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166 records – page 1 of 17.

5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor antagonist with or without short-course dexamethasone in the prophylaxis of radiation induced emesis: a placebo-controlled randomized trial of the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group (SC19).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168273
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2006 Jul 20;24(21):3458-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-20-2006
Author
Rebecca K S Wong
Nancy Paul
Keyue Ding
Marlo Whitehead
Michael Brundage
Anthony Fyles
Derek Wilke
Abdenour Nabid
Andre Fortin
Don Wilson
Michael McKenzie
Ida Ackerman
Luis Souhami
Pierre Chabot
Joseph Pater
Author Affiliation
National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group, Canada. Rebecca.wong@rmp.uhn.on.ca
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2006 Jul 20;24(21):3458-64
Date
Jul-20-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antiemetics - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Canada
Dexamethasone - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nausea - drug therapy - etiology
Ondansetron - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Quality of Life
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Serotonin 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonists
Serotonin Antagonists - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Treatment Outcome
Vomiting - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
To evaluate the effectiveness of prophylactic dexamethasone for the control of radiation induced emesis (RIE) when added to ondansetron during days 1 to 5 of fractionated radiotherapy. The study had two hypotheses: ondansetron and dexamethasone could provide superior control of RIE over ondansetron alone during the prophylactic period and; the combination could provide sustained control of RIE during subsequent fractions of radiotherapy.
Between May 2001 to Jan 2004, 211 patients receiving radiotherapy (> or = 15 fractions) to the upper abdomen were randomly assigned to receive ondansetron 8 mg bid with either dexamethasone 4 mg daily or placebo during fractions 1 to 5. Rescue antiemetics were provided.
During the prophylactic period there was a trend for improved complete control of nausea in the dexamethasone arm (50% v 38%; P = .06) while complete and partial control of emesis, average nausea score, and use of rescue medications were similar in the two groups. During the overall study period patients receiving dexamethasone had better complete control of emesis (23% v 12%; P = .02) and a lower average nausea score (0.28 v 0.39; P = .03); there was a trend towards less use of rescue medications with dexamethasone (70% v 80%; P = .09); other outcomes were similar on the two arms. Quality of life analysis showed a significant difference in appetite.
The addition of dexamethasone to ondansetron as prophylaxis provides a modest improvement in protection against RIE during moderately emetogenic fractionated radiotherapy. It is a potentially useful addition to 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor antagonists in this setting.
PubMed ID
16849762 View in PubMed
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10th International Conference on Long-Term Complications of Treatment of Children and Adolescents for Cancer, Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, Canada, June 6-7, 2008--State of the Art Series. Commentary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151706
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2009 Aug;53(2):248
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009

[20-year experience with modified dose fractionation of radiotherapy in primary Hodgkin's disease].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154608
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2008;54(4):529-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
N V Il'in
E N Nikolaeva
E V Smirnova
Iu N Vinogradova
E I Ivanova
B M Izotov
I A Shenderova
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2008;54(4):529-31
Date
2008
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biomedical research
Disease-Free Survival
Dose Fractionation
Female
Hodgkin Disease - radiotherapy
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Leukopenia - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pericarditis - epidemiology - etiology
Pneumonia - epidemiology - etiology
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Thrombocytopenia - epidemiology - etiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Significantly lower frequency of relapse, incidence of pulmonitis and pericarditis, leukopenia and thrombocytopenia stage IV and longer recurrence-free survival were reported after acceleration of multifractionation of STD of 1.35Gy was used for treatment of patients with primary Hodgkin's disease, as compared with standard fractionation. When STD was reduced to 1.2Gy (modified multifractionation), subtotal exposure of lymph nodes was followed by a significant drop in frequency and severity of leukopenia and thrombocytopenia stage III-IV. The latter complications, rates decreased further, with perspective response to therapy, as irradiation was limited to that of areas exposed during modified multifractionation.
PubMed ID
18942416 View in PubMed
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131I ablation treatment in young females after the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80419
Source
J Nucl Med. 2006 Oct;47(10):1723-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Travis Curtis C
Stabin Michael G
Author Affiliation
Science Applications International Corporation, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. Traviscc@icx.net
Source
J Nucl Med. 2006 Oct;47(10):1723-7
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Child
Female
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Power Plants
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Thyroid Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Ukraine
Whole-Body Counting
Abstract
The Chernobyl accident resulted in a number of cases of thyroid cancer in females under the age of 20 y. Many of these individuals were treated with surgical removal of the thyroid gland followed by 131I ablation of residual thyroid tissue. Epidemiologic evidence demonstrates that 131I treatment for thyroid cancer or hyperthyroidism in adult women confers negligible risk of breast cancer. However, comparable data for younger women do not exist. Studies of external radiation exposure indicate that, for radiation exposures of as low as 0.2-0.7 Gy, the risk of breast cancer is greater for infant and adolescent female breast tissues than for adult female breast tissues. METHODS: The effective half-time of 131I measured in athyrotic patients was used together with the OLINDA/EXM computer code to estimate doses to breast tissue in 10-y-old, 15-y-old, and young adult females from ablation treatment. RESULTS: The dose to pediatric and young adult female breast tissue associated with a 5.6-GBq (150 mCi) ablation treatment may range from 0.35 to 0.55 Gy, resulting in a lifetime risk of breast cancer ranging from 2-4 cases per 100 such individuals exposed and a lifetime risk of solid tumors ranging from 8 to 17 solid tumors per 100 such individuals exposed. Administration of multiple ablation treatments, as often occurs with metastases, could result in doses ranging from 0.7 to 1 Gy, with corresponding increases in the lifetime cancer risk. CONCLUSION: These estimates suggest the need for additional research and a possible need for surveillance of young Chernobyl thyroid cancer patients who received 131I ablation treatment.
Notes
Comment In: J Nucl Med. 2006 Oct;47(10):1563-417015887
Erratum In: J Nucl Med. 2007 Jan;48(1):7
PubMed ID
17015910 View in PubMed
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Adjuvant radiotherapy and risk of contralateral breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24377
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1992 Aug 19;84(16):1245-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-19-1992
Author
H H Storm
M. Andersson
J D Boice
M. Blettner
M. Stovall
H T Mouridsen
P. Dombernowsky
C. Rose
A. Jacobsen
M. Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Rigistry, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen.
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1992 Aug 19;84(16):1245-50
Date
Aug-19-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Breast Neoplasms - etiology - radiotherapy
Case-Control Studies
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Menopause
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Neoplasms, Second Primary - etiology
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The risk of contralateral breast cancer is increased twofold to fivefold for breast cancer patients. A registry-based cohort study in Denmark suggested that radiation treatment of the first breast cancer might increase the risk for contralateral breast cancer among 10-year survivors. PURPOSE: Our goal was to assess the role of radiation in the development of contralateral breast cancer. METHODS: A nested case-control study was conducted in a cohort of 56,540 women in Denmark diagnosed with invasive breast cancer from 1943 through 1978. Case patients were 529 women who developed contralateral breast cancer 8 or more years after first diagnosis. Controls were women with breast cancer who did not develop contralateral breast cancer. One control was matched to each case patient on the basis of age, calendar year of initial breast cancer diagnosis, and survival time. Radiation dose to the contralateral breast was estimated for each patient on the basis of radiation measurements and abstracted treatment information. The anatomical position of each breast cancer was also abstracted from medical records. RESULTS: Radiotherapy had been administered to 82.4% of case patients and controls, and the mean radiation dose to the contralateral breast was estimated to be 2.51 Gy. Radiotherapy did not increase the overall risk of contralateral breast cancer (relative risk = 1.04; 95% confidence interval = 0.74-1.46), and there was no evidence that risk varied with radiation dose, time since exposure, or age at exposure. The second tumors in case patients were evenly distributed in the medial, lateral, and central portions of the breast, a finding that argues against a causal role of radiotherapy in tumorigenesis. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of women in our series were perimenopausal or postmenopausal (53% total versus 38% premenopausal and 9% of unknown status) and received radiotherapy at an age when the breast tissue appears least susceptible to the carcinogenic effects of radiation. Based on a dose of 2.51 Gy and estimates of radiation risk from other studies, a relative risk of only 1.18 would have been expected for a population of women exposed at an average age of 51 years. Thus, our data provide additional evidence that there is little if any risk of radiation-induced breast cancer associated with exposure of breast tissue to low-dose radiation (e.g., from mammographic x rays or adjuvant radiotherapy) in later life.
PubMed ID
1640483 View in PubMed
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Analysis of complications in patients treated with abdomino-pelvic radiation therapy for ovarian carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224708
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1992;22(5):847-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
A W Fyles
A J Dembo
R S Bush
W. Levin
L A Manchul
J F Pringle
G A Rawlings
J F Sturgeon
G M Thomas
J. Simm
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1992;22(5):847-51
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen - radiation effects
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology - radiotherapy
Pelvis - radiation effects
Prospective Studies
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Abstract
Between 1971 and 1985, 598 patients with ovarian carcinoma were treated with abdomino-pelvic radiation therapy. Acute complications included nausea and vomiting in 364 patients (61%) which were severe in 36, and diarrhea in 407 patients (68%), severe in 35. Leukopenia (less than 2.0 x 10(9) cells/liter) and thrombocytopenia (less than 100 x 10(9) cells/liter) occurred in 64 patients (11%) each. Treatment interruptions occurred in 136 patients (23%), and 62 patients (10%) did not complete treatment. In both situations the most common cause was myelosuppression. Late complications included chronic diarrhea in 85 patients (14%), transient hepatic enzyme elevation in 224 (44%), and symptomatic basal pneumonitis in 23 (4%). Serious late bowel complications were infrequent: 25 patients (4.2%) developed bowel obstruction and 16 required operation. Multivariate analysis was unable to determine any significant prognostic factors for bowel obstruction; however, the moving-strip technique of radiation therapy was associated with a significantly greater risk of developing chronic diarrhea, pneumonitis, and hepatic enzyme elevation than was the open beam technique. We conclude that abdomino-pelvic radiation therapy as used in these patients is associated with modest acute complications and a low risk of serious late toxicity.
PubMed ID
1555975 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of primary causes of incidents in a department of radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192991
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Sep 24;163(39):5368-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-24-2001

An assessment of the risk of developing hyperparathyroidism and thyroid disorders subsequent to neck irradiation in middle-aged women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14625
Source
J Surg Oncol. 1985 Jun;29(2):78-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1985
Author
I. Hedman
M. Fjälling
S. Lindberg
L M Lundberg
L E Tisell
Source
J Surg Oncol. 1985 Jun;29(2):78-81
Date
Jun-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Calcium - blood
Cervical Vertebrae
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hyperparathyroidism - blood - etiology
Middle Aged
Neck
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Radiotherapy Dosage
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Spinal Osteophytosis - radiotherapy
Sweden
Thyroid Diseases - etiology
Time Factors
Abstract
We investigated the occurrence of thyroid and parathyroid disorders in 100 women (age 66-70 years) irradiated for cervical spondylosis on average 25 years previously and in 100 control women of similar age. Hyperparathyroidism (HPT), proven by operation, was diagnosed in one patient of each group, and three additional cases were diagnosed biochemically among irradiated women. The difference in incidence is not significant. Nor was there any significant difference in incidence of thyroid disorders. No thyroid carcinoma was found in either group. Even if there is a moderate increase of HPT after neck irradiation in middle-aged women the risk is not so great as to warrant organised follow-up.
PubMed ID
4079389 View in PubMed
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Angiosarcoma after radiotherapy: a cohort study of 332,163 Finnish cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163416
Source
Br J Cancer. 2007 Jul 2;97(1):115-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2-2007
Author
A. Virtanen
E. Pukkala
A. Auvinen
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, FI-33014 University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. anna.virtanen@uta.fi
Source
Br J Cancer. 2007 Jul 2;97(1):115-7
Date
Jul-2-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Hemangiosarcoma - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - drug therapy - radiotherapy
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Neoplasms, Second Primary - epidemiology - etiology
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Risk factors
Abstract
We evaluated the risk of angiosarcoma after radiotherapy among all patients with cancers of breast, cervix uteri, corpus uteri, lung, ovary, prostate, or rectum, and lymphoma diagnosed in Finland during 1953-2003, identified from the Finnish Cancer Registry. Only angiosarcomas of the trunk were considered, this being the target of radiotherapy for the first cancer. In the follow-up of 1.8 million person-years at risk, 19 angiosarcomas developed, all after breast and gynaecological cancer. Excess of angiosarcomas over national incidence rates were observed after radiotherapy without chemotherapy (standardised incidence ratio (SIR) 6.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.7-11), after both radiotherapy and chemotherapy (SIR 100, 95% CI 12-360), and after other treatments (SIR 3.6, 95% CI 1.6-7.1). In the regression analysis however, the adjusted rate ratio for radiotherapy was 1.0 (95% CI 0.23-4.4). Although an increased risk of angiosarcoma among cancer patients is evident, especially with breast and gynaecological cancer, the excess does not appear to be strongly related to radiotherapy.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17519906 View in PubMed
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166 records – page 1 of 17.