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130 records – page 1 of 13.

Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Aug 15;125(4):338
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-1981
Author
P K Basu
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Aug 15;125(4):338
Date
Aug-15-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acids - adverse effects
Animals
Canada
Eye Diseases - etiology
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Rabbits
Rain
Swimming
Weather
Notes
Cites: Can J Ophthalmol. 1978 Oct;13(4):247-933753
PubMed ID
7272884 View in PubMed
Less detail

Amphibian recovery after a decrease in acidic precipitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295731
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(3):355-367
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Dag Dolmen
Anders Gravbrøt Finstad
Jon Kristian Skei
Author Affiliation
Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU University Museum, 7491, Trondheim, Norway. dag.dolmen@ntnu.no.
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(3):355-367
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Amphibians
Animals
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Norway
Population Dynamics
Rain
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Abstract
We here report the first sign of amphibian recovery after a strong decline due to acidic precipitation over many decades and peaking around 1980-90. In 2010, the pH level of ponds and small lakes in two heavily acidified areas in southwestern Scandinavia (Aust-Agder and Østfold in Norway) had risen significantly at an (arithmetic) average of 0.14 since 1988-89. Parallel with the general rise in pH, amphibians (Rana temporaria, R. arvalis, Bufo bufo, Lissotriton vulgaris, and Triturus cristatus) had become significantly more common: the frequency of amphibian localities rose from 33% to 49% (n = 115), and the average number of amphibian species per locality had risen from 0.51 to 0.88. In two other (reference) areas, one with better buffering capacity (Telemark, n = 21) and the other with much less input of acidic precipitation (Nord-Trøndelag, n = 106), there were no significant changes in pH or amphibians.
Notes
Cites: BMC Evol Biol. 2011 Dec 19;11:366 PMID 22182445
Cites: Ecotoxicology. 1993 Mar;2(1):65-77 PMID 24203120
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Oct 1;45(19):8403-10 PMID 21851093
Cites: Environ Pollut. 1991;71(2-4):305-28 PMID 15092122
Cites: ILAR J. 2007;48(3):270-7 PMID 17592188
Cites: Science. 2004 Dec 3;306(5702):1783-6 PMID 15486254
Cites: Environ Toxicol Chem. 2012 Jun;31(6):1416-21 PMID 22488839
Cites: J Evol Biol. 2011 Apr;24(4):699-711 PMID 21272107
Cites: Nature. 2000 Oct 19;407(6806):856-7; discussion 857-8 PMID 11057655
Cites: Ambio. 2013 Sep;42(5):577-86 PMID 23288615
PubMed ID
29164539 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of precipitation-related motor vehicle collision and injury risk using insurance and police record information for Winnipeg, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129552
Source
J Safety Res. 2011 Oct;42(5):383-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Brian N Mills
Jean Andrey
Derrick Hambly
Author Affiliation
Adaptation and Impacts Research Section, Environment Canada, c/o Faculty of Environment, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Safety Res. 2011 Oct;42(5):383-90
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - economics - statistics & numerical data
Automobile Driving - statistics & numerical data
Automobiles - economics - statistics & numerical data
Confidence Intervals
Humans
Insurance, Accident - economics - statistics & numerical data
Manitoba - epidemiology
Police - statistics & numerical data
Rain
Risk
Risk Assessment - methods
Snow
Visual Perception - physiology
Wounds and Injuries - economics - epidemiology
Abstract
Police records are the most common source of data used to estimate motor-vehicle collision risks, understand causal or contributing factors, and evaluate the efficacy of interventions. The literature notes concerns about this information citing discrepancies between police reports and other sources of injury occurrence and severity data. The primary objective of the analysis was to assess the adequacy of police reports for an examination of weather-related injury collision risk.
Analyses of relative risk were carried out using both police records and comprehensive insurance claim data for Winnipeg, Canada over the period 1999-2001.
Both data sets yielded very similar results-precipitation substantially increases the risk of injury collision (police records: RR 1.76, CI 1.55-2.00; insurance: RR 1.80, CI 1.62-1.99) and risk of injury (police records, RR 1.74, CI 1.55-1.96; insurance, RR 1.69, CI 1.55-1.85) relative to corresponding dry weather control periods. Both rainfall and snowfall were associated with large increases in collisions and injuries.
While relative risks are almost identical, over 64% more injury collisions and 74% more injuries were identified using the insurance data, which is an important difference for evaluating absolute risk and exposure.
PubMed ID
22093573 View in PubMed
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Annual variation of deoxynivalenol in Danish wheat flour 1998-2003 and estimated daily intake by the Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78422
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2007 Mar;24(3):315-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Rasmussen Peter Have
Petersen Annette
Ghorbani Faranak
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute for Food and Veterinary Research - Food Chemistry, Mørkhøj Bygade 19, Søborg 2860, Denmark. phr@dfvf.dk
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2007 Mar;24(3):315-25
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid - methods
Denmark
Flour - analysis
Food Analysis - methods
Food contamination - analysis
Food Habits
Humans
Mass Spectrometry - methods
Rain
Seasons
Temperature
Trichothecenes - administration & dosage - analysis
Triticum - chemistry
Abstract
The occurrence of deoxynivalenol (DON) in Danish wheat flour was studied during the period 1998-2003 by either capillary gas chromatography with electron capture detection and liquid chromatography coupled to an ion trap mass spectrophotometer. A total of 151 samples were collected from mills and the retail market in Denmark. Contamination levels varied considerably from year-to-year with the highest concentrations occurring in samples from the 2002 harvest with mean and median concentrations of 255 and 300 microg kg(-1), respectively. Compared to other harvest years, 2002 had the highest amount of precipitation around flowering time, i.e. from the end of June to the beginning of July covering weeks 25-27. The lowest average levels were found in samples from the 2001 harvest, where weeks 25-27 were dry compared with other harvest years. The highest value (705 microg kg(-1)) was obtained in a flour sample from the 2002 harvest, but none of the tested samples exceeded the maximum limit of 750 microg kg(-1), which has been recently introduced by the European Commission for DON in flour used as raw materials in food products. Calculation of chronic or usual intake by a deterministic approach showed that intake did not exceed the TDI of 1 microg kg(-1) bw day(-1) either for the whole population or for children. A probabilistic approach also showed that intake in general was below the TDI, but intake for children in the 99% percentile amounted to more than 75% of the TDI. The highest intake is calculated to be 2.5 microg kg(-1) bw day(-1).
PubMed ID
17364935 View in PubMed
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Arctic hydrology during global warming at the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95711
Source
Nature. 2006 Aug 10;442(7103):671-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-2006
Author
Pagani Mark
Pedentchouk Nikolai
Huber Matthew
Sluijs Appy
Schouten Stefan
Brinkhuis Henk
Damsté Jaap S Sinninghe
Dickens Gerald R
Author Affiliation
Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, PO Box 208109, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA. mark.pagani@yale.edu
Source
Nature. 2006 Aug 10;442(7103):671-5
Date
Aug-10-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alkanes - metabolism
Arctic Regions
Biological Markers - analysis
Calcium Carbonate - analysis - metabolism
Carbon - metabolism
Carbon Isotopes
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Greenhouse Effect
History, Ancient
Humidity
Hydrogen - analysis - chemistry
Marine Biology
Oceans and Seas
Plants - metabolism
Rain
Seawater - analysis - chemistry
Sodium Chloride - analysis
Temperature
Time Factors
Abstract
The Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum represents a period of rapid, extreme global warming 55 million years ago, superimposed on an already warm world. This warming is associated with a severe shoaling of the ocean calcite compensation depth and a >2.5 per mil negative carbon isotope excursion in marine and soil carbonates. Together these observations indicate a massive release of 13C-depleted carbon and greenhouse-gas-induced warming. Recently, sediments were recovered from the central Arctic Ocean, providing the first opportunity to evaluate the environmental response at the North Pole at this time. Here we present stable hydrogen and carbon isotope measurements of terrestrial-plant- and aquatic-derived n-alkanes that record changes in hydrology, including surface water salinity and precipitation, and the global carbon cycle. Hydrogen isotope records are interpreted as documenting decreased rainout during moisture transport from lower latitudes and increased moisture delivery to the Arctic at the onset of the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum, consistent with predictions of poleward storm track migrations during global warming. The terrestrial-plant carbon isotope excursion (about -4.5 to -6 per mil) is substantially larger than those of marine carbonates. Previously, this offset was explained by the physiological response of plants to increases in surface humidity. But this mechanism is not an effective explanation in this wet Arctic setting, leading us to hypothesize that the true magnitude of the excursion--and associated carbon input--was greater than originally surmised. Greater carbon release and strong hydrological cycle feedbacks may help explain the maintenance of this unprecedented warmth.
Notes
Erratum In: Nature. 2006 Oct 5;443(7111):598
PubMed ID
16906647 View in PubMed
Less detail

The arctic water resource vulnerability index: an integrated assessment tool for community resilience and vulnerability with respect to freshwater.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92966
Source
Environ Manage. 2008 Sep;42(3):523-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Alessa Lilian
Kliskey Andrew
Lammers Richard
Arp Chris
White Dan
Hinzman Larry
Busey Robert
Author Affiliation
Resilience and Adaptive Management Group, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3211 Providence Drive, Anchorage, AK, 99508, USA.
Source
Environ Manage. 2008 Sep;42(3):523-41
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
Ecosystem
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Fresh Water - analysis
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Rain
Risk assessment
Water Supply - analysis - standards
Abstract
People in the Arctic face uncertainty in their daily lives as they contend with environmental changes at a range of scales from local to global. Freshwater is a critical resource to people, and although water resource indicators have been developed that operate from regional to global scales and for midlatitude to equatorial environments, no appropriate index exists for assessing the vulnerability of Arctic communities to changing water resources at the local scale. The Arctic Water Resource Vulnerability Index (AWRVI) is proposed as a tool that Arctic communities can use to assess their relative vulnerability-resilience to changes in their water resources from a variety of biophysical and socioeconomic processes. The AWRVI is based on a social-ecological systems perspective that includes physical and social indicators of change and is demonstrated in three case study communities/watersheds in Alaska. These results highlight the value of communities engaging in the process of using the AWRVI and the diagnostic capability of examining the suite of constituent physical and social scores rather than the total AWRVI score alone.
PubMed ID
18560929 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing receptivity for change in urban stormwater management and contexts for action.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266348
Source
J Environ Manage. 2014 Dec 15;146:29-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2014
Author
Annicka Cettner
Richard Ashley
Annelie Hedström
Maria Viklander
Source
J Environ Manage. 2014 Dec 15;146:29-41
Date
Dec-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Conservation of Natural Resources
Humans
Policy
Questionnaires
Rain
Sweden
Urban health
Water Movements
Water supply
Abstract
Individual and organisational receptivity for change towards the use of sustainable stormwater management systems has been previously examined, but the significance of the different contexts for achieving this has been largely unexplored. This paper examines the significance of contexts associated to the actions to bring this about by proposing and evaluating an emerging framework based on two related receptivity theories: the individual or organisational approach and the contextual approach. Results from a Swedish national questionnaire with professionals in stormwater management have been used, together with a limited number of interviews to develop and understand the validity of the framework. The analysis has indicated that the respondents were professionally prepared for change (action) but not practically prepared due to inadequate supportive contexts. In response, a number of potential contexts associated to the necessary actions were identified. The framework was found to provide new insights into the influence of receptive contexts for a change in water management practice. These insights can be used by policy makers and others to better support the realization of professional openness for change and thus accelerate the process of change to sustainable stormwater practice.
PubMed ID
25156263 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing the robustness of raingardens under climate change using SDSM and temporal downscaling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293433
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2018 Mar; 77(5-6):1640-1650
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Erle Kristvik
Guro Heimstad Kleiven
Jardar Lohne
Tone Merete Muthanna
Author Affiliation
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), S. P. Andersens veg 5, 7491 Trondheim, Norway E-mail: erle.kristvik@ntnu.no.
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2018 Mar; 77(5-6):1640-1650
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cities
Climate change
Drainage, Sanitary
Floods
Norway
Rain
Time Factors
Water Movements
Abstract
Climate change is expected to lead to higher precipitation amounts and intensities causing an increase of the risk for flooding and combined sewer overflows in urban areas. To cope with these changes, water managers are requesting practical tools that can facilitate adaptive planning. This study was carried out to investigate how recent developments in downscaling techniques can be used to assess the effects of adaptive measures. A combined spatial-temporal downscaling methodology using the Statistical DownScaling Model-Decision Centric (SDSM-DC) and the Generalized Extreme Value distribution was applied to project future precipitation in the city of Bergen, Norway. A raingarden was considered a potential adaptive measure, and its performance was assessed using the RECARGA simulation tool. The benefits and limitations of using the proposed method have been demonstrated and compared to current design practices in Norway. Large differences in the raingarden's performance with respect to percentage overflow and lag-time reduction were found for varying projections. This highlights the need for working with a range of possible futures. Further, it was found that Ksat was the determining factor for peak-flow reduction and that different values of Ksat had different benefits. Engineering flexible solutions by combining measures holding different characteristics will induce robust adaptation.
PubMed ID
29595166 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of LID practices for restoring pre-development runoff regime in an urbanized catchment in southern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268713
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2015;71(10):1485-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Mingfu Guan
Nora Sillanpää
Harri Koivusalo
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2015;71(10):1485-91
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer simulation
Environmental monitoring
Finland
Hydrology
Models, Theoretical
Rain - chemistry
Urbanization
Abstract
This study quantifies the effects of common stormwater management techniques on urban runoff generation. Simulated flow rates for different low impact development (LID) scenarios were compared with observed flow rates during different urban construction phases in a catchment (12.3 ha) that was developed from natural forest to a residential area over a monitoring period of 5 years. The Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) was calibrated and validated against the observed flow rates in the fully developed catchment conditions, and it was then applied to parameterize the LID measures and produce scenarios of their hydrological impacts. The results from the LID scenarios were compared with the observed flow rates in the pre-development and the partially developed catchment conditions. The results show that LID controls reduce urban runoff towards the flow conditions in the partially developed catchment, but the reduction effect diminishes during large rainfall events. The hydrographs with LID are still clearly different from the observed pre-development levels. Although the full restoration of pre-development flow conditions was not feasible, a combination of several measures controlling both volumes and retention times of storm runoff appeared to be effective for managing the stormwater runoff and mitigating the negative impacts of urban development.
PubMed ID
26442490 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between farming activities, precipitation, and the risk of acute gastrointestinal illness in rural municipalities of Quebec, Canada: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145746
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Yossi Febriani
Patrick Levallois
Suzanne Gingras
Pierre Gosselin
Shannon E Majowicz
Manon D Fleury
Author Affiliation
Unité de recherche en santé publique, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire du Québec, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:48
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Agriculture
Analysis of Variance
Child
Child, Preschool
Cities
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Rain
Risk factors
Rural Population
Seasons
Young Adult
Abstract
Increasing livestock density and animal manure spreading, along with climate factors such as heavy rainfall, may increase the risk of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI). In this study we evaluated the association between farming activities, precipitation and AGI.
A cross-sectional telephone survey of randomly selected residents (n = 7006) of 54 rural municipalities in Quebec, Canada, was conducted between April 2007 and April 2008. AGI symptoms and several risk factors were investigated using a phone questionnaire. We calculated the monthly prevalence of AGI, and used multivariate logistic regression, adjusting for several demographic and risk factors, to evaluate the associations between AGI and both intensive farming activities and cumulative weekly precipitation. Cumulative precipitation over each week, from the first to sixth week prior to the onset of AGI, was analyzed to account for both the delayed effect of precipitation on AGI, and the incubation period of causal pathogens. Cumulative precipitation was treated as a four-category variable: high (> or = 90th percentile), moderate (50th to
Notes
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PubMed ID
20113516 View in PubMed
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130 records – page 1 of 13.