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266 records – page 1 of 27.

A 5-year follow-up of signs and symptoms of TMD and radiographic findings in the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182090
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 2003 Nov-Dec;16(6):631-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kaija Hiltunen
Jaakko S Peltola
Miira M Vehkalahti
Timo Närhi
Anja Ainamo
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Finland. kaija.hiltunen@helsinki.fi
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 2003 Nov-Dec;16(6):631-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mandibular Condyle - physiopathology - radiography
Radiography, Panoramic
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Sex Factors
Temporomandibular Joint - physiopathology - radiography
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - classification - physiopathology - radiography
Abstract
The aim was to clarify the associations among subjective symptoms, clinical signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and radiographic findings in the mandibular condyles of elderly people during a 5-year follow-up.
As part of a comprehensive medical survey of a random sample born in 1904, 1909, and 1914 (Helsinki Aging Study), 364 subjects living in Helsinki participated in the dental part of the examination during 1990 and 1991; after 5 years, 103 of these were reexamined. Comprehensive data on TMD were available for 94 subjects, and radiographic data were available for 88. TMD were assessed by Helkimo's anamnestic and clinical indices, and radiographic status was assessed by panoramic radiographs.
During the 5-year follow-up, reported anamnestic symptoms of TMD for men changed little (9%); among women, the change from baseline was 42%. When the unchanged indices were compared, the gender difference was obvious. At baseline, 5% of the women, but no men, had severe signs (clinical index III) of TMD. At the end of follow-up, none showed severe signs. Comparison of radiographic findings between baseline and follow-up showed no differences, nor did differences appear in associations between radiographic findings and anamnestic or clinical indices.
During the 5-year follow-up, signs and symptoms of TMD in these elderly individuals became milder or vanished. The radiographic status of the condyles remained stable, and no association appeared between radiographic findings and signs and symptoms of TMD.
PubMed ID
14714843 View in PubMed
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10-year results of a new low-monomer cement: follow-up of a randomized RSA study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119286
Source
Acta Orthop. 2012 Dec;83(6):604-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Per Söderlund
Jon Dahl
Stephan Röhrl
Bo Nivbrant
Kjell G Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Institution of Surgery and Perioperative Sciences and Department of Orthopedics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. per.soderlund@orthop.umu.se
Source
Acta Orthop. 2012 Dec;83(6):604-8
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - methods
Bone Cements - chemistry - therapeutic use
Confidence Intervals
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Prosthesis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Risk assessment
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Time Factors
Titanium
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The properties and performance of a new low-monomer cement were examined in this prospective randomized, controlled RSA study. 5-year data have already been published, showing no statistically significant differences compared to controls. In the present paper we present the 10-year results.
44 patients were originally randomized to receive total hip replacement with a Lubinus SPII titanium-aluminum-vanadium stem cemented either with the new Cemex Rx bone cement or with control bone cement, Palacos R. Patients were examined using RSA, Harris hip score, and conventional radiographs.
At 10 years, 33 hips could be evaluated clinically and 30 hips could be evaluated with RSA (16 Cemex and 14 Palacos). 9 patients had died and 4 patients were too old or infirm to be investigated. Except for 1 hip that was revised for infection after less than 5 years, no further hips were revised before the 10-year follow-up. There were no statistically significant clinical differences between the groups. The Cemex cement had magnitudes of migration similar to or sometimes lower than those of Palacos cement. In both groups, most hips showed extensive radiolucent lines, probably due to the use of titanium alloy stems.
At 10 years, the Cemex bone cement tested performed just as well as the control (Palacos bone cement).
Notes
Cites: Acta Orthop Scand. 2001 Dec;72(6):572-8411817871
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2004 Sep;86(7):974-815446521
Cites: Acta Orthop Scand Suppl. 1986;221:1-403468743
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Cites: J Biomed Mater Res. 1993 May;27(5):565-748314809
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2000 Aug;15(5):570-510959994
Cites: Acta Orthop Scand. 1994 Feb;65(1):20-38154277
Cites: J Appl Biomater. 1995 Spring;6(1):75-837703541
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1996 Mar;78(3):325-308613438
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1996 Sep;78(5):802-88836075
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2008 Dec;79(6):826-3119085502
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1993 Oct;(295):239-458403655
PubMed ID
23116438 View in PubMed
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A 12-year comparison of common therapeutic interventions in the burn unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153001
Source
J Burn Care Res. 2009 Mar-Apr;30(2):281-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Christopher Whitehead
Michael Serghiou
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation Services, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Galveston, Texas, USA.
Source
J Burn Care Res. 2009 Mar-Apr;30(2):281-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Burn Units - statistics & numerical data
Burns - rehabilitation
Canada
Disability Evaluation
Humans
Physical Therapy Modalities
Posture
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Range of Motion, Articular
Skin Transplantation
Splints
United States
Abstract
Although most occupational and physical therapists in an acute burn care setting use similar therapy practices, the time frames at which these therapeutic interventions are carried out vary according to the burn centers' practices. The purpose of this survey was to investigate current trends in burn rehabilitation and compare the results with a similar survey performed in 1994. The survey was designed in a similar fashion to the 1994 survey to ascertain common trends in burn rehabilitation. The survey was sent to 100 randomly selected burn care facilities throughout the United States and Canada. Content included rehabilitation interventions, including evaluation, positioning, splinting, active range of motion, passive range of motion, ambulation, as well as the cross-training of therapists. Significant increases in the percentages of burn centers initiating common therapy practices were found. Positioning (41% increase), active range of motion (48% increase), passive range of motion (52% increase), and ambulation (29% increase) were all found to have increases in the number of burn centers employing these practices in the same time frame. Overall comparison from 1994 to 2006 shows that common therapy techniques are being initiated earlier in the patient's acute burn stay. These results are consistent with recent medical trends of earlier acute discharges and more focus on outpatient rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
19165113 View in PubMed
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The ability to reproduce the neutral zero position of the head.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50943
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1999 Jan;22(1):26-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
H W Christensen
N. Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Nordic Institute of Chiropractic & Clinical Biomechanics, Odense, Denmark.
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1999 Jan;22(1):26-8
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cervical Vertebrae - physiology
Chiropractic - instrumentation
Female
Head
Humans
Male
Posture - physiology
Range of Motion, Articular
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rotation
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine how precisely asymptomatic subjects can reproduce a neutral zero position of the head. STUDY DESIGN: Repeated measures of the active cervical neutral zero position. SETTING: Institute of Medical Biology (Center of Biomechanics) at Odense University. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-eight asymptomatic students from the University of Odense, male/female ratio 20:18 and mean age 24.3 years (range, 20 to 30 years). INTERVENTION: Measurements of the location of the neutral zero head position by use of the electrogoniometer CA-6000 Spine Motion Analyzer. Each subject's neutral zero position with eyes closed was measured 3 times. The device gives the localization of the neutral zero as coordinates in 3 dimensions (x, v, z) corresponding to the 3 motion planes. RESULTS: The mean difference from neutral zero in 3 motion planes was found to be 2.7 degrees in the sagittal plane, 1.0 degree in the horizontal plane, and 0.65 degree in the frontal plane. CONCLUSION: We found that young adult asymptomatic subjects are very good at reproducing the neutral zero position of the head. This suggests the existence of some advanced neurologic control mechanisms.
PubMed ID
10029946 View in PubMed
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Alternative outcome measures in young total hip arthroplasty patients: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269304
Source
Hip Int. 2015 Mar-Apr;25(2):152-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jakob Klit
Steffen Jacobsen
Victoria Schmiegelow
Stig Sonne-Holm
Anders Troelsen
Source
Hip Int. 2015 Mar-Apr;25(2):152-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - methods
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Prosthesis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Hip - radiography - surgery
Pain Measurement
Prospective Studies
Prosthesis Failure
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Recovery of Function
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In this prospective multicentre cohort study we studied subjects younger than 60 years of age scheduled for primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). The study assessed patients' overall satisfaction, fulfillment of preoperative expectations, the effect on socioeconomic parameters, and quality of sex-life. Questionnaires including Oxford Hip Score (OHS) and SF-36 were evaluated preoperatively and 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. OHS and SF-36 showed significant improvements (p
PubMed ID
25655738 View in PubMed
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Analysis of effectiveness of therapeutic exercise for knee osteoarthritis and possible factors affecting outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106930
Source
J Orthop Sci. 2013 Nov;18(6):932-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Miki Kudo
Kota Watanabe
Hidenori Otsubo
Tomoaki Kamiya
Fuminari Kaneko
Masaki Katayose
Toshihiko Yamashita
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1, West-16, Chuo-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8543, Japan, miky_ku@yahoo.co.jp.
Source
J Orthop Sci. 2013 Nov;18(6):932-9
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Community Health Services
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Home Care Services
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario
Osteoarthritis, Knee - diagnosis - rehabilitation
Pain Measurement
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There are numerous reports and evidences to suggest that exercise therapy is effective for knee osteoarthritis (knee OA). However, there is a lack of sufficient research concerning the factors influencing its application and effectiveness. The purposes of this study were to evaluate effects of the mode of treatment delivery on the improvement of symptoms in knee OA, and to analyze potential risk factors affecting improvement after exercise therapies.
The 209 women applicants diagnosed with knee OA were randomly allocated into either a group performing group exercise in a class or a group performing home exercise. The 90 min exercise program was performed under the guidance of physiotherapists as a group exercise therapy. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) of the subjects of both groups before and after intervention was compared to examine the effect of exercise therapy. In addition, body mass index, knee range of motion (ROM), the femorotibial angle from radiographs, OA severity from Kellgren-Lawrence grade, and meniscus abnormality and subchondral bone marrow lesions from MRI findings were statistically analyzed as factors that may affect exercise therapy.
A significantly greater improvement in WOMAC was observed in the subjects of group exercise (81 subjects) as compared with the subjects of home exercise (122 subjects). There was a significantly high proportion of subjects with knee flexion contracture among the subjects participating in group exercise that showed only minor symptom improvement (p 
PubMed ID
24085378 View in PubMed
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Ankle-foot orthoses in children with cerebral palsy: a cross sectional population based study of 2200 children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262679
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2014;15:327
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Maria Wingstrand
Gunnar Hägglund
Elisabet Rodby-Bousquet
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2014;15:327
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Ankle
Cerebral Palsy - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Foot Orthoses - utilization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Population Surveillance - methods
Range of Motion, Articular
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) is the most frequently used type of orthosis in children with cerebral palsy (CP). AFOs are designed either to improve function or to prevent or treat muscle contractures. The purpose of the present study was to analyse the use of, the indications for, and the outcome of using AFO, relative to age and gross motor function in a total population of children with cerebral palsy.
A cross-sectional study was performed of 2200 children (58% boys, 42% girls), 0-19 years old (median age 7?years), based on data from the national Swedish follow-up programme and registry for CP. To analyse the outcome of passive ankle dorsiflexion, data was compared between 2011 and 2012. The Gross motor classification system (GMFCS) levels of included children was as follows: I (n?=?879), II (n?=?357), III (n?=?230), IV (n?=?374) and V (n?=?355).
AFOs were used by 1127 (51%) of the children. In 215 children (10%), the indication was to improve function, in 251 (11%) to maintain or increase range of motion, and 661 of the children (30%) used AFOs for both purposes. The use of AFOs was highest in 5-year-olds (67%) and was more frequent at lower levels of motor function with 70% at GMFCS IV-V. Physiotherapists reported achievement of functional goals in 73% of the children using AFOs and maintenance or improvement in range of ankle dorsiflexion in 70%.
AFOs were used by half of the children with CP in Sweden. The treatment goals were attained in almost three quarters of the children, equally at all GMFCS levels. AFOs to improve range of motion were more effective in children with a more significant decrease in dorsiflexion at baseline.
Notes
Cites: Phys Ther. 1987 Feb;67(2):206-73809245
Cites: Child Care Health Dev. 2002 Mar;28(2):139-4711952649
Cites: Dev Med Child Neurol. 1997 Feb;39(2):106-129062425
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2005 Jan;87(1):95-10115686244
Cites: J Pediatr Orthop B. 2005 Jul;14(4):269-7315931031
Cites: Neural Plast. 2005;12(2-3):221-8; discussion 263-7216097490
Cites: Pediatrics. 2008 Jan;121(1):e187-9218070932
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2008 Jul;40(7):529-3418758669
Cites: Dev Med Child Neurol. 2008 Oct;50(10):744-5018834387
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Cites: BMC Med. 2009;7:6519863779
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Cites: Dev Med Child Neurol. 2013 Oct;55(10):885-91023962350
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2012 May;470(5):1286-9321445713
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Cites: Dev Med Child Neurol. 2002 Sep;44(9):633-4012227618
Cites: NeuroRehabilitation. 2011;28(1):37-4621335676
Cites: Dev Med Child Neurol. 2000 Dec;42(12):816-2411132255
Cites: Radiographics. 2002 Mar-Apr;22(2):257-6811896216
Cites: Dev Med Child Neurol. 2004 Jan;46(1):34-814974645
Cites: Dev Med Child Neurol. 1988 Feb;30(1):3-103371569
PubMed ID
25274143 View in PubMed
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Are components of a comprehensive medical assessment predictive of work disability after an episode of occupational low back trouble?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187542
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2002 Dec 1;27(23):2715-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2002
Author
David G Hunt
Oonagh A Zuberbier
Allan J Kozlowski
Jonathan Berkowitz
Izabela Z Schultz
Ruth A Milner
Joan M Crook
Dennis C Turk
Author Affiliation
Workers Compensation Board of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2002 Dec 1;27(23):2715-9
Date
Dec-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Back Injuries - complications - diagnosis - rehabilitation
British Columbia
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - classification
Humans
Logistic Models
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - etiology - rehabilitation
Lumbosacral Region
Medical History Taking
Occupational Diseases - complications - diagnosis - rehabilitation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physical Examination
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Range of Motion, Articular
Rehabilitation, Vocational
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
One hundred fifty-nine subacute low back work-injured patients completed a full medical assessment at baseline. A full repeat examination was performed 3 months later, when return-to-work status was determined.
To determine the prognostic value of a comprehensive medical assessment for the prediction of return-to-work status.
A systematic review of the work disability prediction literature of low back trouble prognosis revealed that no high-quality studies included a full medical history and physical examination in the design. The results of studies included in the systematic review were equivocal with respect to predictive usefulness of medical variables.
Participants completed medical history questionnaires and then were clinically examined by one of six experienced examiners (three physicians and three physiotherapists). Return-to-work status was measured 3 months later, and predictive validity was evaluated using logistic regression modeling.
Medical variables (, medical history subscales, physical examination subscales, and lumbar range-of-motion tests) showed modest correct classification rates varying between 61.6% and 69.1% for participants.
Comprehensive medical assessments play a crucial role in the early identification of serious pathology after low back trouble. We were unable to identify, however, any medical evaluation variables that would account for significant proportions of variance in return to work. The weight of evidence obtained in this study suggests that injured workers' subjective interpretations and appraisals may be more powerful predictors of the course of postinjury recovery than exclusively medical assessments.
PubMed ID
12461398 View in PubMed
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Are perceived muscle tension, electromyographic hyperactivity and personality traits correlated in the fibromyalgia syndrome?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190165
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2002 Mar;34(2):73-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Sally Aspegren Kendall
Jessica Elert
Lisa Ekselius
Björn Gerdle
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping, Sweden. sally.a.kendall@inr.liu.se
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2002 Mar;34(2):73-9
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Electromyography
Female
Fibromyalgia - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Pain Measurement
Personality
Personality Assessment
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Risk assessment
Sampling Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Shoulder Joint
Sweden
Syndrome
Abstract
The study was performed to investigate the relationship between perceived muscle tension and electromyographic hyperactivity and to what extent electromyographic (EMG) hyperactivity relates to personality traits in fibromyalgics. Thirty-six females with fibromyalgia performed isokinetic maximal forward flexions of the shoulder combined with surface EMG recordings of the trapezius and infraspinatus muscles. Signal amplitude ratio and peak torque were calculated in the initial and endurance test phases. Pain intensity, perceived general and local shoulder muscle tension, and personality traits using the Karolinska Scales of Personality were assessed pre-test. Neither perceived muscle tension nor muscular tension personality trait correlated with EMG muscle hyperactivity. Perceived general muscle tension correlated with aspects of anxiety proneness (including muscle tension) of the Karolinska Scales of Personality. Pain intensity interacted with many of the variables. We propose that when patients with fibromyalgia report muscle tension that they may be expressing something other than physiological muscle tension.
PubMed ID
12019583 View in PubMed
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Arm morbidity and disability after breast cancer: new directions for care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159371
Source
Oncol Nurs Forum. 2008 Jan;35(1):65-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Roanne L Thomas-Maclean
Thomas Hack
Winkle Kwan
Anna Towers
Baukje Miedema
Andrea Tilley
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. roanne.thomas@usask.ca
Source
Oncol Nurs Forum. 2008 Jan;35(1):65-71
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arm
Breast Neoplasms - surgery
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Lymph Node Excision - adverse effects
Lymphedema - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Pain - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Quality of Life
Range of Motion, Articular
Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy - adverse effects
Abstract
To chart the incidence and course of three types of arm morbidity (lymphedema, pain, and range of motion [ROM] restrictions) in women with breast cancer 6-12 months after surgery and the relationship between arm morbidity and disability.
Longitudinal mixed methods approach.
Four sites across Canada.
347 patients with breast cancer 6-12 months after surgery at first point of data collection.
Incidence rates were calculated for three types of arm morbidity, correlations between arm morbidity and disability were computed, and open-ended survey responses were compiled and reviewed.
Lymphedema, pain, ROM, and arm, shoulder, and hand disabilities.
Almost 12% of participants experienced lymphedema, 39% reported pain, and about 50% had ROM restrictions. Little overlap in the three types of arm morbidity was observed. Pain and ROM restrictions correlated significantly with disability, but most women did not discuss arm morbidity with healthcare professionals.
Pain and ROM restrictions are prevalent 6-12 months after surgery, but lymphedema is not. Pain and ROM restrictions are associated with disability.
Screening for pain and ROM restrictions should be part of breast cancer follow-up care. Left untreated, arm morbidity could have a long-term effect on quality of life. Additional research into the longevity of various arm morbidity symptoms and possible interrelationships also is required.
PubMed ID
18192154 View in PubMed
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266 records – page 1 of 27.