Skip header and navigation

Refine By

59 records – page 1 of 6.

An embolic deflection device for aortic valve interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139209
Source
JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2010 Nov;3(11):1133-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Fabian Nietlispach
Namal Wijesinghe
Ronen Gurvitch
Edgar Tay
Jeffrey P Carpenter
Carol Burns
David A Wood
John G Webb
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2010 Nov;3(11):1133-8
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve Stenosis - physiopathology - therapy
Blood pressure
British Columbia
Cardiac Catheterization - adverse effects - instrumentation - methods
Catheterization
Embolic Protection Devices
Feasibility Studies
Female
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - instrumentation - methods
Humans
Intracranial Embolism - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Prosthesis Design
Radial Artery
Radiography, Interventional
Stroke - etiology - prevention & control
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We describe initial human experience with a novel cerebral embolic protection device.
Cerebral emboli are the major cause of procedural stroke during percutaneous aortic valve interventions.
With right radial artery access, the embolic protection device is advanced into the aortic arch. Once deployed a porous membrane shields the brachiocephalic trunk and the left carotid artery deflecting emboli away from the cerebral circulation. Embolic material is not contained or removed by the device. The device was used in 4 patients (mean age 90 years) with severe aortic stenosis undergoing aortic balloon valvuloplasty (n = 1) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (n = 3).
Correct placement of the embolic protection device was achieved without difficulty in all patients. Continuous brachiocephalic and aortic pressure monitoring documented equal pressures without evidence of obstruction to cerebral perfusion. Additional procedural time due to the use of the device was 13 min (interquartile range: 12 to 16 min). There were no procedural complications. Pre-discharge cerebral magnetic resonance imaging found no new defects in any of 3 patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation and a new 5-mm acute cortical infarct in 1 asymptomatic patient after balloon valvuloplasty alone. No patient developed new neurological symptoms or clinical findings of stroke.
Embolic protection during transcatheter aortic valve intervention seems feasible and might have the potential to reduce the risk of cerebral embolism and stroke.
Notes
Comment In: JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2010 Nov;3(11):1139-4021087749
PubMed ID
21087748 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of effective dose and dose to the lens of the eye for the interventional cardiologist.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153883
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2008;132(3):313-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Øydis Østbye Lie
Gudrun Uthaug Paulsen
Tor Wøhni
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Postboks, Østerås, Norway. oydis.ostbye.lie@radiumhospitalet
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2008;132(3):313-8
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Cardiology - methods
Coronary Angiography
Fluoroscopy
Humans
Lens, Crystalline - radiation effects
Norway
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries
Radiation Protection - methods
Radiography, Interventional - methods - statistics & numerical data
Thermoluminescent Dosimetry - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study investigates the relationship between personal dosemeter (PD) reading, effective dose and dose to the lens of the eye for interventional cardiologists in Norway. Doses were recorded with thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD-100) for 14 cardiologists, and the effective doses were estimated using the Niklason algorithm. The procedures performed were coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention, and all the hospitals (eight) in Norway, which are performing these procedures, were included in the study. Effective dose per unit dose-area product varied by a factor of 5, and effective dose relative to PD reading varied between 4 and 39%. Eye lens doses ranged from 39 to 138% of the dosemeter reading. On the basis of an estimated annual workload of 900 procedures, the annual effective doses ranged from 1 to 11 mSv. The estimated annual doses to the unprotected eye ranged from 9 to 210 mSv. According to the ICRP dose limits, the results indicate that the eye could be the limiting organ.
PubMed ID
19056809 View in PubMed
Less detail

Catheter-based closure of atrial septal defects in the oval fossa with the Amplatzer device in patients in their first or second year of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150865
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2009 Jun 1;73(7):949-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2009
Author
G. Fischer
B. Smevik
H H Kramer
P G Bjørnstad
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany. fischer@pedcard.uni-kiel.de
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2009 Jun 1;73(7):949-55
Date
Jun-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiac Catheterization - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Child
Child, Preschool
Equipment Design
Feasibility Studies
Female
Germany
Heart Septal Defects, Atrial - mortality - therapy - ultrasonography
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway
Patient Selection
Radiography, Interventional
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To assess feasibility, safety, and efficacy of the use of Amplatzer occluders in closure of atrial septal defects (ASD) in children in the first 2 years of life.
Although scattered reports on such closure have been published, no agreement consists on the policy.
In 654 patients of all ages, closure was achieved in 632 (96.6%). Data were analyzed retrospectively in all 71 children where an attempt had been made to close the ASD before their second birthday.
Median age and body weight were 17.2 months (range 3.9-23.8) and 10.0 kg (range 3.8-14.5), respectively. Median fluoroscopy time was 13.6 min and median device size 15 mm. Successful closure was achieved in 68 children (95.8%). Three times the procedure was aborted: in one, the device repeatedly straddled the septum; in the other two, a small left atrium restricted the movement of the left-sided disc. One device embolized and was reimplanted after retrieval. One infant with multiple disorders died 6 days after closure from acute sepsis probably unrelated to the procedure. No other complications occurred. Only trivial shunts closing with time were registered during follow-up. Symptomatic patients profited markedly from closure.
The results and complications of ASD closure with the Amplatzer device in patients in their first 2 years of life compare favorably with procedures in older patients, provided that the size of the septum and the dimensions in the left atrium are taken into consideration when selecting the size of the device.
PubMed ID
19455678 View in PubMed
Less detail

Catheter-based flow measurements in hemodialysis fistulas - bench testing and clinical performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133234
Source
J Vasc Access. 2012 Jan-Mar;13(1):45-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
Søren T Heerwagen
Lars Lönn
Torben V Schroeder
Søren D Ladefoged
Marc A Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Interventional Radiology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. soeren.heerwagen@rh.regionh.dk
Source
J Vasc Access. 2012 Jan-Mar;13(1):45-50
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arteriovenous Shunt, Surgical - adverse effects
Blood Flow Velocity
Catheters
Constriction, Pathologic
Denmark
Endovascular Procedures
Equipment Design
Flowmeters
Graft Occlusion, Vascular - etiology - physiopathology - therapy
Hemodynamics
Hemorheology
Humans
Materials Testing
Observer Variation
Predictive value of tests
Radiography, Interventional
Regional Blood Flow
Regression Analysis
Renal Dialysis
Reproducibility of Results
Rheology - instrumentation
Thermodilution
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to perform bench and clinical testing of a catheter-based intravascular system capable of measuring blood flow in hemodialysis vascular accesses during endovascular procedures.
We tested the Transonic ReoCath Flow Catheter System which uses the thermodilution method. A simulated vascular access model was constructed for the bench test. In total, 1960 measurements were conducted and the results were used to determine the accuracy and precision of the catheters, the effects of external factors (e.g., catheter placement, injection duration), and to test for systematic bias. In the clinical study, two interventional radiologists conducted a total of 250 measurements in 14 patients with arteriovenous fistulas to determine clinical precision and enable testing for bias between measurers.
Accuracy was excellent for both catheters with a high level of agreement between results from the ReoCath Flow Catheter System and the reference flowmeter. Clinical precision, expressed as the mean coefficient of variation, was 5.9% and 4.7% for the antegrade and retrograde catheters, respectively. Flow measurements were significantly affected by the distance between a stenosis and the tip of a retrograde catheter with the effect being proportional to the degree of stenosis. There was no systematic bias between measurers.
The Reocath Flow Catheter System was found to be accurate and precise. Reliable results require careful attention to catheter placement. Blood flow measurements provide unique information on the hemodynamic status of a vascular access and have the potential to optimize results of interventions.
PubMed ID
21725955 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of interventional cardiology in two European countries: a nationwide Internet based registry study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118194
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Sep 30;168(2):1237-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-2013
Author
T. Gudnason
G S Gudnadottir
B. Lagerqvist
K. Eyjolfsson
T. Nilsson
G. Thorgeirsson
K. Andersen
S. James
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Landspitali University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; Cardiovascular Research Institute of Landspitali and the University of Iceland, Iceland; University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. Electronic address: thorgudn@landspitali.is.
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Sep 30;168(2):1237-42
Date
Sep-30-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiology - methods - standards
Coronary Angiography - methods - standards
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Internet - standards
Male
Middle Aged
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - methods - standards
Prospective Studies
Radiography, Interventional - methods - standards
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The practice of interventional cardiology differs between countries and regions. In this study we report the results of the first nation-wide long-term comparison of interventional cardiology in two countries using a common web-based registry.
The Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry (SCAAR) was used to prospectively and continuously collect background-, quality-, and outcome parameters for all coronary angiographies (CA) and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) performed in Iceland and Sweden during one year.
The rate of CA per million inhabitants was higher in Iceland than in Sweden. A higher proportion of patients had CA for stable angina in Iceland than in Sweden, while the opposite was true for ST elevation myocardial infarction. Left main stem stenosis was more commonly found in Iceland than in Sweden. The PCI rate was similar in the two countries as was the general success rate of PCI, achievement of complete revascularisation and the overall stent use. Drug eluting stents were more commonly used in Iceland (23% vs. 19%). The use of fractional flow reserve (0.2% vs. 10%) and the radial approach (0.6% vs. 33%) was more frequent in Sweden than in Iceland. Serious complications and death were very rare in both countries.
By prospectively comparing interventional cardiology in two countries, using a common web based registry online, we have discovered important differences in technique and indications. A discovery such as this can lead to a change in clinical practice and inspire prospective multinational randomised registry trials in unselected, real world populations.
PubMed ID
23232456 View in PubMed
Less detail

CONTEMPORARY RADIATION DOSES IN INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY: A NATIONWIDE STUDY OF PATIENT DOSES IN FINLAND.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309571
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2019 Dec 31; 185(4):483-493
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-31-2019
Author
Jukka Järvinen
Joanna Sierpowska
Teemu Siiskonen
Hannu Järvinen
Tuomas Kiviniemi
Tuomas T Rissanen
Hanna Matikka
Eini Niskanen
Saija Hurme
Heli R S Larjava
Timo J Mäkelä
Satu Strengell
Markku Eskola
Teuvo Parviainen
Elina Hallinen
Markku Pirinen
Antti Kivelä
Mika Teräs
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Turku Heart Centre, Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2019 Dec 31; 185(4):483-493
Date
Dec-31-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aortic Valve - surgery
Atrioventricular Node - pathology
Cardiology - methods - standards
Coronary Angiography
Electrophysiology
Female
Finland
Fluoroscopy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Radiation Dosage
Radiography, Interventional - methods
Radiology, Interventional - methods - standards
Radiometry
Reference Values
Tachycardia - pathology
Abstract
The amount of interventional procedures such as percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), pacemaker implantation (PI) and ablations has increased within the previous decade. Simultaneously, novel fluoroscopy mainframes enable lower radiation doses for patients and operators. Therefore, there is a need to update the existing diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) and propose new ones for common or recently introduced procedures. We sought to assess patient radiation doses in interventional cardiology in a large sample from seven hospitals across Finland between 2014 and 2016. Data were used to set updated national DRLs for coronary angiographies (kerma-air product (KAP) 30 Gycm2) and PCIs (KAP 75 cm2), and novel levels for PIs (KAP 3.5 Gycm2), atrial fibrillation ablation procedures (KAP 25 Gycm2) and TAVI (KAP 90 Gycm2). Tentative KAP values were set for implantations of cardiac resynchronization therapy devices (CRT, KAP 22 Gycm2), electrophysiological treatment of atrioventricular nodal re-entry tachycardia (6 Gycm2) and atrial flutter procedures (KAP 16 Gycm2). The values for TAVI and CRT device implantation are published for the first time on national level. Dose from image acquisition (cine) constitutes the major part of the total dose in coronary and atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. For TAVI, patient weight is a good predictor of patient dose.
PubMed ID
30989216 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coronary angioplasty and cancer risk: a population-based cohort study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17218
Source
Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol. 2005 Jan-Feb;28(1):36-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Lambe
P. Hall
F. Granath
O. Sadr Azodi
T. Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, P.O. Box 281, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. mats.lambe@meb.ki.se
Source
Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol. 2005 Jan-Feb;28(1):36-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Radiography, Interventional - adverse effects
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) has become the reperfusion method of choice in patients with coronary artery disease. This sometimes complicated and lengthy procedure is performed using fluoroscopy and cineradiography or digital imaging, which may result in considerable exposure to ionizing radiation. Possible cancer risks in PTCA patients have been discussed, but never before examined in a population-based setting. OBJECTIVE: To assess the cancer risks following PTCA. METHODS: A cohort study was carried out based on nationwide registration of all coronary angioplasty procedures in Sweden between 1989 and 1998. The study encompassed a total of 23,097 PTCA patients followed up for cancer outcomes in the Swedish Cancer Register until December 31, 2000. The mean and median follow-up times were 4.8 and 4.5 years, respectively. The main outcome measures were standardized incidence ratios of cancer. RESULTS: Except for a transient excess of lung cancers, observed number of cancers in patients who had undergone coronary angioplasty did not differ from those expected in the general population. If anything, the overall cancer risk was lower in the PTCA group (SIR 0.94; 95% CI 0.88-0.99). In particular, no increased risks were detected for leukemias or thyroid cancer. CONCLUSION: There was no indication of increased risks of leukemia or cancers overall in PTCA patients.
PubMed ID
15696350 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cost-effectiveness analysis of implantable venous access device insertion using interventional radiologic versus conventional operating room methods in pediatric patients with cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144624
Source
J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2010 May;21(5):677-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Rebecca Hancock-Howard
Bairbre L Connolly
Meghan McMahon
Anita Menon
Gloria Woo
Paul W Wales
Albert Aziza
Audrey Laporte
Eric Nauenberg
Wendy J Ungar
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2010 May;21(5):677-84
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Catheterization, Central Venous - economics - methods
Child
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Neoplasms - economics - epidemiology - surgery
Operating Rooms - economics
Prevalence
Radiography, Interventional - economics
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Percutaneous image-guided techniques are associated with less tissue trauma and morbidity than open surgical techniques. Interventional radiology has received significant health care investment. The purpose was to determine the cost effectiveness of inserting implantable venous access devices (IVADs) by interventional radiologic means versus conventional operating room surgery in pediatric patients with cancer.
In a retrospective cohort analysis, patients presenting with a new tumor diagnosis and receiving a first-time IVAD in January to June 2000 (operative group; n = 30) and January to June 2004 (interventional group; n = 30) were included. A societal costing perspective was adopted. Costs included labor, materials, equipment, inpatient wards, parent travel, and parental productivity losses for 30 days after insertion. Severe complications related to IVAD insertion were microcosted. Costs related to cancer therapy were not included. Incremental cost-effectiveness analysis and sensitivity analysis were performed.
Interventional patients were older (7.3 years vs 4.1 years; P = .01). There were no significant differences between groups in sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, or length of hospital stay. Interventional radiologic procedures were shorter (84.9 minutes vs 112.8 minutes; P = 0.01). Interventional radiologic insertion was slightly less costly than operative insertion (Can$622,860 and Can$627,005 per 30-patient group, respectively) and more effective in reducing the complication rate (two vs eight complications per group, respectively; P = .039). The results were sensitive to the cost of operating the operating room.
Interventional radiology was slightly less costly than operative IVAD insertion and resulted in fewer serious complications. It should be considered for IVAD insertions in pediatric patients with cancer.
PubMed ID
20347335 View in PubMed
Less detail

The current status of interventional radiology in Canada: results of a survey by the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194764
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 2001 Apr;52(2):87-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
S F Millward
M L Holley
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, Victoria Campus, 375 South St., London, ON N6A 4G5. sfmillward@home.com
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 2001 Apr;52(2):87-91
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection
Humans
Radiography, Interventional - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Abstract
To evaluate the current status of interventional radiology in Canada.
A questionnaire was sent to 28 Canadian interventional radiologists (defined as a physician who performs any type of interventional procedure, including biopsies, but excluding interventional neuroradiology) practising in both tertiary and community hospitals in the major centres in all provinces except Prince Edward Island.
Twenty-two (79%) of 28 surveys were completed and returned, providing data about 86 interventional radiologists (IRs). IRs were performing almost all of the following procedures at their institutions: inferior vena cava filter placement, venous angioplasty, dialysis fistula angioplasty, diagnostic and therapeutic pulmonary and bronchial artery procedures, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures of the lower extremity and renal arteries, percutaneous abscess and biliary drainage procedures, percutaneous nephrostomy, and fibroid embolization. A second group of procedures, performed by both IRs and non-radiologists in most institutions, included: all types of central venous catheter placements, pleural drainage, and gastrostomy tube placement. Procedures not being performed by anyone in a number of institutions included: dialysis graft thrombolysis, varicocele embolization, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts, palliative stenting of the gastrointestinal tract, fallopian tube recannalization, and liver and prostate tumour treatments. The factors most often limiting the respondents' ability to provide a comprehensive interventional service were the interventional radiology inventory budget and the availability of interventional radiology rooms; 50% of respondents indicated the number of available nurses, technologists and IRs was also an important limiting factor.
IRs in Canada still play a major role in many of the most commonly performed procedures. However, limited availability of resources and personnel in many institutions may be hampering the ability of IRs to develop new procedures.
Notes
Comment In: Can Assoc Radiol J. 2001 Apr;52(2):85-611339150
PubMed ID
11339151 View in PubMed
Less detail

Description and assessment of a common reference method for fluoroscopic and transesophageal echocardiographic localization and guidance of mitral periprosthetic transcatheter leak reduction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137751
Source
JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Jan;4(1):107-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Haïfa Mahjoub
Stéphane Noble
Réda Ibrahim
Jeannot Potvin
Eileen O'Meara
Annie Dore
François Marcotte
Jacques Crépeau
Raoul Bonan
Asmaa Mansour
Denis Bouchard
Anique Ducharme
Arsène J Basmadjian
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Montreal Heart Institute/Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Jan;4(1):107-14
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiac Catheterization
Echocardiography, Doppler, Color - standards
Echocardiography, Transesophageal - standards
Female
Fluoroscopy - standards
Heart Valve Prosthesis
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - instrumentation
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mitral Valve - radiography - ultrasonography
Mitral Valve Insufficiency - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Observer Variation
Predictive value of tests
Prosthesis Failure
Quebec
Radiography, Interventional - standards
Reference Standards
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Ultrasonography, Interventional - standards
Abstract
This study sought to describe and compare a novel fluoroscopic method and a 2-dimensional transesophageal echocardiographic (TEE) method to localize mitral periprosthetic leaks (PPLs) for transcatheter reduction.
Transcatheter reduction of significant regurgitation represents a modern and attractive alternative to surgery for the treatment of mitral PPL in high-risk patients. Accurate localization and precise communication between the echocardiographer and the interventional cardiologist are essential for procedural success.
We analyzed TEE and fluoroscopic studies of patients with mitral PPL who underwent multiplane 2-dimensional TEE-guided transcatheter reduction in our institution. Periprosthetic leaks were routinely localized using the "surgeon's-view" time-clock method during periprocedural TEE assessments. The 2-dimensional TEE examinations were later retrospectively reviewed by an echocardiographer blinded to procedural TEE findings. A corresponding surgeon's-view time-clock method was plotted for fluoroscopic PPL localization. Using this fluoroscopic method, offline fluoroscopic images were reviewed by an independent interventional cardiologist blinded to TEE results. Agreement between methods was evaluated.
Complete imaging data were available for analysis in 20 patients who, between 2002 and 2009, underwent transcatheter reduction in which the defect was successfully crossed. There was excellent agreement between procedural TEE and retrospective TEE review for PPL localization (100%; p
PubMed ID
21251637 View in PubMed
Less detail

59 records – page 1 of 6.