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20 records – page 1 of 2.

[An overview of hypertension studies with calcium antagonists]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47980
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 May 20;119(13):1878-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1999
Author
S E Kjeldsen
K. Midtbø
I. Os
A. Westheim
Author Affiliation
Hjerte- og nyremedisinske avdelinger, Medisinsk Klinikk, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 May 20;119(13):1878-82
Date
May-20-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Controlled Clinical Trials
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
English Abstract
Europe
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Multicenter Studies
Prospective Studies
Randomized Controlled Trials
Abstract
Calcium antagonists are widely used in the treatment of hypertension. However, few endpoint studies with calcium antagonists have been done to prove reduction in hypertensive complications. Results of the STONE, SYST-EUR and SYST-CHINA studies show that long-acting calcium antagonists are effective compared to placebo, especially in patients with isolated systolic hypertension and diabetes. Ongoing prospective and randomized trials like STOP II, INSIGHT, NORDIL, ALLHAT and ASCOT will clarify whether calcium antagonists are more effective than well-proven diuretics and betablockers. ASCOT will test the hypothesis that amlodipine is more efficacious than atenolol in preventing cardiac complications in 18,000 hypertensive patients with high coronary risk including diabetes (among them, 2,000 in Norway). The study is also randomizing the patients in a factorial design to either atorvastatin or placebo, testing the so-called lipid hypothesis.
PubMed ID
10382332 View in PubMed
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[Antiviral therapy of HIV infection in adults]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7408
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Nov 30;121(29):3414-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-30-2001
Author
V. Ormaasen
J N Bruun
Author Affiliation
Infeksjonsmedisinsk avdeling Medisinsk divisjon Ullevål sykehus 0407 Oslo. vidar.ormaasen@ioks.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Nov 30;121(29):3414-20
Date
Nov-30-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-HIV Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active - adverse effects - methods
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Drug Interactions
Drug Resistance, Viral
English Abstract
HIV Infections - drug therapy - immunology
HIV Seropositivity - drug therapy - immunology
Humans
Protease Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects
RNA, Viral - analysis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Great progress has been made in antiviral treatment of HIV disease over the last few years. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The paper is based on relevant literature and our own experience in the largest HIV clinic in Norway. RESULTS AND INTERPRETATION: Generally speaking, therapy with at least three active drugs is necessary in order to obtain maximum viral suppression. It is not established what constitutes the best starting-point for therapy, or what combination of drugs is the most efficacious. Treatment should be initiated before clinical immunodeficiency develops. All patients with CD4 counts
PubMed ID
11826789 View in PubMed
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[Can radiotherapy reduce the frequency of restenosis after coronary angioplasty?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54103
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Feb 28;120(6):707-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-2000
Author
C W Langberg
S. Solheim
S. Hagen
Author Affiliation
Onkologisk avdeling, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Feb 28;120(6):707-10
Date
Feb-28-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Animals
Beta Rays - therapeutic use
Coronary Disease - radiotherapy - therapy
Coronary Vessels - radiation effects
English Abstract
Gamma Rays - therapeutic use
Lasers - therapeutic use
Radiotherapy Dosage
Randomized Controlled Trials
Recurrence
Stents
Abstract
Today, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) is the most important treatment modality for coronary artery disease. However, restenosis occurs in 20-40% of the vessels in spite of the use of stents. Intravascular radiation therapy has reduced the frequency of restenosis in both animal studies and clinical trials. Recent randomized trials have shown a reduction in the order of 30% after irradiation. A number of techniques which use different sources of radiation (beta vs. gamma radiation) are under investigation. This review gives and update of intravascular radiation therapy, including a discussion of ongoing trials. There is a great need, also in Norway, for treatment modalities that reduce the frequency of restenosis after PTCA. It would seem imperative that we start a discussion of whether and when intravascular radiation therapy should be available in Norway. Implementation requires planning on a national level with regard to investment in equipment and training.
PubMed ID
10806885 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Aug 30;120(20):2430-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-2000
Author
T J Berg
Author Affiliation
Aker Diabetes Forskningssenter Aker sykehus 0514 Oslo. t.j.berg@ioks.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Aug 30;120(20):2430-3
Date
Aug-30-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology - genetics - metabolism - prevention & control
English Abstract
Humans
Intervention Studies
Life Style
Obesity - complications
Primary Prevention
Prospective Studies
Randomized Controlled Trials
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes among Norwegian men increased from 2.6% to 3.3% from 1986 to 1997. The most important environmental risk factors for type 2 diabetes are obesity and reduced physical activity. Genetic factors are also strongly involved. Biochemical risk factors are impaired glucose tolerance and decreased insulin response. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Only a few small studies have investigated the possibility of primary prevention of type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: In a six-year intervention study on persons with impaired glucose tolerance in China, diet and/or increased physical activity reduced the risk of type 2 diabetes by 30 to 50%. Similar results were found in a study from Sweden. No drug is shown to prevent type 2 diabetes. Possible candidates are metformin and thiazolidinediones which increase insulin sensitivity, and pancreatic lipase inhibitors which reduce the absorption of fat from the gut. Three large, randomised, prospective studies are investigating whether life style intervention or medication can prevent the disease. The results of these studies will be available in about five years. INTERPRETATION: Present evidence clearly indicates that increased physical activity and diet can prevent the development of type 2 diabetes.
PubMed ID
11475232 View in PubMed
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[Diet and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease--are our recommendations good enough?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53924
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Mar 30;121(9):1092-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-30-2001
Author
L K Johnson
I. Hjermann
S. Tonstad
Author Affiliation
Hjerterehabiliteringen Medisinsk avdeling Sentralsykehuset i Vestfold 3116 Tønsberg. lkjohn@frisurf.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Mar 30;121(9):1092-8
Date
Mar-30-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coronary Disease - diet therapy - mortality - prevention & control
Diet, Atherogenic
Diet, Fat-Restricted
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Services
English Abstract
Fish Oils - administration & dosage
Food Habits
Humans
Lipids - blood
Oleic Acids - administration & dosage
Practice Guidelines
Randomized Controlled Trials
Vegetables
alpha-Linolenic Acid - administration & dosage
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Dietary treatment plays an important role in prevention of coronary heart disease. In Norway as in other European countries, patients with established coronary heart disease are advised to follow a cholesterol-lowering diet. However, epidemiological observations have suggested that Mediterranean and other diets may have cardioprotective characteristics beyond their effects on serum total and LDL cholesterol levels. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We describe the results of randomised, controlled clinical trials that have investigated the effect of diet on secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. RESULTS: Diets characterised by high contents of oleic acid (18: 1n-9), alpha-linolenic acid (18: 3n-3) and fish or fish oil and near-vegetarian diets have reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with coronary heart disease. INTERPRETATION: Several characteristics of the Mediterranean diet seem to have additional anti-atherothrombogenic effects beyond those observed with the usually recommended cholesterol-lowering diet. We ask whether Norwegian dietary recommendations for secondary prevention, should emphasise more strongly the type of fat used and fruit and vegetable intake, in line with the principles of the Mediterranean diet. Such dietary advice should be incorporated into the medical treatment given to all patients with coronary heart disease, regardless of their lipid profile.
PubMed ID
11354888 View in PubMed
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[Does organized mammographic screening reduce breast cancer mortality? The Cancer Registry's view on the current debate]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19278
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Jan 20;122(2):211-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-2002

[Does physical exercise at the workplace have any effect on sick leave?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50035
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Apr 30;118(11):1718-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-1998
Author
B. Alvestad
H N Jenssen
L. Larun
J. Palner
A. Røsberg
U. Saetre
Author Affiliation
Statens institutt for folkehelse, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Apr 30;118(11):1718-21
Date
Apr-30-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Controlled Clinical Trials
English Abstract
Exercise
Humans
Norway
Physical Fitness
Randomized Controlled Trials
Sick Leave
Abstract
The objective of the study was to ascertain whether physical activity at the workplace reduces the amount of sick leave. The databases Medline and Spri-line, reference lists, and professional expertise were consulted for information on the subject. We included random controlled trials, and controlled trials studying the effect on sick leave of physical activity at the worksite. Four trials were identified, including one carried out in Norway. The small number of trials limits the value of any conclusions and highlights the need for more research. The results of the four trials do not indicate that physical activity at the workplace reduces sick leave.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Jan 10;119(1):8510025215
PubMed ID
9621761 View in PubMed
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[HIV screening of pregnant women in Norway]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7524
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Jan 20;120(2):221-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-2000
Author
L M Reinar
A. Haegeland
M F Tollefsen
W. Bjørkeng
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for informasjon og dokumentasjon Statens institutt for folkehelse, Oslo. liv.merete.reinar@folkehelsa.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Jan 20;120(2):221-4
Date
Jan-20-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS Serodiagnosis
Anti-HIV Agents - therapeutic use
Disease Transmission, Vertical
English Abstract
Female
HIV Infections - diagnosis - prevention & control - transmission
HIV Seropositivity - diagnosis
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Mass Screening
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - diagnosis - prevention & control - virology
Randomized Controlled Trials
Abstract
The prevalence of HIV infection among pregnant women is low in Norway (4.5/100,000). HIV screening has been offered on a routine basis in antenatal care since 1987. 96% of all pregnant women are screened for HIV. After the introduction of the screening programme, effective treatment (zidovudin) has become available to pregnant women. This treatment reduces mother-to-child transmission of HIV by two thirds. By screening all pregnant women during a period of two years (95% confidence interval 1-6 years), transmission can be reduced to one child if the HIV positive women are offered and accept treatment. According to a review presented here, doctors and midwives involved in antenatal care do not seem to have good enough routines for giving women information about the screening test and for offering informed choices.
PubMed ID
10851920 View in PubMed
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[Is treatment of diabetes too complicated for general practitioners?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47800
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Sep 20;120(22):2678-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-2000
Author
T. Claudi
J G Cooper
C. Daae
Author Affiliation
Rønvik Legesenter, Bodø. tclaudi@online.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Sep 20;120(22):2678-82
Date
Sep-20-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Clinical Competence
Controlled Clinical Trials
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - drug therapy - nursing
Diabetic Angiopathies - prevention & control
English Abstract
Family Practice - standards
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - administration & dosage
Norway
Practice Guidelines
Prospective Studies
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Randomized Controlled Trials
Risk factors
Abstract
The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing rapidly. In order to reduce the morbidity and mortality of type 2 diabetes, it is important to treat both hyperglycaemia and risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This means that diabetes care is becoming increasingly comprehensive and complicated. Studies in Norway show that diabetes care in general practice could be improved. The primary care system needs more resources and better organisation to be able to meet the demands for improved quality and more comprehensive care. We suggest more active use of nurses and other health care professionals, as well as changes in the remuneration system for general practitioners. Remuneration for an annual review of patients with diabetes will stimulate quality improvement work. The division of work between primary health care and hospital clinics should be clarified.
PubMed ID
11077516 View in PubMed
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[Laparoscopic surgery in Norway. A 5-year retrospective study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212113
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Apr 30;116(11):1315
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-1996
Author
T. Buanes
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Apr 30;116(11):1315
Date
Apr-30-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
History, 20th Century
Humans
Laparoscopy - history
Norway
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Research
Retrospective Studies
PubMed ID
8658409 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.