was 100% greater at P30 than in adults. We conclude that 1) CO(2)-sensing mechanisms, and/or mechanisms downstream from the chemoreceptors, change dramatically at the age in rats when other physiological systems are also maturing ( approximately P15), and 2) there is a high degree of age-dependent plasticity in CO(2) sensitivity in rats, which differs between strains.
PubMed ID
16794027 View in PubMed
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Ventilatory phenotypes among four strains of adult rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49800
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2002 Sep;93(3):974-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Matthew R Hodges
Hubert V Forster
Paula E Papanek
Melinda R Dwinell
Genevieve E Hogan
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Wisconsin 53226, USA.
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2002 Sep;93(3):974-83
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anoxia - physiopathology
Female
Hypercapnia - physiopathology
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Phenotype
Rats
Rats, Inbred Strains - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Respiration
Respiratory physiology
Sex Characteristics
Species Specificity
Abstract
Our purpose in this study was to identify different ventilatory phenotypes among four different strains of rats. We examined 114 rats from three in-house, inbred strains and one outbred strain: Brown Norway (BN; n = 26), Dahl salt-sensitive (n = 24), Fawn-hooded Hypertensive (FHH: n = 27), and outbred Sprague-Dawley rats (SD; n = 37). We measured eupneic (room air) breathing and the ventilatory responses to hypoxia (12% O(2)-88% N(2)), hypercapnia (7% CO(2)), and two levels of submaximal exercise. Primary strain differences were between BN and the other strains. BN rats had a relatively attenuated ventilatory response to CO(2) (P 0.05), indicating that the metabolic rate during hypoxia decreased more in BN rats than in other strains. Another strain difference was in the frequency and timing components of augmented breaths, where FHH rats frequently differed from the other strains, and the BN rats had the longest expiratory time of the augmented breaths (probably secondary to the blunted CO(2) sensitivity). These strain differences not only provide insight into physiological mechanisms but also indicate traits (such as CO(2) sensitivity) that are genetically regulated. Finally, the data establish a foundation for physiological genomic studies aimed at elucidating the genetics of these ventilatory control mechanisms.
PubMed ID
12183493 View in PubMed
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