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112 records – page 1 of 12.

[6-week vacation 1946 but now the law on roentgen leave is undermined. Protests from professional quarters - radiation injuries still bad].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247085
Source
Vardfacket. 1979 Jun 28;3(12):50-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-28-1979

Activity-based costing in radiology. Application in a pediatric radiological unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32870
Source
Acta Radiol. 2000 Mar;41(2):189-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
J. Laurila
I. Suramo
M. Brommels
E M Tolppanen
P. Koivukangas
P. Lanning
G. Standertskjöld-Nordenstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Acta Radiol. 2000 Mar;41(2):189-95
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cost Savings
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health Care Rationing - economics
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Pediatrics - economics
Radiology Department, Hospital - economics
Time and Motion Studies
Abstract
PURPOSE: To get an informative and detailed picture of the resource utilization in a radiology department in order to support its pricing and management. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A system based mainly on the theoretical foundations of activity-based costing (ABC) was designed, tested and compared with conventional costing. The study was performed at the Pediatric Unit of the Department of Radiology, Oulu University Hospital. The material consisted of all the 7,452 radiological procedures done in the unit during the first half of 1994, when both methods of costing where in use. Detailed cost data were obtained from the hospital financial and personnel systems and then related to activity data captured in the radiology information system. RESULTS: The allocation of overhead costs was greatly reduced by the introduction of ABC compared to conventional costing. The overhead cost as a percentage of total costs dropped to one-fourth of total costs, from 57% to 16%. The change of unit costs of radiological procedures varied from -42% to +82%. CONCLUSION: Costing is much more detailed and precise, and the percentage of unspecified allocated overhead costs diminishes drastically when ABC is used. The new information enhances effective departmental management, as the whole process of radiological procedures is identifiable by single activities, amenable to corrective actions and process improvement.
PubMed ID
10741796 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of primary causes of incidents in a department of radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192991
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Sep 24;163(39):5368-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-24-2001

[A nation-wide survey: striking differences in the diagnostic procedures relating to thrombosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187468
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Nov 7;99(45):4469-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-7-2002
Author
Ola Björgell
Helle Kieler
Karin Hedenmalm
Stefan Rosfors
Paul Blomqvist
Ingemar Persson
Author Affiliation
Röntgendiagnostiska avdelningen, Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmö. ola.bjorgell@rontgen.mas.lu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Nov 7;99(45):4469-71
Date
Nov-7-2002
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Phlebography - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Radiology Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Ultrasonography, Doppler - statistics & numerical data
Venous Thrombosis - diagnosis - radiography - ultrasonography
Abstract
A questionnaire revealed that nearly 40 000 examinations of clinically suspected deep venous thrombosis (DVT) were performed in Sweden in 2001, with a slight predominance of phlebographies. In about two thirds of all cases the deep muscle veins of the calf were included in the interpretation when phlebography was performed, but in less than one fifth when Doppler sonography (CDU) was used. In more than half of the cases a negative CDU was not followed by phlebograghy. On the other hand, the combination of CDU and phlebography was routinely used in nearly two thirds of all ambiguous cases. The interpretation of nonfiling of contrast medium in vein segments on phlebography varied from DVT to no DVT. Most of the phlebographies were performed with digital X-ray technique.
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2002 Nov 21;99(47):477412523059
PubMed ID
12469524 View in PubMed
Less detail

An economic analysis of teleradiology versus a visiting radiologist service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68991
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 1996;2(3):136-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
T S Bergmo
Author Affiliation
Department of Telemedicine, University Hospital of Tromsø, Norway. tmatsb@rito.no
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 1996;2(3):136-42
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Efficiency, Organizational
Health Care Costs
Humans
Norway
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - economics
Radiology Department, Hospital - economics
Teleradiology - economics
Workload
Abstract
An economic analysis of the teleradiology service provided by a university hospital to a local hospital without radiologists was carried out. The average workload at the local hospital was 6000 patients (8000 examinations) per year. In these circumstances teleradiology cost NKr108 per patient, in comparison with NKr178 per patient for the visiting radiologist service which had previously been provided. The total cost of the teleradiology service amounted to NKr646,900 per year; in comparison the visiting radiologist service cost NKr1,069,000 per year. Calculations showed that for teleradiology to be cheaper, the workload had to exceed 1576 patients per year. A sensitivity analysis showed that assuming a shorter equipment lifetime, for instance four years rather than six years, made the threshold value 2320 patients per year instead of 1576.
PubMed ID
9375047 View in PubMed
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[An efficient department of radiology is a key to good diagnosis of venous thrombosis. However indications for insertion of vena cava filters are not yet certain].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187469
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Nov 7;99(45):4454-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-7-2002
Author
Hans Johnsson
Author Affiliation
Akutkliniken, Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm. hans.johnsson@ks.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Nov 7;99(45):4454-7
Date
Nov-7-2002
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Efficiency, Organizational
Humans
Physician's Practice Patterns
Questionnaires
Radiology Department, Hospital - organization & administration - standards
Sweden
Vena Cava Filters - standards
Venous Thrombosis - radiography - therapy
PubMed ID
12469521 View in PubMed
Less detail

[An iron fist in silk gloves. Interview by Per lund].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103134
Source
J Sykepleien. 1990 Feb 22;78(3):18-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-22-1990

Availability, indications, and technical performance of computed tomographic colonography: a national survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169790
Source
Acta Radiol. 2006 Apr;47(3):231-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
V. Fisichella
M. Hellström
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. valeria.fisichella@vgregion.se
Source
Acta Radiol. 2006 Apr;47(3):231-7
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colonic Diseases - radiography
Colonography, Computed Tomographic - statistics & numerical data - trends
Diffusion of Innovation
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Patient Selection
Radiology Department, Hospital
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Abstract
To determine the availability, indications, and technique of computed tomographic colonography (CTC) in Sweden and to investigate opinions on its future role in colon imaging.
In May 2004, a questionnaire on CTC was mailed to all Departments of Radiology in Sweden, and one year later a telephone interview was conducted with the departments that intended to start a CTC service.
Ninety-nine departments (83%) answered the questionnaire, indicating that 23/ 99 (23.2%) offered a CTC service. Reasons for non-implementation of CTC were lack of CTC training in 34/73 (46.6%) and non-availability of multi-detector row CT scanners in 33/73 (45.2%), while 26% were awaiting further scientific documentation on CTC. Incomplete colonoscopy was the main indication for CTC in 21/23 (91.3%) departments performing CTC. Dual positioning, room air insufflation, and thin-slice collimation were used in all the responding departments. The number of CTC studies performed varied from 1-5 (26.1%) to more than 200 (17.4%). Intravenous contrast material was routinely administered by 9/23 (39.1%) departments. Out of 30 (39.5%) departments that in 2004 intended to start CTC, 9 (30%) had done so by June 2005. A total of 32/99 (32.3%) departments had therefore started CTC by June 2005. Half of the departments that replied believed that CTC would absolutely or probably replace barium enema in the future.
The survey shows relatively limited diffusion of CTC practice in Sweden, with approximately one-third of radiology departments offering a CTC service, mostly on a small scale. A wider dissemination of CTC requires further scientific documentation of its capability, intensified educational efforts, and additional funding.
PubMed ID
16613302 View in PubMed
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Average radiation exposure values for three diagnostic radiographic examinations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228125
Source
Radiology. 1990 Nov;177(2):341-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1990
Author
F G Rueter
B J Conway
J L McCrohan
O H Suleiman
Author Affiliation
Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, MD 20857.
Source
Radiology. 1990 Nov;177(2):341-5
Date
Nov-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Exposure
Health Facilities, Proprietary
Humans
Lumbar vertebrae - radiography
Radiation Dosage
Radiography
Radiography, Abdominal
Radiography, Thoracic
Radiology Department, Hospital
Sacrum - radiography
Sweden
United States
Abstract
National surveys of more than 600 facilities that performed chest, lumbosacral spine, and abdominal examinations were conducted as a part of the Nationwide Evaluation of X-Ray Trends program. Radiation exposures were measured with use of a set of standard phantoms developed by the Center for Devices and Radiological Health of the Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Public Health Service. X-ray equipment parameters, film processing data, and data regarding techniques used were collected. There were no differences in overall posteroanterior chest exposures between hospitals and private practices. Seventy-six percent of hospitals used grids, compared with 33% of private practices. In general, hospitals favored a high tube voltage technique, and private facilities favored a low tube voltage technique. Forty-one percent of private practices and 17% of hospitals underprocessed their film. Underprocessing in hospitals increased from 17% in 1984 to 33% in 1987. Average exposure values for these examinations may be useful as guidelines in meeting some of the new requirements of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations.
PubMed ID
2217766 View in PubMed
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112 records – page 1 of 12.