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A 5-year follow-up of signs and symptoms of TMD and radiographic findings in the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182090
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 2003 Nov-Dec;16(6):631-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kaija Hiltunen
Jaakko S Peltola
Miira M Vehkalahti
Timo Närhi
Anja Ainamo
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Finland. kaija.hiltunen@helsinki.fi
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 2003 Nov-Dec;16(6):631-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mandibular Condyle - physiopathology - radiography
Radiography, Panoramic
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Sex Factors
Temporomandibular Joint - physiopathology - radiography
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - classification - physiopathology - radiography
Abstract
The aim was to clarify the associations among subjective symptoms, clinical signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and radiographic findings in the mandibular condyles of elderly people during a 5-year follow-up.
As part of a comprehensive medical survey of a random sample born in 1904, 1909, and 1914 (Helsinki Aging Study), 364 subjects living in Helsinki participated in the dental part of the examination during 1990 and 1991; after 5 years, 103 of these were reexamined. Comprehensive data on TMD were available for 94 subjects, and radiographic data were available for 88. TMD were assessed by Helkimo's anamnestic and clinical indices, and radiographic status was assessed by panoramic radiographs.
During the 5-year follow-up, reported anamnestic symptoms of TMD for men changed little (9%); among women, the change from baseline was 42%. When the unchanged indices were compared, the gender difference was obvious. At baseline, 5% of the women, but no men, had severe signs (clinical index III) of TMD. At the end of follow-up, none showed severe signs. Comparison of radiographic findings between baseline and follow-up showed no differences, nor did differences appear in associations between radiographic findings and anamnestic or clinical indices.
During the 5-year follow-up, signs and symptoms of TMD in these elderly individuals became milder or vanished. The radiographic status of the condyles remained stable, and no association appeared between radiographic findings and signs and symptoms of TMD.
PubMed ID
14714843 View in PubMed
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10-year results of a new low-monomer cement: follow-up of a randomized RSA study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119286
Source
Acta Orthop. 2012 Dec;83(6):604-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Per Söderlund
Jon Dahl
Stephan Röhrl
Bo Nivbrant
Kjell G Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Institution of Surgery and Perioperative Sciences and Department of Orthopedics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. per.soderlund@orthop.umu.se
Source
Acta Orthop. 2012 Dec;83(6):604-8
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - methods
Bone Cements - chemistry - therapeutic use
Confidence Intervals
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Prosthesis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Risk assessment
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Time Factors
Titanium
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The properties and performance of a new low-monomer cement were examined in this prospective randomized, controlled RSA study. 5-year data have already been published, showing no statistically significant differences compared to controls. In the present paper we present the 10-year results.
44 patients were originally randomized to receive total hip replacement with a Lubinus SPII titanium-aluminum-vanadium stem cemented either with the new Cemex Rx bone cement or with control bone cement, Palacos R. Patients were examined using RSA, Harris hip score, and conventional radiographs.
At 10 years, 33 hips could be evaluated clinically and 30 hips could be evaluated with RSA (16 Cemex and 14 Palacos). 9 patients had died and 4 patients were too old or infirm to be investigated. Except for 1 hip that was revised for infection after less than 5 years, no further hips were revised before the 10-year follow-up. There were no statistically significant clinical differences between the groups. The Cemex cement had magnitudes of migration similar to or sometimes lower than those of Palacos cement. In both groups, most hips showed extensive radiolucent lines, probably due to the use of titanium alloy stems.
At 10 years, the Cemex bone cement tested performed just as well as the control (Palacos bone cement).
Notes
Cites: Acta Orthop Scand. 2001 Dec;72(6):572-8411817871
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2004 Sep;86(7):974-815446521
Cites: Acta Orthop Scand Suppl. 1986;221:1-403468743
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1988 May 21;296(6634):1454-63132290
Cites: J Biomed Mater Res. 1993 May;27(5):565-748314809
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2000 Aug;15(5):570-510959994
Cites: Acta Orthop Scand. 1994 Feb;65(1):20-38154277
Cites: J Appl Biomater. 1995 Spring;6(1):75-837703541
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1996 Mar;78(3):325-308613438
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1996 Sep;78(5):802-88836075
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2008 Dec;79(6):826-3119085502
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1993 Oct;(295):239-458403655
PubMed ID
23116438 View in PubMed
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Alternative outcome measures in young total hip arthroplasty patients: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269304
Source
Hip Int. 2015 Mar-Apr;25(2):152-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jakob Klit
Steffen Jacobsen
Victoria Schmiegelow
Stig Sonne-Holm
Anders Troelsen
Source
Hip Int. 2015 Mar-Apr;25(2):152-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - methods
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Prosthesis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Hip - radiography - surgery
Pain Measurement
Prospective Studies
Prosthesis Failure
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Recovery of Function
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In this prospective multicentre cohort study we studied subjects younger than 60 years of age scheduled for primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). The study assessed patients' overall satisfaction, fulfillment of preoperative expectations, the effect on socioeconomic parameters, and quality of sex-life. Questionnaires including Oxford Hip Score (OHS) and SF-36 were evaluated preoperatively and 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. OHS and SF-36 showed significant improvements (p
PubMed ID
25655738 View in PubMed
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Analysis of effectiveness of therapeutic exercise for knee osteoarthritis and possible factors affecting outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106930
Source
J Orthop Sci. 2013 Nov;18(6):932-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Miki Kudo
Kota Watanabe
Hidenori Otsubo
Tomoaki Kamiya
Fuminari Kaneko
Masaki Katayose
Toshihiko Yamashita
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1, West-16, Chuo-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8543, Japan, miky_ku@yahoo.co.jp.
Source
J Orthop Sci. 2013 Nov;18(6):932-9
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Community Health Services
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Home Care Services
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario
Osteoarthritis, Knee - diagnosis - rehabilitation
Pain Measurement
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There are numerous reports and evidences to suggest that exercise therapy is effective for knee osteoarthritis (knee OA). However, there is a lack of sufficient research concerning the factors influencing its application and effectiveness. The purposes of this study were to evaluate effects of the mode of treatment delivery on the improvement of symptoms in knee OA, and to analyze potential risk factors affecting improvement after exercise therapies.
The 209 women applicants diagnosed with knee OA were randomly allocated into either a group performing group exercise in a class or a group performing home exercise. The 90 min exercise program was performed under the guidance of physiotherapists as a group exercise therapy. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) of the subjects of both groups before and after intervention was compared to examine the effect of exercise therapy. In addition, body mass index, knee range of motion (ROM), the femorotibial angle from radiographs, OA severity from Kellgren-Lawrence grade, and meniscus abnormality and subchondral bone marrow lesions from MRI findings were statistically analyzed as factors that may affect exercise therapy.
A significantly greater improvement in WOMAC was observed in the subjects of group exercise (81 subjects) as compared with the subjects of home exercise (122 subjects). There was a significantly high proportion of subjects with knee flexion contracture among the subjects participating in group exercise that showed only minor symptom improvement (p 
PubMed ID
24085378 View in PubMed
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Are perceived muscle tension, electromyographic hyperactivity and personality traits correlated in the fibromyalgia syndrome?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190165
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2002 Mar;34(2):73-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Sally Aspegren Kendall
Jessica Elert
Lisa Ekselius
Björn Gerdle
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping, Sweden. sally.a.kendall@inr.liu.se
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2002 Mar;34(2):73-9
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Electromyography
Female
Fibromyalgia - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Pain Measurement
Personality
Personality Assessment
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Risk assessment
Sampling Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Shoulder Joint
Sweden
Syndrome
Abstract
The study was performed to investigate the relationship between perceived muscle tension and electromyographic hyperactivity and to what extent electromyographic (EMG) hyperactivity relates to personality traits in fibromyalgics. Thirty-six females with fibromyalgia performed isokinetic maximal forward flexions of the shoulder combined with surface EMG recordings of the trapezius and infraspinatus muscles. Signal amplitude ratio and peak torque were calculated in the initial and endurance test phases. Pain intensity, perceived general and local shoulder muscle tension, and personality traits using the Karolinska Scales of Personality were assessed pre-test. Neither perceived muscle tension nor muscular tension personality trait correlated with EMG muscle hyperactivity. Perceived general muscle tension correlated with aspects of anxiety proneness (including muscle tension) of the Karolinska Scales of Personality. Pain intensity interacted with many of the variables. We propose that when patients with fibromyalgia report muscle tension that they may be expressing something other than physiological muscle tension.
PubMed ID
12019583 View in PubMed
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Arthroscopic acetabular labral debridement in patients forty-five years of age or older has minimal benefit for pain and function.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105280
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2014 Jan 15;96(2):113-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-2014
Author
Geoffrey Wilkin
Gerard March
Paul E Beaulé
Author Affiliation
Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, The Ottawa Hospital, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON K1H 8L6, Canada. E-mail address for P.E. Beaulé: pbeaule@ottawahospital.on.ca.
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2014 Jan 15;96(2):113-8
Date
Jan-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetabulum - surgery
Age Factors
Aged
Arthroscopy - adverse effects - methods
Cartilage, Articular - physiopathology - surgery
Cohort Studies
Debridement - adverse effects - methods
Female
Hip Joint - physiopathology - surgery
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pain Measurement
Postoperative Complications - physiopathology - surgery
Prognosis
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Recovery of Function
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Abstract
Hip arthroscopy is being performed with expanding indications, commonly including symptomatic labral tears. The effects of various patient factors, including patient age, on clinical outcomes are not well understood. The purpose of the present study was to quantify the postoperative functional and quality-of-life outcomes after arthroscopic debridement of symptomatic labral tears in patients forty-five years of age or older.
Forty-one patients who were at least forty-five years of age (mean age, 52.7 years [range, 45.5 to 67.0 years]; mean body mass index, 26.1 kg/m² [range, 18.4 to 33.2 kg/m²]; 75.6% female) and who underwent labral debridement at the time of hip arthroscopy were included. Disease-specific clinical outcome measures (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index [WOMAC] and modified Harris hip score [mHHS]) and general health-related measures (12-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF-12]) were collected preoperatively and postoperatively.
The reoperation rate was 17% (seven of forty-one) at a mean of 21.3 months, and six of the seven reoperations involved conversion to hip arthroplasty or resurfacing. The overall hip arthroscopy cohort had postoperative improvements in the mean WOMAC pain score (from 54.0 [range, 20 to 90] to 69.4 [range, 0 to 100], p
Notes
Comment In: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2014 Jan 15;96(2):e1624430425
PubMed ID
24430410 View in PubMed
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Association between changes in global femoral offset after total hip arthroplasty and function, quality of life, and abductor muscle strength. A prospective cohort study of 222 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272483
Source
Acta Orthop. 2016 Feb;87(1):36-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Sarwar S Mahmood
Sebastian S Mukka
Sead Crnalic
Per Wretenberg
Arkan S Sayed-Noor
Source
Acta Orthop. 2016 Feb;87(1):36-41
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - methods - psychology
Cohort Studies
Female
Femur - physiopathology - radiography
Femur Head - physiopathology - radiography
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Joint - physiopathology - radiography
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Strength - physiology
Osteoarthritis, Hip - pathology - radiography - surgery
Postoperative Complications - physiopathology - radiography
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Recovery of Function
Risk assessment
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There is no consensus on the association between global femoral offset (FO) and outcome after total hip arthroplasty (THA). We assessed the association between FO and patients' reported hip function, quality of life, and abductor muscle strength.
We included 250 patients with unilateral hip osteoarthritis who underwent a THA. Before the operation, the patient's reported hip function was evaluated with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) index and quality of life was evaluated with EQ-5D. At 1-year follow-up, the same scores and also hip abductor muscle strength were measured. 222 patients were available for follow-up. These patients were divided into 3 groups according to the postoperative global FO of the operated hip compared to the contralateral hip, as measured on plain radiographs: the decreased FO group (more than 5 mm reduction), the restored FO group (within 5 mm restoration), and the increased FO group (more than 5 mm increment).
All 3 groups improved (p?
PubMed ID
26471772 View in PubMed
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Association Between Distal Radial Fracture Malunion and Patient-Reported Activity Limitations: A Long-Term Follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301170
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2018 Apr 18; 100(8):633-639
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-18-2018
Author
Muhanned Ali
Elisabeth Brogren
Philippe Wagner
Isam Atroshi
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, Kristianstad and Hässleholm Hospitals, Hässleholm, Sweden.
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2018 Apr 18; 100(8):633-639
Date
Apr-18-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Casts, Surgical
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fracture Fixation - methods
Fracture Healing - physiology
Fractures, Malunited - physiopathology - surgery
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Long-Term Care
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Pain, Postoperative - etiology - physiopathology
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Patient satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Radius Fractures - physiopathology - surgery
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Sweden
Wrist Joint - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The long-term effect of distal radial fracture malunion on activity limitations is unknown. Between 2001 and 2002, we conducted a prospective cohort study of all patients with distal radial fracture treated with casting or percutaneous fixation in northeast Scania in Sweden. In that original study, the patients completed the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire at baseline and at 2 years. We performed a long-term follow-up study of patients who were 18 to 65 years of age at the time of the fracture to investigate the association between fracture malunion and activity limitations.
In this long-term follow-up, patients who had participated in the original study completed the DASH questionnaire and a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and for satisfaction (scored, 0 [best] to 100) and underwent radiographic and physical examinations at 12 to 14 years after the fracture. We defined malunion as dorsal angulation of =10°, ulnar variance of =3 mm, and/or radial inclination of =15°. We also assessed the presence of radiocarpal osteoarthritis and ulnar styloid nonunion. The primary outcome was the change in DASH score from baseline. Secondary outcomes were DASH, pain, and satisfaction scores, wrist range of motion, and grip strength at the time of the follow-up.
Of 85 eligible patients, 63 (74%) responded to the questionnaires and underwent examinations. Malunion was found in 25 patients, osteoarthritis was found in 38 patients, and styloid nonunion was found in 9 patients. Compared with patients without malunion, those with malunion had significantly worse DASH scores from baseline to 12 to 14 years (p = 0.002); the adjusted mean difference was 11 points (95% confidence interval [CI], 4 to 17 points). Similarly, follow-up scores were significantly worse among patients with malunion; the adjusted mean difference was 14 points (95% CI, 7 to 22 points; p 0.05) with DASH scores, VAS pain or satisfaction scores, or grip strength.
Patients who sustain a distal radial fracture at the age of 18 to 65 years and develop malunion are more likely to have worse long-term outcomes including activity limitations and pain.
Prognostic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
Notes
CommentIn: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2018 Apr 18;100(8):e52 PMID 29664861
PubMed ID
29664849 View in PubMed
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Association between the side of unilateral shoulder pain and preferred sleeping position: a cross-sectional study of 83 Danish patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124244
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2012 Jun;35(5):407-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Bo Kempf
Alice Kongsted
Author Affiliation
Chiropractor, Chiropractic Clinic, Kerteminde, Denmark.
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2012 Jun;35(5):407-12
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Beds
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Posture
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Shoulder Pain - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Sleep
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate if there is an association between the side of unilateral shoulder pain and the patient's preferred sleeping position and if the preferred sleeping position is related to which side of a double bed one lies in.
In a cross-sectional study, adult patients seeking chiropractic care with unilateral shoulder pain were asked about sleeping position and, if sleeping with a partner, which side of the bed they slept in. A total of 83 participants were included from 10 chiropractic clinics. Associations were cross-tabulated and tested by Fisher exact test.
The pain was in the right shoulder in 55% (95 % confidence interval, 46-66) of the participants with unilateral pain. The side of shoulder pain was associated to the side patients slept on, with 67% of those sleeping on one side lying on the painful shoulder (P = .02). Moreover, patients were more likely to turn away from their partner at night, and 76% slept on the side opposite their partner (P
PubMed ID
22608285 View in PubMed
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Association of neck pain, disability and neck pain during maximal effort with neck muscle strength and range of movement in women with chronic non-specific neck pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178716
Source
Eur J Pain. 2004 Oct;8(5):473-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Jari Ylinen
Esa-Pekka Takala
Hannu Kautiainen
Matti Nykänen
Arja Häkkinen
Timo Pohjolainen
Sirkka-Liisa Karppi
Olavi Airaksinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Jyväskylä Central Hospital, Keskussairaalantie 19, 40620 Jyväskylä, Finland. jari.ylinen@ksshp.fi
Source
Eur J Pain. 2004 Oct;8(5):473-8
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cervical Vertebrae - physiology
Chronic Disease
Disability Evaluation
Female
Finland
Head Movements - physiology
Humans
Isometric Contraction - physiology
Middle Aged
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Muscle Weakness - etiology - physiopathology
Neck Muscles - physiopathology
Neck Pain - etiology - physiopathology
Occupational Diseases
Pain Threshold - physiology
Questionnaires
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Stress, mechanical
Torque
Weight-Bearing
Abstract
Several studies have reported lower neck muscle strength in patients with chronic neck pain compared to healthy controls. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between the severity of neck pain and disability with neck strength and range of movement in women suffering from chronic neck pain. One hundred and seventy-nine female office workers with chronic neck pain were selected to the study. The outcome was assessed by the self-rating questionnaires on neck pain (visual analogue scale, Vernon's disability index, Neck pain and disability index) and by measures of the passive range of movement (ROM) and maximal isometric neck muscle strength. No statistically significant correlation was found between perceived neck pain and the disability indices and the maximal isometric neck strength and ROM measures. However, the pain values reported during the strength tests were inversely correlated with the results of strength tests (r=-0.24 to -0.46), showing that pain was associated with decreased force production. About two-thirds of the patients felt pain during test efforts. Pain may prevent full effort during strength tests and hence the production of maximal force. Thus in patients with chronic neck pain the results do not always describe true maximal strength, but rather the patients' ability to bear strain, which may be considerably influenced by their painful condition. The results of the present study suggest that rehabilitation in cases of chronic neck pain should aim at raising tolerance to mechanical strain.
PubMed ID
15324778 View in PubMed
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98 records – page 1 of 10.