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272 records – page 1 of 28.

(3)H activity comparison between FTMC, VNIIM and LNE-LNHB.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278451
Source
Appl Radiat Isot. 2016 Mar;109:41-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Philippe Cassette
Paulius Butkus
Arunas Gudelis
Tatiana Shilnikova
Source
Appl Radiat Isot. 2016 Mar;109:41-3
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
France
Internationality
Laboratories - standards
Lithuania
Nuclear Medicine - standards
Radiation Dosage
Radiometry - standards
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Russia
Scintillation Counting
Sensitivity and specificity
Tritium - analysis - standards
Abstract
An activity comparison of tritiated water was organized in 2013 between 3 laboratories: FTMC (Lithuania), LNE-LNHB (France) and VNIIM (Russia). The solution was prepared by LNHB and ampoules were sent to the others laboratories. This solution was standardized in terms of activity per unit mass by participant laboratories using the Triple to Double Coincidence Ratio (TDCR) method in liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The tritiated water solution is traceable to the solution prepared by LNHB for the CCRI(II)-K2.H-3 2009 (3)H international comparison.
PubMed ID
26651170 View in PubMed
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131I content in the human thyroid estimated from direct measurements of the inhabitants of Russian areas contaminated due to the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30700
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2003;105(1-4):623-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
A A Bratilova
I A Zvonova
M I Balonov
N G Shishkanov
V I Trushin
M. Hoshi
Author Affiliation
Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Mira st. 8, 197136, St Petersburg, Russia. bratilov@comset.net
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2003;105(1-4):623-6
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Computer simulation
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Iodine Radioisotopes - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Male
Metabolic Clearance Rate
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive fallout - analysis
Radiometry - methods
Russia
Thyroid Gland - metabolism
Ukraine
Abstract
The method of processing and the results of measurements of 131I content in the thyroids of Russian people performed in May-June 1986 are presented. The contribution of radiation from Cs radionuclides in the human body was taken into account in the processing of measurement data with an SRP-68-01 device. The greatest individual 131I content was found in the thyroids of inhabitants of the Bryansk region, up to 250-350 kBq, and in the Tula and Orel regions, up to 100 kBq. The average 131I thyroid activity in the middle of May 1986 reached 80 kBq for inhabitants of some settlements in the Bryansk region, 5-8 kBq in the Tula region and 5 kBq in the Orel region.
PubMed ID
14527038 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of central axis dose calculations for photon external radiotherapy beams in Finland: the quality of local beam data and the use of averaged data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159373
Source
Radiother Oncol. 2008 Feb;86(2):264-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Mika Kapanen
Petri Sipilä
Ritva Bly
Hannu Järvinen
Mikko Tenhunen
Author Affiliation
Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Helsinki, Finland. mika.kapanen@hus.fi
Source
Radiother Oncol. 2008 Feb;86(2):264-71
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Feasibility Studies
Finland
Humans
Photons
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Radiometry - methods
Radiotherapy Dosage - standards
Abstract
The accuracy of central axis dose calculation was evaluated for 48 photon beams from 28 linear accelerators at nine centres in Finland. In addition, inter-accelerator consistency of beam data was evaluated for Varian Clinac 600 CDs and 2100 CDs, and averaged data sets were generated for output factors (OFs) and percentage depth doses (PDDs). The averaged data sets obtained were used to identify potential dosimetry reasons for local errors.
Agreement between measured and calculated doses was determined at isocentre at 10 cm depth in water for nine different sized open square and rectangular fields. Averaged OFs were determined for nominal energies of 4, 6, 10, 15 and 18 MV both at d(max) and at a 10-cm depth. In order to develop a function for the OF data, OFs for square fields were parameterised through empirical model fitting. The feasibility of a simple equivalent square collimator formula was also evaluated for the presentation of OFs for rectangular fields. Averaged PDDs were determined at a 10-cm depth.
The difference between measured and calculated doses exceeded +/-3%, +/-2% and +/-1% for 3, 6 and 35 of the investigated 48 beams, respectively. The differences were due to errors observed in both OFs and depth dose data. When the agreement between dose calculation and measurement was within +/-1%, inter-accelerator differences in OFs were within +/-1.0% at both the depth of dose maximum and at 10 cm for Clinac 600 CDs and also for 2100 CDs. Differences in PDDs were within +/-1.2%.
The importance of quality control for beam data was demonstrated by showing significant errors in measured data. For Clinac 600 and 2100 CDs, the quality control can be accurately performed by comparing local data to averaged reference data. Robust averaged data sets were obtained for 6, 15 and 18 MV beams of Clinac 2100 CDs.
PubMed ID
18192045 View in PubMed
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Age dependence of natural uranium and thorium concentrations in bone.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165657
Source
Health Phys. 2007 Feb;92(2):119-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Dominic Larivière
Ana Paula Packer
Leonora Marro
Chunsheng Li
Jing Chen
R Jack Cornett
Author Affiliation
Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, 775 Brookfield Road, Address Locator 6302D1, Ottawa, ON, Canada, K1A. dominic_lariviere@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Health Phys. 2007 Feb;92(2):119-26
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Background Radiation
Body Burden
Bone and Bones - chemistry
Canada
Humans
Radiation Dosage
Radiometry - methods
Relative Biological Effectiveness
Thorium - analysis
Uranium - analysis
Abstract
The age dependence of the natural concentration of uranium and thorium in the skeleton was investigated using human vertebrae bone collected from two Canadian locations (Winnipeg, Manitoba, and Regina, Saskatchewan). The concentration of both radioelements in digested ashed bone samples was determined using sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The geometric means for uranium level in bones showed a significant statistical difference between the two locations studied. Similarly for thorium, a statistical difference was observed, although this difference was considered marginal. The thorium concentration differed only marginally with respect to age group, indicating that its behavior in the body could be age-independent. Conversely, the uranium level in bones was found to change for the age groups tested, an indication of age-specific deposition. The age profile for uranium was comparable to the calcium turn-over rate, indicating that uranium deposition is probably, in part, dictated by this metabolic process, showing the role of present uptake into the uranium concentration in bones for populations exposed to significant uranium intake.
PubMed ID
17220713 View in PubMed
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Aircrew exposure from cosmic radiation on commercial airline routes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193325
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2001;93(4):293-314
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
B J Lewis
M J McCall
A R Green
L G Bennett
M. Pierre
U J Schrewe
K. O'Brien
E. Felsberger
Author Affiliation
Royal Military College of Canada, P.O. Box 17000, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7K 7B4. lewis-b@rmc.ca
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2001;93(4):293-314
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Altitude
Aviation
Canada
Cosmic Radiation
Humans
Occupational Exposure
Radiation Dosage
Radiometry - instrumentation - methods
Abstract
As a result of the recent recommendations of the ICRP 60, and in anticipation of possible regulation on occupational exposure of Canadian-based aircrew, an extensive study was carried out by the Royal Military College of Canada over a one-year period to measure the cosmic radiation at commercial jet altitudes. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter was used to measure the ambient total dose equivalent rate on 62 flight routes, resulting in over 20,000 data points at one-minute intervals at various altitudes and geomagnetic latitudes (i.e. which span the full cut-off rigidity of the Earth's magnetic field). These data were then compared to similar experimental work at the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, using a different suite of equipment, to measure separately the low and high linear energy transfer components of the mixed radiation field, and to predictions with the LUIN transport code. All experimental and theoretical results were in excellent agreement. From these data, a semiempirical model was developed to allow for the interpolation of the dose rate for any global position, altitude and date (i.e. heliocentric potential). Through integration of the dose rate function over a great circle flight path, a computer code was developed to provide an estimate of the total dose equivalent on any route worldwide at any period in the solar cycle.
PubMed ID
11548357 View in PubMed
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[An algorithm for the reconstruction of irradiation doses based on computational and instrumental methods].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198086
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2000 Feb;321(2):61-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000

Analysis of mortality among Canadian nuclear power industry workers after chronic low-dose exposure to ionizing radiation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179974
Source
Radiat Res. 2004 Jun;161(6):633-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Lydia B Zablotska
J Patrick Ashmore
Geoffrey R Howe
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA. lbz7@columbia.edu
Source
Radiat Res. 2004 Jun;161(6):633-41
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Female
Humans
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - mortality
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Power Plants - statistics & numerical data
Radiation Dosage
Radiation, Ionizing
Radiometry - methods
Registries
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Studies of radiation-associated risks among workers chronically exposed to low doses of radiation are important, both to estimate risks directly and to assess the adequacy of extrapolations of risk estimates from high-dose studies. This paper presents results based on a cohort of 45,468 nuclear power industry workers from the Canadian National Dose Registry monitored for more than 1 year for chronic low-dose whole-body ionizing radiation exposures sometime between 1957 and 1994 (mean duration of monitoring = 7.4 years, mean cumulative equivalent dose = 13.5 mSv). The excess relative risks for leukemia [excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)] and for all solid cancers were 52.5 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.205, 291] and 2.80 (95% CI: -0.038, 7.13) per sievert, respectively, both associations having P values close to 0.05. Relative risks by dose categories increased monotonically for leukemia excluding CLL but were less consistent for all solid cancers combined. Although the point estimates are higher than those found in other studies of whole-body irradiation, the difference could well be due to chance. Further follow-up of this cohort or the combination of results from multiple worker studies will produce more stable estimates and thus complement the risk estimates from higher-dose studies.
PubMed ID
15161357 View in PubMed
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Analysis of symmetrical translocations for retrospective biodosimetry in radiation workers of the Mayak nuclear-industrial complex (Southern Urals) using FISH-chromosome painting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204096
Source
Int J Radiat Biol. 1998 Oct;74(4):431-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
K. Salassidis
H. Braselmann
N D Okladnikova
S. Pressl
G. Stephan
G. Snigiryova
M. Bauchinger
Author Affiliation
GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiobiology, Neuherberg, Germany.
Source
Int J Radiat Biol. 1998 Oct;74(4):431-9
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Chromosome Aberrations
Chromosomes - radiation effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Female
Gamma Rays - adverse effects
Humans
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Lymphocytes
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - etiology
Occupational Diseases
Occupational Exposure
Plutonium - toxicity
Radiometry
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Translocation, Genetic - genetics
Abstract
Frequencies of symmetrical translocations were determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for retrospective biodosimetry in workers occupationally exposed to external gamma-rays and internal plutonium at the Mayak nuclear-industrial complex (Southern Urals, Russia).
Chromosome analyses were carried out on peripheral lymphocytes from 75 Mayak workers who had received their main exposures between 1948 and 1963. Cumulative external gamma-ray doses between 0.02 and 9.91 Sv and plutonium burdens ranging between 0.26 and 18.5 kBq are reported. As controls, 33 unexposed persons from non-contaminated areas of the Southern Urals were used. Whole-chromosome painting probes for chromosomes 1, 4 and 12 were used simultaneously with a pancentromeric probe.
Compared with the control group, a significantly elevated translocation frequency was found for the total study group and for either of two subsets with (48 subjects) and without (27 subjects) plutonium incorporation. The dicentric frequency was not significantly different from the control level. In the pooled data set, translocation frequencies showed a significant dependence on cumulative external gamma-ray doses. Plutonium uptake had no substantial influence. Individual dose estimates for 21 cases exhibiting at least five translocations ranged between 0.5 and 1.8 Gy, which is substantially lower than the workers' registered personal doses.
At 35-40 years after protracted exposure to low-dose rate external gamma-rays, the postulated lifetime stability of translocations cannot be confirmed. Apparently, the natural loss of translocation-bearing peripheral lymphocytes cannot be fully compensated so that a temporal decline even of transmissible aberrations takes place. As a consequence, individual retrospective biodosimetry estimates cannot be obtained reliably from the remaining fraction of translocations.
PubMed ID
9798953 View in PubMed
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272 records – page 1 of 28.