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126 records – page 1 of 13.

A 5-year follow-up of occlusal status and radiographic findings in mandibular condyles of the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187416
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 2002 Nov-Dec;15(6):539-43
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kaija Hiltunen
Miira M Vehkalahti
Jaakko S Peltola
Anja Ainamo
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Finland. kaija.hiltunen@helsinki.fi
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 2002 Nov-Dec;15(6):539-43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Dentition
Denture, Partial, Fixed
Dentures
Dislocations - classification - radiography
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - classification - rehabilitation
Logistic Models
Male
Mandibular Condyle - radiography
Odds Ratio
Osteoarthritis - classification - radiography
Osteosclerosis - classification - radiography
Radiography, Panoramic
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - classification - radiography
Abstract
The aim of the present 5-year follow-up was to clarify the nature of occlusal support status and radiographic changes in condyles of the elderly, and the association between these two variables.
The present study is part of a comprehensive medical survey of a random sample born in 1904, 1909, and 1914. A total of 364 subjects living in Helsinki participated in the dental part of the examination during 1990 to 1991, and after 5 years a total of 103 were reexamined. Comprehensive data on occlusal support status were available for 94 subjects, and radiographic data were available for 88 subjects. Occlusal support status was assessed on the basis of the Eichner index, radiographic changes were assessed from panoramic radiographs, and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders were assessed using Helkimo's anamnestic index.
The most frequent radiographic finding in the mandibular joint was flattening of the articular surface of the condyle associated with osteoarthrosis, found at baseline in 17% and during follow-up in 13% of the subjects. During the 5-year follow-up, Eichner index for natural dentition remained unaltered in 94% of the subjects and in 85% of the subjects when removable dentures were included. There were no radiographic changes in 92% of the cases. No differences based on age or gender were found. A logistic regression model revealed associations between the selected baseline factors. The odds ratio for baseline Helkimo's anamnestic index was 4.1, 5.7 for Eichner index with the support of removable dentures, and 356 for radiographic findings.
Radiographic changes in condyles of elderly people were small during the 5-year follow-up, but baseline radiographic findings, Helkimo's anamnestic index, and Eichner index with removable dentures were risk factors for radiographic findings at the end of the follow-up.
PubMed ID
12475158 View in PubMed
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A 5-year follow-up of signs and symptoms of TMD and radiographic findings in the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182090
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 2003 Nov-Dec;16(6):631-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kaija Hiltunen
Jaakko S Peltola
Miira M Vehkalahti
Timo Närhi
Anja Ainamo
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Finland. kaija.hiltunen@helsinki.fi
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 2003 Nov-Dec;16(6):631-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mandibular Condyle - physiopathology - radiography
Radiography, Panoramic
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Sex Factors
Temporomandibular Joint - physiopathology - radiography
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - classification - physiopathology - radiography
Abstract
The aim was to clarify the associations among subjective symptoms, clinical signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and radiographic findings in the mandibular condyles of elderly people during a 5-year follow-up.
As part of a comprehensive medical survey of a random sample born in 1904, 1909, and 1914 (Helsinki Aging Study), 364 subjects living in Helsinki participated in the dental part of the examination during 1990 and 1991; after 5 years, 103 of these were reexamined. Comprehensive data on TMD were available for 94 subjects, and radiographic data were available for 88. TMD were assessed by Helkimo's anamnestic and clinical indices, and radiographic status was assessed by panoramic radiographs.
During the 5-year follow-up, reported anamnestic symptoms of TMD for men changed little (9%); among women, the change from baseline was 42%. When the unchanged indices were compared, the gender difference was obvious. At baseline, 5% of the women, but no men, had severe signs (clinical index III) of TMD. At the end of follow-up, none showed severe signs. Comparison of radiographic findings between baseline and follow-up showed no differences, nor did differences appear in associations between radiographic findings and anamnestic or clinical indices.
During the 5-year follow-up, signs and symptoms of TMD in these elderly individuals became milder or vanished. The radiographic status of the condyles remained stable, and no association appeared between radiographic findings and signs and symptoms of TMD.
PubMed ID
14714843 View in PubMed
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A 24-year follow-up of root filled teeth and periapical health amongst middle aged and elderly women in Göteborg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70741
Source
Int Endod J. 2005 Apr;38(4):246-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
F. Frisk
M. Hakeberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Endodontology/Oral Diagnosis, Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. fredrik.frisk@lio.se
Source
Int Endod J. 2005 Apr;38(4):246-54
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Periapical Periodontitis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Radiography, Panoramic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Tooth, Nonvital - epidemiology
Abstract
AIM: To describe the endodontic status amongst middle-aged and elderly women longitudinally and cross-sectionally over 24 years. METHODOLOGY: A random sample of 1462 women 38, 46, 50, 54 and 60 years old, living in Göteborg, Sweden, were sampled in 1968 for medical and dental examinations with a participation rate of 90.1%. The same women were re-examined in 1980 and 1992 together with new 38- and 50-year-old women. The dental examination consisted of questionnaires, clinical and panoramic radiological survey (OPG). The number of teeth, number of root filled teeth (RF) and number of teeth with periapical radiolucencies (PA) were registered. The RF and PA ratios were calculated. Cross-sectional data were analysed by means of anova and longitudinal data by a general linear model for repeated measures. Sample prevalences were compared and statistical inferences were made with the chi-squared test. In all analysis, the confidence interval (CI) regarded mean difference between groups (95% CI). RESULTS: The RF and PA ratio decreased over time as well as the frequency of edentulous subjects. Cross-sectional analysis revealed a minor increase in frequency of RF and PA and loss of teeth with age. Longitudinally, loss of teeth was evident in all cohorts. In addition, there was a trend of lower number of teeth with PA, and the RF ratio increased with age. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of periapical disease did not increase with age, probably as a result of root canal treatment and extractions. Data showed that the prevalence of RF teeth and teeth with PA decreased for comparable age cohorts during the 24-year follow-up.
PubMed ID
15810975 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of clinical and radiological classification of the jawbone anatomy for implantation--a survey of 374 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181217
Source
J Oral Implantol. 2004;30(1):30-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Gintaras Juodzbalys
Aune M Raustia
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kaunas University of Medicine, Vainiku 12, LT-3018 Kaunas, Lithuania.
Source
J Oral Implantol. 2004;30(1):30-9
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alveolar Process - pathology - radiography
Atrophy
Cephalometry - instrumentation
Dental Arch - pathology - radiography
Dental Implantation, Endosseous
Dental Implants
Female
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous - classification - pathology - radiography
Male
Mandible - pathology - radiography
Maxilla - pathology - radiography
Middle Aged
Patient Care Planning
Radiography, Panoramic
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the anatomical features of edentulous jaw dental segments (eJDS) in order to offer the most reliable clinical and radiological classification of such segments in planning for implant treatment. A total of 374 patients, 156 men and 218 women, participated in the investigation. The mean age of the patients was 46 years (SD 12.7), ranging between 17 and 73 years. The eJDS were estimated by means of orthopantomogram, computerized tomography, and intraorally with special ridge-mapping callipers for measurement of alveolar process width. A total of 792 screw-shaped and 1-stage Osteofix Dental Implant System (Oulu, Finland) implants were inserted. Dental segments were divided according to the results of the commonly accepted eJDS assessments into 3 clinical-anatomical types. Type I indicated insignificant or no atrophy of eJDS (232 patients with 476 implant sites; 60.1% of the total number). Type II indicated mild to moderate vertical or horizontal atrophy of eJDS (100 patients with 222 sites; 28% of the total number). Type III indicated significant vertical or horizontal atrophy of eJDS (42 patients with 94 sites; 11.9% of the total number). The accuracy of the clinical and radiological classification was adjudged to have been 95.8%. By the process of establishing clinical and radiological classification of the jawbone segments, more reliability was anticipated regarding the insertion of implants both in maxillae and mandibles.
PubMed ID
15008452 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of the Third Molar Eruption Predictor in predicting eruption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194372
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 2001 Jun;91(6):638-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
I. Ventä
S. Schou
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland. irja.venta@helsinki.fi
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 2001 Jun;91(6):638-42
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bayes Theorem
Calibration
Denmark
False Negative Reactions
False Positive Reactions
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting - methods
Humans
Male
Molar - radiography
Molar, Third - physiology - radiography
Observer Variation
Odontometry
Probability
Radiography, Panoramic
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Tooth Crown - radiography
Tooth Eruption
Tooth, Impacted - physiopathology
Tooth, Unerupted - physiopathology - radiography
Abstract
To evaluate the possibility of applying the Third Molar Eruption Predictor to all panoramic radiographs.
Panoramic radiographs were retrospectively analyzed from a 4-year follow-up study of third molars carried out at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. The radiographs, taken at a mean age of 20.6 years, included 45 unerupted or partially erupted mandibular third molars in 28 subjects. Because the device was calibrated both with simple proportions and by use of the methods of Bayes' Decision Theory, the separation point of the device was therefore adjusted at 12 mm from the distal surface of the second molar.
The predictions of future eruption or impaction made with the calibrated device and the actual clinical outcome 4 years later were in conformity for 80% of the mandibular third molars.
The Third Molar Eruption Predictor may be applied to all panoramic radiographs, but it seems to require calibration before use.
PubMed ID
11402274 View in PubMed
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Age estimation based on tooth development: a test of reliability and validity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37072
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1991 Aug;99(4):281-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1991
Author
V. Staaf
H. Mörnstad
U. Welander
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Radiology, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1991 Aug;99(4):281-6
Date
Aug-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Determination by Teeth
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Odontogenesis - physiology
Radiography, Panoramic
Reproducibility of Results
Sex Factors
Sweden
Tooth - physiology
Tooth Root - physiology
Abstract
The precision and accuracy of three commonly used methods for age determination by teeth were studied in 541 children aged 5.5-14.5 yr. These methods rely on estimation of tooth development as seen in radiographs compared with compiled dental charts. It was found that charts made from Scandinavian populations gave a rather good precision, while one from a Canadian population gave a consistent overestimate. Dependent on the method used, sex, and age, the 95% confidence interval for an individual prediction could be more than +/- 2 yr.
PubMed ID
1771373 View in PubMed
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Age estimation by dental developmental stages in children and adolescents in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276359
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2015 Dec;257:518.e1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Sigridur Rosa Vidisdottir
Svend Richter
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2015 Dec;257:518.e1-7
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Determination by Teeth - methods
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases, Factual
Female
Humans
Iceland
Male
Radiography, Panoramic
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Sex Characteristics
Tooth - growth & development - radiography
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies have shown that it is necessary to create a database for dental maturity for every population and compare it to others. The present study is the first one for dental development in the Icelandic population the age range being 4-24 years. It will help in forensic dental age estimation and will also help dentists, physicians, anthropologists, archaeologists and other professionals who rely on developmental age assessment in children and adolescents. In this present retrospective cross-sectional study, dental maturity was determined in 1100 Icelandic children and adolescents from orthopantomograms (OPGs). The first 100 were used for a pilot study and the remaining 1000 for the main study. A total of 23 subjects were excluded. The sample consisted of 508 girls and 469 boys from the age of 4-24 years and a dental developmental scoring system was used as a standard for determination of dental maturity stages. A total of 200 OPGs were studied both on the left and right side and the remaining on the right side. Dental maturity was established for all teeth and both genders, when the sample permitted, from the beginning of crown formation to the root apex closure. The Cronbach's Alpha reliability test showed high reliability, R=0.982. Girls in Iceland reach dental maturity root completed (stage 10, Rc) at 17.81 years of age for the maxillary and at 18.47 years for the mandibular teeth. Boys reach dental maturity root completed (stage 10, Rc) at 18.00 years of age in the maxilla and 17.63 in the mandible. There was no significant difference between left and right side (r=0.95-1.00) and there was no gender difference, except in root formation in maxillary and mandibular canines where girls reached root completed earlier than boys. A reliable database has been established in Iceland for tooth development in the age range of 4-24 years, which is compatible with international studies. These results will help forensic odontologists and other professionals to estimate with high accuracy both age and dental maturity in Icelandic children and adolescents.
PubMed ID
26481347 View in PubMed
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[A longitudinal radiographic-clinical study of supernumerary and aplastic teeth in 415 school children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40742
Source
Tandlaegebladet. 1981 May;85(8):245-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1981

Alveolar bone loss in relation to toll-like receptor 4 and 9 genotypes and Porphyromonas gingivalis carriage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280208
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2016 Nov;35(11):1871-1876
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
U K Gursoy
Q. He
P. Pussinen
S. Huumonen
E. Könönen
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2016 Nov;35(11):1871-1876
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alveolar Bone Loss - diagnostic imaging - genetics
Bacteroidaceae Infections - complications - microbiology
Female
Finland
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Periodontitis - complications - microbiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Porphyromonas gingivalis - immunology - isolation & purification
Radiography, Panoramic
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Toll-Like Receptor 4 - genetics
Toll-Like Receptor 9 - genetics
Abstract
Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are highly developed sensors to detect microbe-associated molecular patterns. Functional polymorphisms of the genes TLR4 and TLR9 were found to be associated with alveolar bone loss in a Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced periodontitis model in mice. Our aim was to examine whether such an association can be detected in a group of Finnish adults. Polymorphisms of TLR4 Asp299Gly (rs4986790) and TLR9 rs187084 (1486 T/C) were genotyped by pyrosequencing and PCR from the saliva samples of 223 adults (age range 40-60 years). Alveolar bone loss, measured from panoramic radiographs, were compared between TLR genotype groups according to subjects' salivary carriage of P. gingivalis, measured using a single copy gene-based real-time PCR. The frequencies of TLR4 wild type and heterozygote variants were 87.4 % and 12.6 %, respectively, while those of TLR9 wild type, heterozygote, and homozygote variants were 25.6 %, 39.1 %, and 35.3 %, respectively. In the TLR4 heterozygote group, P. gingivalis-positive subjects had more alveolar bone loss than P. gingivalis-negative subjects (p?=?0.027), while no difference was observed in the wild type group. P. gingivalis-negative individuals with TLR9 heterozygotes exhibited significantly less alveolar bone loss compared to those with TLR9 wild type (p?=?0.007). Polymorphisms of TLR4 in P. gingivalis carriers seem to expose to alveolar bone loss. Polymorphisms of TLR9 can be protective against alveolar bone loss in the absence of P. gingivalis.
PubMed ID
27492306 View in PubMed
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An orthopantomographic study of developmental mandibular bone defects (Stafne's idiopathic bone cavities).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254077
Source
Int J Oral Surg. 1974;3(2):71-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1974

126 records – page 1 of 13.