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Achievements and current activities of the Canadian radon program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133193
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2011 Jul;146(1-3):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Jing Chen
Ken Ford
Jeff Whyte
Kelley Bush
Deborah Moir
Jack Cornett
Author Affiliation
Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, 775 Brookfield Road, Ottawa, Canada K1A 1C1. jing.chen@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2011 Jul;146(1-3):14-8
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Canada
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Radiation monitoring
Radon - analysis
Abstract
Based on new scientific information and broad public consultation, the Government of Canada updated the guideline for exposure to indoor radon and launched a multi-year radon program in 2007. Major achievements accomplished in the past 3 y and current activities underway are highlighted here.
PubMed ID
21729938 View in PubMed
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Activity concentrations of 226Ra and 228Ra in drilled well water in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168789
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2006;121(4):406-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
P. Vesterbacka
T. Turtiainen
S. Heinävaara
H. Arvela
Author Affiliation
STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, PO Box 14, 00881 Helsinki, Finland. pia.vesterbacka@stuk.fi
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2006;121(4):406-12
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Background Radiation
Body Burden
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Finland
Humans
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radiation Protection - methods
Radon - analysis
Relative Biological Effectiveness
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
The activity concentrations of (226)Ra and (228)Ra in drinking water were determined in water samples from 176 drilled wells. (226)Ra activity concentrations were in the range of
PubMed ID
16777909 View in PubMed
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The annual effective dose from natural sources of ionising radiation in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181012
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2004;108(3):215-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
R L Grasty
J R LaMarre
Author Affiliation
Gamma-Bob Inc., 3924 Shirley Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario K1V 1H4, Canada. grasty@rogers.com
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2004;108(3):215-26
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Background Radiation
Body Burden
Canada - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Monitoring - methods - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiological Monitoring
Geography - methods
Humans
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Protection - methods
Radiation, Ionizing
Radiometry - methods - statistics & numerical data
Radon - analysis
Relative Biological Effectiveness
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
A review and analysis of published information combined with the results of recent gamma ray surveys were used to determine the annual effective dose to Canadians from natural sources of radiation. The dose due to external radiation was determined from ground gamma ray surveys carried out in the cities of Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal and Winnipeg and was calculated to be 219 microSv. A compilation of airborne gamma ray data from Canada and the United States shows that there are large variations in external radiation with the highest annual outdoor level of 1424 microSv being found in northern Canada. The annual effective inhalation dose of 926 microSv from 222Rn and 220Rn was calculated from approximately 14,000 measurements across Canada. This value includes a contribution of 128 microSv from 222Rn in the outdoor air together with 6 microSv from long-lived uranium and thorium series radionuclides in dust particles. Based on published information, the annual effective dose due to internal radioactivity is 306 microSv. A program developed by the Federal Aviation Administration was used to calculate a population-weighted annual effective dose from cosmic radiation of 318 microSv. The total population-weighted average annual effective dose to Canadians from all sources of natural background radiation was calculated to be 1769 microSv but varies significantly from city to city, largely due to differences in the inhalation dose from 222Rn.
PubMed ID
15031443 View in PubMed
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An updated assessment of radon exposure in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145293
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2010 Jul;140(2):166-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Jing Chen
Deborah Moir
Author Affiliation
Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Canada K1A 1C1. jing.chen@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2010 Jul;140(2):166-70
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Canada
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Radiation monitoring
Radon - analysis
Abstract
Based on data from a national residential radon survey performed in 18 cities in Canada in the 1970s, an annual effective dose to the Canadian population due to indoor radon exposure was estimated at 0.71 mSv. An updated estimate of radon exposure in Canada has been made using additional indoor radon data from recent surveys in Ontario and Nova Scotia, and in 28 communities of British Columbia and 15 regions of Quebec. The associated annual effective dose to the Canadian population is now estimated to be 1.15 mSv. The percentage of homes in Canada with radon concentrations above the Canadian Radon Guideline of 200 Bq m(-3) is estimated to be about 3.3 %. As might be expected, this number varies significantly (from a low of 1 % of homes above the Guideline to a high of 19 %) from region to region. Because more radon data are included in the current assessment, and the data set covers broader geographical areas, the current assessment better represents the radon exposure in Canada.
PubMed ID
20172936 View in PubMed
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An update on thoron exposure in Canada with simultaneous ²²²Rn and ²²°Rn measurements in Fredericton and Halifax.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138032
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2011 Nov;147(4):541-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Jing Chen
Deborah Moir
Toon Pronk
Terry Goodwin
Miroslaw Janik
Shinji Tokonami
Author Affiliation
Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, 775 Brookfield Road, Ottawa, Canada. jing.chen@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2011 Nov;147(4):541-7
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Canada
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Gamma Rays
Housing
Humans
Radiation monitoring
Radon - analysis
Radon Daughters - analysis
Abstract
Naturally occurring isotopes of radon in indoor air are identified as the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. Radon-222 (radon gas) and radon-220 (thoron gas) are the most common isotopes of radon. While extensive radon surveys have been conducted, indoor thoron data are very limited. To better assess thoron exposure in Canada, radon/thoron discriminating detectors were deployed in 45 homes in Fredericton and 65 homes in Halifax for a period of 3 months. In this study, radon concentrations ranged from 16 to 1374 Bq m(-3) with a geometric mean (GM) of 82 Bq m(-3) and a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 2.56 in Fredericton, and from 4 to 2341 Bq m(-3) with a GM of 107 Bq m(-3) and a GSD of 3.67 in Halifax. It is estimated that 18 % of Fredericton homes and 32 % of Halifax homes could have radon concentrations above the Canadian indoor radon guideline of 200 Bq m(-3). This conclusion is significantly higher than the previous estimates made 30 y ago with short-term radon measurements. Thoron concentrations were below the detection limit in 62 % of homes in both cities. Among the homes with detectable thoron concentrations, the values varied from 12 to 1977 Bq m(-3) in Fredericton and from 6 to 206 Bq m(-3) in Halifax. The GM and GSD were 86 Bq m(-3) and 3.19 for Fredericton, and 35 Bq m(-3) and 2.35 for Halifax, respectively. On the basis of these results, together with previous measurements in Ottawa, Winnipeg and the Mont-Laurier region of Quebec, it is estimated that thoron contributes ~8 % of the radiation dose due to indoor radon exposure in Canada.
PubMed ID
21216734 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the effectiveness of radon screening programs in reducing lung cancer mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155396
Source
Risk Anal. 2008 Oct;28(5):1221-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Fabien Gagnon
Mathieu Courchesne
Benoît Lévesque
Pierre Ayotte
Jean-Marc Leclerc
Jean-Claude Belles-Isles
Claude Prévost
Jean-Claude Dessau
Author Affiliation
Faculté de Médecine et des sciences de la Santé, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Canada. fabien.gagnon@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Risk Anal. 2008 Oct;28(5):1221-30
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Female
Housing
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Mass Screening - standards
Mortality - trends
Program Evaluation
Quebec - epidemiology
Radiation Monitoring - standards
Radon - analysis
Risk Assessment - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
The present study was aimed at assessing the health consequences of the presence of radon in Quebec homes and the possible impact of various screening programs on lung cancer mortality. Lung cancer risk due to this radioactive gas was estimated according to the cancer risk model developed by the Sixth Committee on Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations. Objective data on residential radon exposure, population mobility, and tobacco use in the study population were integrated into a Monte-Carlo-type model. Participation rates to radon screening programs were estimated from published data. According to the model used, approximately 10% of deaths due to lung cancer are attributable to residential radon exposure on a yearly basis in Quebec. In the long term, the promotion of a universal screening program would prevent less than one death/year on a province-wide scale (0.8 case; IC 99%: -3.6 to 5.2 cases/year), for an overall reduction of 0.19% in radon-related mortality. Reductions in mortality due to radon by (1) the implementation of a targeted screening program in the region with the highest concentrations, (2) the promotion of screening on a local basis with financial support, or (3) the realization of systematic investigations in primary and secondary schools would increase to 1%, 14%, and 16.4%, respectively, in the each of the populations targeted by these scenarios. Other than the battle against tobacco use, radon screening in public buildings thus currently appears as the most promising screening policy for reducing radon-related lung cancer.
PubMed ID
18761730 View in PubMed
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Background concentrations of radon and radon daughters in Canadian homes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245543
Source
Health Phys. 1980 Aug;39(2):285-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1980

Calibration system for measuring the radon flux density.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271780
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2015 Jun;164(4):582-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
A. Onishchenko
M. Zhukovsky
V. Bastrikov
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2015 Jun;164(4):582-6
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adsorption
Algorithms
Calibration
Charcoal
Diffusion
Equipment Design
Mining
Radiation Exposure
Radiation Monitoring - instrumentation - methods
Radon - analysis
Russia
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Uranium
Abstract
The measurement of radon flux from soil surface is the useful tool for the assessment of radon-prone areas and monitoring of radon releases from uranium mining and milling residues. The accumulation chambers with hollow headspace and chambers with activated charcoal are the most used devices for these purposes. Systematic errors of the measurements strongly depend on the geometry of the chamber and diffusion coefficient of the radon in soil. The calibration system for the attestation of devices for radon flux measurements was constructed. The calibration measurements of accumulation chambers and chambers with activated charcoal were conducted. The good agreement between the results of 2D modelling of radon flux and measurements results was observed. It was demonstrated that reliable measurements of radon flux can be obtained by chambers with activated charcoal (equivalent volume ~75 l) or by accumulation chambers with hollow headspace of ~7-10 l and volume/surface ratio (height) of >15 cm.
PubMed ID
25977351 View in PubMed
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Combination of geological data and radon survey results for radon mapping.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125628
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2012 Oct;112:1-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Michael Zhukovsky
Ilia Yarmoshenko
Sergey Kiselev
Author Affiliation
Institute of Industrial Ecology UB RAS, Sophy Kovalevskoy st., 20, Yekaterinburg 620219, GSP-594, Russia. michael@ecko.uran.ru
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2012 Oct;112:1-3
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Environmental Exposure
Geology
Humans
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radon - analysis
Russia
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
The typical method of radon mapping usually used in most countries is the presenting of average radon concentrations in dwellings for districts or regions. Sometimes the maps of radon concentrations in the soil or maps of percentage above the reference level also demonstrated. Such approach not always can be used for identification of the regions with high probability of radon exposure above the reference levels where the population density is low. The combination of archive geological data and the results of representative radon survey allow estimating the typical parameters of radon concentration distribution for selected categories of buildings (multi-storey or rural type houses) situated in geological zones with the different radon potential. In this case it is possible to give grounds for the necessary level of radon protection measures in the new buildings constructed in this region. The use of such approach in Ural region of Russia is demonstrated.
PubMed ID
22466302 View in PubMed
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74 records – page 1 of 8.