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3D simulation as a tool for improving the safety culture during remediation work at Andreeva Bay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265458
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2014 Dec;34(4):755-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
K. Chizhov
M K Sneve
I. Szoke
I. Mazur
N K Mark
I. Kudrin
N. Shandala
A. Simakov
G M Smith
A. Krasnoschekov
A. Kosnikov
I. Kemsky
V. Kryuchkov
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2014 Dec;34(4):755-73
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decontamination - methods
Hazardous Waste Sites
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Models, organizational
Norway
Organizational Culture
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radiation Protection - methods
Radioactive Waste - prevention & control
Russia
Safety Management - organization & administration
Abstract
Andreeva Bay in northwest Russia hosts one of the former coastal technical bases of the Northern Fleet. Currently, this base is designated as the Andreeva Bay branch of Northwest Center for Radioactive Waste Management (SevRAO) and is a site of temporary storage (STS) for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and other radiological waste generated during the operation and decommissioning of nuclear submarines and ships. According to an integrated expert evaluation, this site is the most dangerous nuclear facility in northwest Russia. Environmental rehabilitation of the site is currently in progress and is supported by strong international collaboration. This paper describes how the optimization principle (ALARA) has been adopted during the planning of remediation work at the Andreeva Bay STS and how Russian-Norwegian collaboration greatly contributed to ensuring the development and maintenance of a high level safety culture during this process. More specifically, this paper describes how integration of a system, specifically designed for improving the radiological safety of workers during the remediation work at Andreeva Bay, was developed in Russia. It also outlines the 3D radiological simulation and virtual reality based systems developed in Norway that have greatly facilitated effective implementation of the ALARA principle, through supporting radiological characterisation, work planning and optimization, decision making, communication between teams and with the authorities and training of field operators.
PubMed ID
25254659 View in PubMed
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Advances in NORM management in Norway and the application of ICRP's 2007 recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119562
Source
Ann ICRP. 2012 Oct-Dec;41(3-4):332-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Liland
P. Strand
I. Amundsen
H. Natvig
M. Nilsen
R. Lystad
K E Frogg
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, P.O. Box 55, No-1332 Osteras, Norway. astrid.liland@nrpa.no
Source
Ann ICRP. 2012 Oct-Dec;41(3-4):332-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemical Industry
Environmental Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Extraction and Processing Industry
Government Regulation
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
International Agencies
Norway
Oil and Gas Fields
Radiation Protection - standards
Radioactive Waste - prevention & control
Waste Management - standards
Abstract
In Norway, the largest reported quantities of radioactive discharges and radioactive waste containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) come from the oil and gas sector, and smaller quantities of other NORM waste are also produced by industrial or mining processes. The Gulen final repository for radioactive waste from the oil and gas industry from the Norwegian continental shelf was opened in 2008 and has a capacity of 6000 tonnes. As of 1 January 2011, a new regulation was enforced whereby radioactive waste and radioactive pollution was integrated in the Pollution Control Act from 1981. This means that radioactive waste and radioactive pollution are now regulated under the same legal framework as all other pollutants and hazardous wastes. The regulation establishes two sets of criteria defining radioactive waste: a lower value for when waste is considered to be radioactive waste, and a higher value, in most cases, for when this waste must be disposed of in a final waste repository. For example, waste containing = 1 Bq/g of Ra-226 is defined as radioactive waste, while radioactive waste containing = 10 Bq/g of Ra-226 must be disposed of in a final repository. Radioactive waste between 1 and 10B q/g can be handled and disposed of by waste companies who have a licence for handling hazardous waste according to the Pollution Control Act. Alternatively, they will need a separate licence for handling radioactive waste from the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority. The goal of the new regulation is that all radioactive waste should be handled and stored in a safe manner, and discharges should be controlled through a licensing regime in order to avoid/not pose unnecessary risk to humans or the environment. This paper will elaborate on the new regulation of radioactive waste and the principles of NORM management in Norway in view of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's 2007 Recommendations.
PubMed ID
23089033 View in PubMed
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A biosphere assessment of high-level radioactive waste disposal in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268794
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2015 Apr;164(1-2):103-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Ulrik Kautsky
Tobias Lindborg
Jack Valentin
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2015 Apr;164(1-2):103-7
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer simulation
Ecosystem
Models, Theoretical
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radiation Protection - methods
Radioactive Waste - prevention & control
Safety Management - methods
Sweden
Waste Disposal Facilities
Waste Management - methods
Abstract
Licence applications to build a repository for the disposal of Swedish spent nuclear fuel have been lodged, underpinned by myriad reports and several broader reviews. This paper sketches out the technical and administrative aspects and highlights a recent review of the biosphere effects of a potential release from the repository. A comprehensive database and an understanding of major fluxes and pools of water and organic matter in the landscape let one envisage the future by looking at older parts of the site. Thus, today's biosphere is used as a natural analogue of possible future landscapes. It is concluded that the planned repository can meet the safety criteria and will have no detectable radiological impact on plants and animals. This paper also briefly describes biosphere work undertaken after the review. The multidisciplinary approach used is relevant in a much wider context and may prove beneficial across many environmental contexts.
PubMed ID
25431486 View in PubMed
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[Ecological estimation of a condition of protective barriers of storage at long-term localization of radioactive waste].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150971
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2009;(3):4-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
E I Veselov
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2009;(3):4-7
Date
2009
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decontamination - standards
Humans
Nuclear Reactors - standards
Radiation Monitoring - standards
Radiation Protection - standards
Radioactive Waste - prevention & control
Russia
Safety Management - standards
Time Factors
Waste Management - standards
Abstract
Data on change of a condition of natural and artificial protective barriers during long-term storage of the Russian Open Society in storehouses (see text) type are resulted.
PubMed ID
19441700 View in PubMed
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Independent regulatory examination of radiation situation in the areas of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive wastes storage in the Russian far east.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135276
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2011 Jul;146(1-3):129-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
N K Shandala
S M Kiselev
A I Lucyanec
A V Titov
V A Seregin
D V Isaev
S V Akhromeev
Author Affiliation
Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Centre, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2011 Jul;146(1-3):129-32
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Cobalt Radioisotopes - analysis
Gamma Rays
Government Regulation
Humans
Industrial Waste - prevention & control
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Monitoring - legislation & jurisprudence
Radiation Protection - legislation & jurisprudence
Radioactive Waste - prevention & control
Russia
Safety Management - legislation & jurisprudence
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis
Waste Management - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
This paper describes the findings of the radiation situation analysis on-site near Sysoeva and Razbojnik Bays. The results of radiation monitoring performed by radiological laboratory of DalRAO and studies performed by the experts from the Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Centre have been used in the course of analysis. On the industrial sites, gamma dose rate reaches 60 µSv h(-1), and the specific activities of man-made radionuclides in soil reach 2.5 × 10(4) Bq kg(-1) for (137)Cs, 7.6 × 10(3) Bq kg(-1) for (90)Sr and 2.0 × 10(3) Bq kg(-1) for (60)Co. Beyond the industrial sites, there are three local parts of the area on the coast and in the off-shore water area, contaminated with man-made radionuclides. Gamma dose rate reaches 8 µSv h(-1). The radionuclide contents in soil at this area reach 3.6 × 10(3), 2.8 × 10(3) and 19 Bq kg(-1) for (137)?s, (90)Sr and (60)??, respectively. At the remaining part of the area nearby Sysoeva Bay, the radiation situation complies with natural background.
PubMed ID
21493600 View in PubMed
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Medical and radiological aspects of emergency preparedness and response at SevRAO facilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154077
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2008 Dec;28(4):499-509
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
M N Savkin
M K Sneve
M I Grachev
G P Frolov
S M Shinkarev
A. Jaworska
Author Affiliation
Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Centre, Moscow, Russian Federation.
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2008 Dec;28(4):499-509
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Civil Defense - legislation & jurisprudence
Emergency Medical Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Government Regulation
Humans
Industrial Waste - prevention & control
Nuclear Reactors - legislation & jurisprudence
Radiation Monitoring - legislation & jurisprudence
Radiation Protection - legislation & jurisprudence
Radioactive Waste - prevention & control
Russia
Safety Management - legislation & jurisprudence
Waste Management - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
Regulatory cooperation between the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority and the Federal Medical Biological Agency (FMBA) of the Russian Federation has the overall goal of promoting improvements in radiation protection in Northwest Russia. One of the projects in this programme has the objectives to review and improve the existing medical emergency preparedness capabilities at the sites for temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste. These are operated by SevRAO at Andreeva Bay and in Gremikha village on the Kola Peninsula. The work is also intended to provide a better basis for regulation of emergency response and medical emergency preparedness at similar facilities elsewhere in Russia. The purpose of this paper is to present the main results of that project, implemented by the Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Centre. The first task was an analysis of the regulatory requirements and the current state of preparedness for medical emergency response at the SevRAO facilities. Although Russian regulatory documents are mostly consistent with international recommendations, some distinctions lead to numerical differences in operational intervention criteria under otherwise similar conditions. Radiological threats relating to possible accidents, and related gaps in the regulation of SevRAO facilities, were also identified. As part of the project, a special exercise on emergency medical response on-site at Andreeva Bay was prepared and carried out, and recommendations were proposed after the exercise. Following fruitful dialogue among regulators, designers and operators, special regulatory guidance has been issued by FMBA to account for the specific and unusual features of the SevRAO facilities. Detailed sections relate to the prevention of accidents, and emergency preparedness and response, supplementing the basic Russian regulatory requirements. Overall it is concluded that (a) the provision of medical and sanitary components of emergency response at SevRAO facilities is a priority task within the general system of emergency preparedness; (b) there is an effective and improving interaction between SevRAO and the local medical institutions of FMBA and other territorial medical units; (c) the infrastructure of emergency response at SevRAO facilities has been created and operates within the framework of Russian legal and normative requirements. Further proposals have been made aimed at increasing the effectiveness of the available system of emergency preparedness and response, and to promote interagency cooperation.
PubMed ID
19029584 View in PubMed
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[RADIATION HYGIENIC MONITORING AT THE AREA OF THE LOCATION OF THE FAR EASTERN CENTER FOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT (FEC "DALRAO"--BRANCH OF FSUE "ROSRAO")].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268679
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Sep-Oct;94(5):49-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
S M Kiselev
N K Shandala
S V Akhromeev
T I Gimadova
V A Seregin
A V Titov
N G Biryukova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Sep-Oct;94(5):49-52
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Hazardous Waste Sites - standards
Hygiene - standards
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radiation Protection - methods - standards
Radioactive Waste - prevention & control
Radioisotopes - analysis
Russia
Safety Management - organization & administration
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
Intensification ofactivities in the field of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and radioactive waste (RW) management in the Far East region of Russia assumes an increase of the environmental load on the territories adjacent to the enterprise and settlements. To ensure radiation safety during works on SNF and radioactive waste management in the standard mode of operation and during the rehabilitation works in the contaminated territories, there is need for the optimization of the existing system of radiation-hygienic monitoring, aimed at the implementation of complex dynamic observation of parameters of radiation-hygienic situation and radiation amount of the population living in the vicinity of the Far Eastern Center for Radioactive Waste Management (FEC "DALRAO"). To solve this problem there is required a significant amount of total and enough structured information on the character of the formation of the radiation situation, the potential ways of the spread of man-made pollution to the surrounding area, determining the radiation load on the population living in the vicinity of the object. In this paper there are presented the results of field studies of the radiation situation at the plant FEC "DALRAO", which were obtained during the course of expedition trips in 2009-2012.
PubMed ID
26625616 View in PubMed
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[RADIATION SAFETY DURING REMEDIATION OF THE "SEVRAO" FACILITIES].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268687
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Sep-Oct;94(5):10-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
N K Shandala
S M Kiselev
A V Titov
A V Simakov
V A Seregin
V P Kryuchkov
L S Bogdanova
M I Grachev
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Sep-Oct;94(5):10-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decontamination - methods
Hazardous Waste Sites
Industrial Waste - prevention & control
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radiation Protection - methods
Radioactive Waste - prevention & control
Russia
Safety Management - organization & administration
Abstract
Within a framework of national program on elimination of nuclear legacy, State Corporation "Rosatom" is working on rehabilitation at the temporary waste storage facility at Andreeva Bay (Northwest Center for radioactive waste "SEVRAO"--the branch of "RosRAO"), located in the North-West of Russia. In the article there is presented an analysis of the current state of supervision for radiation safety of personnel and population in the context of readiness of the regulator to the implementation of an effective oversight of radiation safety in the process of radiation-hazardous work. Presented in the article results of radiation-hygienic monitoring are an informative indicator of the effectiveness of realized rehabilitation measures and characterize the radiation environment in the surveillance zone as a normal, without the tendency to its deterioration.
PubMed ID
26625607 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.