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152 records – page 1 of 16.

A 5-year retrospective analysis of employer-provided dental care for Finnish male industrial workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206874
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
J. Ahlberg
R. Tuominen
H. Murtomaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. jari.ahlberg@helsinki.fi
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Dental Association
DMF Index
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Prophylaxis
Dental Records
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dentures
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Finland - epidemiology
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Patient Education as Topic
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Radiography, Dental
Retrospective Studies
Root Canal Therapy
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
The treatment-mix, treatment time, and dental status of 268 male industrial workers entitled to employer-provided dental care were studied. The data were collected from treatment records of the covered workers over the 5-year period 1989-93. Treatment time was based on clinical treatment time recorded per patient visit, and the treatment procedure codes were reclassified into a treatment-mix according to American Dental Association categories, with a modification combining endodontics and restorative treatment. The mean number of check-ups followed by prescribed treatment (treatment courses) during the 5 years was 3.7 among those who had entered the in-house dental care program prior to the monitored period (old attenders). Their treatment time was stable, 57-63 min per year, while the first-year mean treatment time (170 min) of those who had entered the program during the study period (new attenders) was significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
9429814 View in PubMed
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A 10-year follow-up study of fixed metal ceramic prosthodontics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75777
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 1997 Oct;24(10):713-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
R. Näpänkangas
M A Salonen
A M Raustia
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry and Stomatognathic Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 1997 Oct;24(10):713-7
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cementation
Ceramics
Crowns
Dental Abutments
Dental Porcelain
Dental Prosthesis Design
Denture Design
Denture, Partial, Fixed
Esthetics, Dental
Evaluation Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - etiology
Gingival Pocket - etiology
Humans
Male
Metal Ceramic Alloys
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Patient satisfaction
Post and Core Technique
Radiography, Dental
Retrospective Studies
Students, Dental
Surface Properties
Zinc Phosphate Cement
Abstract
The aim of this retrospective study was to record patients' satisfaction with fixed metal ceramic bridges and crowns made by dental students and to evaluate the functioning and condition of the bridges and crowns clinically and radiologically. Out of the 60 patients treated at the Institute of Dentistry during 1984-85, 30 patients attended the follow-up examination (16 women, mean age 39, range 23-62 years and 14 men, mean age 44, range 26-65 years). The anamnestic data and data regarding treatment procedures were collected from the patient files. The patients had been supplied with 41 crowns and 24 bridges (mean 3.9 units, range 3-6 units), which included 61 abutments and 33 pontics or cantilever extensions (abutment/pontic ratio 1.85: 1). Marginal fidelity was unsatisfactory in 13% of the crowns and bridges and gingival bleeding and pockets of 4-6 mm were noted in 27% and 12% of cases, respectively. None of the subjects had caries in the abutments.
PubMed ID
9372460 View in PubMed
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Accuracy among dentists experienced in forensic odontology in establishing identity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219799
Source
J Forensic Odontostomatol. 1993 Dec;11(2):45-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
G. Ekstrom
T. Johnsson
H. Borrman
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Odontology, University of Goteborg, Sweden.
Source
J Forensic Odontostomatol. 1993 Dec;11(2):45-52
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dentists
Expert Testimony
Forensic Dentistry - standards
Humans
Observer Variation
Professional Competence
Radiography, Dental
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of 17 forensic odontologists identifying individuals from two sets of radiographs, one regarded as ante- and the other as postmortem. Each case was observed twice and only one pair out of 31 did not match. The observers were asked to comment about each case, classifying it as easy, moderate or difficult. The results show that one observer was totally correct in the first analysis while four observers made no errors the second time. In the first evaluation 14 observers made between one and seven errors and two observers made 11 errors each. In the second evaluation 12 observers made between one and seven errors and one observer made 13 errors. At the first evaluation, the observers judged 18 of the cases as easy, eight as medium and five as difficult. At the second evaluation, the observers pronounced 13 of the cases as easy, 13 as medium and five as difficult. The corresponding values for the authors were 6, 12 and 13. Most of the mistakes were made on the cases with no restorations and the incorrect answers were found mostly among the difficult cases. In practical forensic work however additional dental chart information is usually available to the forensic odontologist.
PubMed ID
8040212 View in PubMed
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Accuracy and precision in some dental radiographic methods. A methodological study with special considerations in age estimation in juveniles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35526
Source
Swed Dent J Suppl. 1995;104:1-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
L. Kullman
Source
Swed Dent J Suppl. 1995;104:1-38
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Determination by Skeleton
Age Determination by Teeth
Alveolar Bone Loss - radiography
Child
Dental Caries - radiography
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Female
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Male
Molar, Third - radiography
Odontometry
Radiographic Image Enhancement - methods
Radiography, Dental
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Tooth Root - radiography
Abstract
A computer method enabling metric measuring in radiographs has been presented. The measurements are time saving and precise and accurate measurements can be made. The statistical analysis can be performed based on a ratio scale, allowing more reliable and conclusive statistics. The most useful field for the presented method is offered in epidemiology where great materials are being handled. Since small changes can be studied, the method can be useful in studying marginal bone level changes in large populations. Or marginal bone levels around implants. In age estimation the digitizer method has no direct valuable application during adolescence, when the lower third molar is used. Here the present series of studies showed the traditional age estimation method and the digitizer method to be fairly unprecise with rather large systematic error. The skeletal age estimation method according to Greulich and Pyle was found to be more accurate and useful during the ages 14 up to 18 years. In younger children, where more parameters or teeth are available, there may be advantages to use a digital dental method instead of a traditional dental one.
PubMed ID
7660316 View in PubMed
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Analysis of dentists' attitudes towards risks in oral radiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52746
Source
Dentomaxillofac Radiol. 1996 Jun;25(3):151-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
B. Svenson
B. Söderfeldt
H G Gröndahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Radiology, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Orebro, Sweden.
Source
Dentomaxillofac Radiol. 1996 Jun;25(3):151-6
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dentist's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
General Practice, Dental
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Radiation Protection
Radiography, Dental - utilization
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To develop a method of measuring dentists' attitudes towards radiation hazards and to describe their prevalence among Swedish general dental practitioners. METHODS: A questionnaire was mailed to 2000 randomly selected dentists listed in the register of the Swedish Dental Society, with a response rate of 69.3%. An index for measurements of attitudes towards radiation hazards was constructed. RESULTS: Those dentists who showed high concern at radiation hazards also restricted their use of X-ray examinations. Years in practice and attendance at extended (one-week) courses in oral radiology both had significant associations with risk attitude. Inexperienced dentists showed less concern for radiation hazards compared with those more experienced and were less scrupulous in their choice of radiographic procedures. Gender, working alone, in the public dental health services or in private practice had no significant association with attitude. Dentists who considered regulations laid down by the Swedish National Institute of Radiation Protection as wholly adequate had a high care attitude. CONCLUSIONS: It is possible to study the relationship between attitudes and clinical behaviour by postal survey. Experience and continuing education affect dentists' attitudes towards risk and these attitudes in turn influence their clinical behaviour.
PubMed ID
9084264 View in PubMed
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[An examination of dental X-ray units in 1988-1990].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227504
Source
Tannlaeknabladid. 1991;9(1):32-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
G. Einarsson
T. Walderhaug
Source
Tannlaeknabladid. 1991;9(1):32-4
Date
1991
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Iceland
Radiation Dosage
Radiography, Dental - instrumentation
PubMed ID
1817594 View in PubMed
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An inventory of United States and Canadian growth record sets: preliminary report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220916
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 1993 Jun;103(6):545-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
W S Hunter
S. Baumrind
R E Moyers
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, London.
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 1993 Jun;103(6):545-55
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Archives
Canada
Cephalometry
Child
Child, Preschool
Cleft palate
Dental Models
Dental Records
Directories as Topic
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Maxillofacial Development
Radiography, Dental
Radiology Information Systems
United States
Abstract
A listing and description of longitudinal craniofacial growth record sets currently extant on the North American continent is provided. An argument is made for the preservation of these resources and for the generation of a pooled or shared image base of duplicate craniofacial physical records. This is a preliminary report and is assumed to be incomplete. In an effort to improve our accuracy and completeness, we invite corrections and additions.
PubMed ID
8506817 View in PubMed
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Approximal caries increment in adolescents after a visual aid in combination with a comprehensive open discussion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121529
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 May-Jul;71(3-4):676-82
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anita Häggblom
Aron Naimi-Akbar
Agneta Lith
Lena Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Division of Dental Biomaterials and Cariology, Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 May-Jul;71(3-4):676-82
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Audiovisual Aids
Case-Control Studies
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Humans
Radiography, Dental
Sweden
Abstract
To achieve greater motivation for behavioural changes; educating, motivating and supporting the patient's ability to change lifestyle factors related to the caries disease are important tasks in the prevention of the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a visual aid (Visual Caries Dialogue, VCD) in combination with a comprehensive open discussion has a beneficial effect on approximal caries development among a population of young adolescents.
The study subjects were randomized to either an intervention group (n = 118), where VCD was conducted, or a control group (n = 112) receiving traditional oral healthcare information, at the annual dental health examination. The number of caries lesions reaching through the entire enamel (D2) and dentin caries reaching through the enamel into the dentin (D3) were recorded from bitewing radiographs each year, from 2001-2004. Differences between the study groups regarding at least two new approximal surfaces with caries (D2-D3) were tested using logistic regression.
The caries increment was lower in the intervention group compared to the control group. During the 3-year follow-up, 18 (15.3%) patients in the intervention group and 40 (35.7%) patients in the control group demonstrated a DS-approximal increment of at least two surfaces with a risk ratio of 2.34 (95% CI = 1.43-3.83).
Visual Caries Dialogue in combination with a comprehensive open discussion reduced approximal caries increment among young individuals. The method provides an innovative simple and low-cost way of delivering information to patients and guides busy dental healthcare personnel in the approach.
PubMed ID
22900665 View in PubMed
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152 records – page 1 of 16.