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Analysis of EPR and FISH studies of radiation doses in persons who lived in the upper reaches of the Techa River.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275435
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 2015 Nov;54(4):433-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
M O Degteva
N B Shagina
E A Shishkina
A V Vozilova
A Y Volchkova
M I Vorobiova
A. Wieser
P. Fattibene
S. Della Monaca
E. Ainsbury
J. Moquet
L R Anspaugh
B A Napier
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 2015 Nov;54(4):433-44
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption, Radiation
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Assay
Dental Enamel - chemistry
Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy
Female
Humans
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Male
Muscle, Skeletal - chemistry
Radiation Exposure - analysis
Radiation monitoring
Radioactive Hazard Release
Radioactive Waste - analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Russia
Sensitivity and specificity
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Whole-Body Counting
Abstract
Waterborne radioactive releases into the Techa River from the Mayak Production Association in Russia during 1949-1956 resulted in significant doses to about 30,000 persons who lived in downstream settlements. The residents were exposed to internal and external radiation. Two methods for reconstruction of the external dose are considered in this paper, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of teeth, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) measurements of chromosome translocations in circulating lymphocytes. The main issue in the application of the EPR and FISH methods for reconstruction of the external dose for the Techa Riverside residents was strontium radioisotopes incorporated in teeth and bones that act as a source of confounding local exposures. In order to estimate and subtract doses from incorporated (89,90)Sr, the EPR and FISH assays were supported by measurements of (90)Sr-body burdens and estimates of (90)Sr concentrations in dental tissues by the luminescence method. The resulting dose estimates derived from EPR to FISH measurements for residents of the upper Techa River were found to be consistent: The mean values vary from 510 to 550 mGy for the villages located close to the site of radioactive release to 130-160 mGy for the more distant villages. The upper bound of individual estimates for both methods is equal to 2.2-2.3 Gy. The EPR- and FISH-based dose estimates were compared with the doses calculated for the donors using the most recent Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS). The TRDS external dose assessments are based on the data on contamination of the Techa River floodplain, simulation of air kerma above the contaminated soil, age-dependent lifestyles and individual residence histories. For correct comparison, TRDS-based doses were calculated from two sources: external exposure from the contaminated environment and internal exposure from (137)Cs incorporated in donors' soft tissues. It is shown here that the TRDS-based absorbed doses in tooth enamel and muscle are in agreement with EPR- and FISH-based estimates within uncertainty bounds. Basically, this agreement between the estimates has confirmed the validity of external doses calculated with the TRDS.
PubMed ID
26205380 View in PubMed
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Analysis of solid cancer mortality in the techa river cohort using the two-step clonal expansion model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159144
Source
Radiat Res. 2008 Feb;169(2):138-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
M. Eidemüller
E. Ostroumova
L. Krestinina
A. Akleyev
P. Jacob
Author Affiliation
GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany. markus.eidemueller@gsf.de
Source
Radiat Res. 2008 Feb;169(2):138-48
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Computer simulation
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Radioactive Waste - analysis
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Rivers
Russia - epidemiology
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
In this study the solid cancer mortality data in the Techa River Cohort in the Southern Urals region of Russia was analyzed. The cohort received protracted exposure in the 1950s due to the releases of radioactive materials from the Mayak plutonium complex. The Extended Techa River Cohort includes 29,849 people who resided along the Techa River between 1950 and 1960 and were followed from January 1, 1950 through December 31, 1999. The analysis was done within the framework of the biologically based two-stage clonal expansion (TSCE) model. It was found that about 2.6% of the 1854 solid cancer deaths (excluding 18 bone cancer cases) could be related to radiation exposure. At age 63, which is the mean age for solid cancer deaths, the excess relative risk (ERR) and excess absolute risk (EAR) were found to be 0.76 Gy(-1) (95% CI 0.23; 1.29) and 33.0 (10(4) PY Gy)(-1) (95% CI 9.8; 52.6), respectively. These risk estimates are consistent with earlier excess relative risk analyses for the same cohort. The change in the ERR with age was investigated in detail, and an increase in risk with attained age was observed. Furthermore, the data were tested for possible signs of genomic instability, and it was found that the data could be described equally well by a model incorporating effects of genomic instability. Results from the TSCE models indicated that radiation received at older ages might have stronger biological effects than exposure at younger ages.
PubMed ID
18220471 View in PubMed
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Assessment of doses to the offspring of the Techa River cohort due to intakes of radionuclides by the mother.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183429
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2003;105(1-4):609-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
M O Degteva
E I Tolstykh
M I Vorobiova
Author Affiliation
Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Medgorodok, 454076, Chelyabinsk, Russia. marina@urcrm.chel.su
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2003;105(1-4):609-14
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Burden
Bone Marrow - embryology - metabolism
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Cohort Studies
Computer simulation
Female
Fetus - metabolism
Fresh Water - analysis
Humans
Maternal Exposure
Maternal-Fetal Exchange - physiology
Models, Biological
Pregnancy
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive Waste - analysis
Radioisotopes - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Radiometry - methods - standards
Russia
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Tissue Distribution
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Abstract
The Techa River was contaminated as a result of radioactive releases by the Mayak plutonium production facility in 1949-1956. The residents of riverside communities were exposed to internal irradiation from radionuclides ingested mainly with river water, and also to external gamma irradiation resulting from shoreline and flood-plain contamination. The most important role in population exposure was played by (89,90)Sr and 137Cs. The persons born after the onset of the contamination have been identified as the 'Techa River Offspring Cohort' (TROC). The TROC has the potential to provide direct data on health effects in progeny that resulted from exposure of a general population to chronic radiation. This report describes the results of the calculation of fetal doses due to intakes of radionuclides by their mothers. Particular attention has been given to fetal dose from 90Sr because this nuclide is the most significant in terms of population dose for the Techa River. The comparison of the fetal bone marrow doses evaluated using different approaches proposed in the literature has shown a large dispersal in dose values. The main cause of this is the difference in model assumptions simplifying some developmental aspects of fetal haematopoiesis and bone formation. This paper presents an analysis of these basic assumptions that could be useful for further improvements in fetal dosimetry.
PubMed ID
14527035 View in PubMed
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Characterization of 14C in Swedish light water reactors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156097
Source
Health Phys. 2008 Aug;95 Suppl 2:S110-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Asa Magnusson
Per-Olof Aronsson
Klas Lundgren
Kristina Stenström
Author Affiliation
Department of Physics, Division of Nuclear Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden. asa.magnusson@vattenfall.com
Source
Health Phys. 2008 Aug;95 Suppl 2:S110-21
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Carbon Radioisotopes - analysis
Humans
Nuclear Reactors
Power Plants
Pressure
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive Waste - analysis
Safety
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
This paper presents the results of a 4-y investigation of 14C in different waste streams of both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Due to the potential impact of 14C on human health, minimizing waste and releases from the nuclear power industry is of considerable interest. The experimental data and conclusions may be implemented to select appropriate waste management strategies and practices at reactor units and disposal facilities. Organic and inorganic 14C in spent ion exchange resins, process water systems, ejector off-gas and replaced steam generator tubes were analyzed using a recently developed extraction method. Separate analysis of the chemical species is of importance in order to model and predict the fate of 14C within process systems as well as in dose calculations for disposal facilities. By combining the results of this investigation with newly calculated production rates, mass balance assessments were made of the 14C originating from production in the coolant. Of the 14C formed in the coolant of BWRs, 0.6-0.8% was found to be accumulated in the ion exchange resins (core-specific production rate in the coolant of a 2,500 MWth BWR calculated to be 580 GBq GW(e)(-1) y(-1)). The corresponding value for PWRs was 6-10% (production rate in a 2,775 MWth PWR calculated to be 350 GBq GW(e)(-1) y(-1)). The 14C released with liquid discharges was found to be insignificant, constituting less than 0.5% of the production in the coolant. The stack releases, routinely measured at the power plants, were found to correspond to 60-155% of the calculated coolant production, with large variations between the BWR units.
PubMed ID
18617793 View in PubMed
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Characterization of biocenoses in the storage reservoirs of liquid radioactive wastes of Mayak PA. Initial descriptive report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276203
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Jan;151 Pt 2:449-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
E A Pryakhin
Yu G Mokrov
G A Tryapitsina
I A Ivanov
D I Osipov
N I Atamanyuk
L V Deryabina
I A Shaposhnikova
E A Shishkina
N A Obvintseva
E A Egoreichenkov
E V Styazhkina
O F Osipova
N I Mogilnikova
S S Andreev
O V Tarasov
S A Geras'kin
A V Trapeznikov
A V Akleyev
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Jan;151 Pt 2:449-60
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biota
Fresh Water - analysis
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Radioactive Waste - analysis
Radioisotopes - analysis - metabolism
Russia
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
As a result of operation of the Mayak Production Association (Mayak PA), Chelyabinsk Oblast, Russia, an enterprise for production and separation of weapon-grade plutonium in the Soviet Union, ecosystems of a number of water bodies have been radioactively contaminated. The article presents information about the current state of ecosystems of 6 special industrial storage reservoirs of liquid radioactive waste from Mayak PA: reservoirs R-3, R-4, R-9, R-10, R-11 and R-17. At present the excess of the radionuclide content in the water of the studied reservoirs and comparison reservoirs (Shershnyovskoye and Beloyarskoye reservoirs) is 9 orders of magnitude for (90)Sr and (137)Cs, and 6 orders of magnitude for alpha-emitting radionuclides. According to the level of radioactive contamination, the reservoirs of the Mayak PA could be arranged in the ascending order as follows: R-11, R-10, R-4, R-3, R-17 and R-9. In 2007-2012 research of the status of the biocenoses of these reservoirs in terms of phytoplankton, zooplankton, bacterioplankton, zoobenthos, aquatic plants, ichthyofauna, avifauna parameters was performed. The conducted studies revealed decrease in species diversity in reservoirs with the highest levels of radioactive and chemical contamination. This article is an initial descriptive report on the status of the biocenoses of radioactively contaminated reservoirs of the Mayak PA, and is the first article in a series of publications devoted to the studies of the reaction of biocenoses of the fresh-water reservoirs of the Mayak PA to a combination of natural and man-made factors, including chronic radiation exposure.
PubMed ID
26094572 View in PubMed
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Determination of natural and depleted uranium in urine at the ppt level: an interlaboratory analytical exercise.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169856
Source
Health Phys. 2006 May;90(5):494-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
E A Ough
B J Lewis
W S Andrews
L G I Bennett
R G V Hancock
P A D'Agastino
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, 11 General Crerar Crescent, Kingston, ON, Canada. edough@telus.net
Source
Health Phys. 2006 May;90(5):494-9
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Laboratories - statistics & numerical data
Microchemistry - methods
Military Personnel
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive Waste - analysis
Radiometry - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Uranium - urine
Urinalysis - methods
Abstract
An analytical exercise was initiated in order to determine those procedures with the capability to measure total uranium and uranium (238U/235U) isotopic ratios in urine samples containing >0.02 microg U kg-1 urine. A host laboratory prepared six identical sets of twelve synthetic urine samples containing total uranium in the range of 25 to 770 ng U kg-1 urine and with 238U/235U isotopic ratios ranging from 138 (100% NU) to 215 (51% DU). Sets of samples were shipped to five testing laboratories (four based in Canada and one based in Europe). Each laboratory utilized one of the following analytical techniques: sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-SF-MS), quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-Q-MS), thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), and instrumental/delayed neutron activation analysis (I/DNAA), in their analyses.
PubMed ID
16607181 View in PubMed
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Distribution and sources of (129)I in rivers of the Baltic region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82664
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2006;88(1):49-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Aldahan A.
Kekli A.
Possnert G.
Author Affiliation
Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Villav. 16, SE-752 36 Uppsala, Sweden. ala.aldahan@geo.uu.se
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2006;88(1):49-73
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Baltic States
Environmental monitoring
Finland
Geography
Germany
Iodine Radioisotopes - analysis
Poland
Radioactive Waste - analysis
Rivers - chemistry
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
The concentration of (129)I was measured in 54 river waters discharging into the Baltic Sea from Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and Germany. Sample collection was performed during a well-bracketed time interval (June-July 1999), thus allowing comparison of the rivers over a wide latitude range without the effect of long temporal spread. Although there is no direct input of anthropogenic (129)I in the watersheds, the concentration of the isotope is about two to three orders of magnitude higher than the expected pre-nuclear era natural values in the rivers of Finland and northern Sweden, and in the rivers of southern Sweden, Lithuania, Estonia, Latvia, Poland and Germany; the (129)I concentration may reach five orders of magnitude higher. Furthermore, there are significant correlations between the (129)I concentration and latitude and/or distance from the North Sea and between (129)I and Cl. These findings suggest seawater as a main source of (129)I to the rivers through atmospheric transport. Of the many chemical parameters investigated, the pH may account for some of the variability in (129)I concentrations of the rivers. The contribution from nuclear weapon tests and the Chernobyl accident to the riverine (129)I is insignificant compared to the releases from the nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. The total flux of (129)I by rivers to the Baltic Sea and related basins represents minor amounts of the isotope pool in these marine waters. External radioactivity hazards from (129)I are considered to be negligible in the Baltic region. However, as the main (129)I intake to the human body is likely through water, due to the large amount of daily water consumption, more concern should be given to internal radioactivity hazard that may be associated with the isotope's localized elevated concentration in the human organs.
PubMed ID
16527378 View in PubMed
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Environment and biology of the Kara Sea: a general view for contamination studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75423
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2001 Jan-Jun;43(1-6):19-27
Publication Type
Article
Author
J C Miquel
Author Affiliation
Marine Environmental Laboratory, International Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco. J.C.Miquel@iaea.org
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2001 Jan-Jun;43(1-6):19-27
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Biomass
Birds
Ecosystem
Environmental Exposure
Fisheries
Fishes
Food chain
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Humans
Ice
Mammals
Models, Biological
Oceans and Seas
Plankton - radiation effects
Plants - radiation effects
Radioactive Waste - analysis
Seawater - chemistry
Waste management
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Water Pollution, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
The recent revelation that over the past 30 years there has been a history of dumping waste including high-level radioactive wastes in the shallow Kara Sea has caused wide-spread concern. The potential impact of these contaminants and other non-nuclear pollutants in the Arctic ecosystem and on human health need to be assessed and, thus, a better insight gained on radioecological processes in cold waters. The present paper proposes a general view on the biology and the environment of the Kara Sea, as a basic tool for the experimental and modelling assessments of the impact of these contaminants.
PubMed ID
11601532 View in PubMed
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External dose reconstruction for the former village of Metlino (Techa River, Russia) based on environmental surveys, luminescence measurements, and radiation transport modelling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285361
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 2017 May;56(2):139-159
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
M M Hiller
C. Woda
N G Bougrov
M O Degteva
O. Ivanov
A. Ulanovsky
S. Romanov
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 2017 May;56(2):139-159
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environment
Humans
Luminescent Measurements
Models, Biological
Radioactive Waste - analysis
Radiometry
Rivers
Russia
Surveys and Questionnaires
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
In the first years of its operation, the Mayak Production Association, a facility part of the Soviet nuclear weapons program in the Southern Urals, Russia, discharged large amounts of radioactively contaminated effluent into the nearby Techa River, thus exposing the people living at this river to external and internal radiations. The Techa River Cohort is a cohort intensely studied in epidemiology to investigate the correlation between low-dose radiation and health effects on humans. For the individuals in the cohort, the Techa River Dosimetry System describes the accumulated dose in human organs and tissues. In particular, organ doses from external exposure are derived from estimates of dose rate in air on the Techa River banks which were estimated from measurements and Monte Carlo modelling. Individual doses are calculated in accordance with historical records of individuals' residence histories, observational data of typical lifestyles for different age groups, and age-dependent conversion factors from air kerma to organ dose. The work here describes an experimentally independent assessment of the key input parameter of the dosimetry system, the integral air kerma, for the former village of Metlino, upper Techa River region. The aim of this work was thus to validate the Techa River Dosimetry System for the location of Metlino in an independent approach. Dose reconstruction based on dose measurements in bricks from a church tower and Monte Carlo calculations was used to model the historic air kerma accumulated in the time from 1949 to 1956 at the shoreline of the Techa River in Metlino. Main issues are caused by a change in the landscape after the evacuation of the village in 1956. Based on measurements and published information and data, two separate models for the historic pre-evacuation geometry and for the current geometry of Metlino were created. Using both models, a value for the air kerma was reconstructed, which agrees with that obtained in the Techa River Dosimetry System within a factor of two.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28374124 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.