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129I in the oceans: origins and applications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6779
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1999 Sep 30;237-238:31-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-1999
Author
G M Raisbeck
F. Yiou
Author Affiliation
Centre de Spectrométrie Nucléaire et de Spectrométrie de Masse, IN2P3-CNRS, Orsay, France. raisbeck@csnsm.in2p3.fr
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1999 Sep 30;237-238:31-41
Date
Sep-30-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Monitoring - methods
France
Great Britain
Iodine - analysis
Iodine Radioisotopes - analysis
Oceans and Seas
Radioactive Tracers
Radioactive Waste - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Technetium - analysis
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Water Pollution, Radioactive - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The quantity of the long lived (half-life 15.7 million years) radioactive isotope 129I in the pre-nuclear age ocean was approximately 100 kg. Various nuclear related activities, including weapons testing, nuclear fuel reprocessing, Chernobyl and other authorized or non-authorized dumping of radioactive waste have increased the ocean inventory of 129I by more than one order of magnitude. The most important of these sources are the direct marine discharges from the commercial reprocessing facilities at La Hague (France) and Sellafield (UK) which have discharged approximately 1640 kg in the English Channel, and approximately 720 kg in the Irish Sea, respectively. We discuss how this 129I can be used as both a 'pathway' and 'transit time' tracer in the North Atlantic and Arctic oceans, as well as a parameter for distinguishing between reprocessed and non-reprocessed nuclear waste in the ocean, and as a proxy for the transport and dilution of other soluble pollutants input to the North Sea.
PubMed ID
10568263 View in PubMed
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AKA-TPG: a program for kinetic and epidemiological analysis of data from labeled glucose investigations using the two-pool model and database technology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78693
Source
Diabetes Technol Ther. 2007 Feb;9(1):99-108
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Boston Raymond C
Stefanovski Darko
Henriksen Jan E
Ward Glen M
Moate Peter J
Author Affiliation
School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania 19348, USA. drrayboston@yahoo.com
Source
Diabetes Technol Ther. 2007 Feb;9(1):99-108
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Insulin - blood
Liver - metabolism
Male
Models, Biological
Population Groups
Radioactive Tracers
Software Design
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Two-Pool Glucose (TPG) model has an important role to play in diabetes research since it enables analysis of data obtained from the frequently sampled labeled (hot) glucose tolerance test (FSHGT). TPG modeling allows determination of the separate effects of insulin on the disposal of glucose and on the hepatic production of glucose. It therefore provides a basis for the accurate estimation of glucose effectiveness, insulin sensitivity, and the profile of the rate of endogenous glucose production. Until now, there has been no program available dedicated to the TPG model, and a number of technical reasons have deterred researchers from performing TPG analysis. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this paper, we describe AKA-TPG, a new program that combines automatic kinetic analysis of the TPG model data with database technologies. AKA-TPG enables researchers who have no expertise in modeling to quickly fit the TPG model to individual FSHGT data sets consisting of plasma concentrations of unlabeled glucose, labeled glucose, and insulin. Most importantly, because the entire process is automated, parameters are almost always identified, and parameter estimates are accurate and reproducible. AKA-TPG enables the demographic data of hundreds of individual subjects, their individual unlabeled and labeled glucose and insulin data, and each subject's parameters and indices derived from AKA-TPG to be securely stored in, and retrieved from, a database. We describe how the stratification and population analysis tools in AKA-TPG are used and present population estimates of TPG model parameters for young, healthy (without diabetes) Nordic men. CONCLUSION: Researchers now have a practical tool to enable kinetic and epidemiological analysis of TPG data sets.
PubMed ID
17316104 View in PubMed
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Bengt Långström--personal recollections of the gentle giant of short-lived radiotracers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268263
Source
J Labelled Comp Radiopharm. 2015 Mar;58(3):49-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Robert F Dannals
Source
J Labelled Comp Radiopharm. 2015 Mar;58(3):49-50
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
History, 20th Century
Humans
Radioactive Tracers
Radiochemistry - history
Sweden
PubMed ID
25809709 View in PubMed
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[Identification of low-molecular inhibitors of proteinase ASK1].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101675
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2010 Sep-Oct;82(5):41-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
G P Volynets
V G Bdzhola
O P Kukharenko
S M Iarmoliuk
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2010 Sep-Oct;82(5):41-50
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenosine Triphosphate - metabolism
Apoptosis - drug effects
Binding Sites
Cardiovascular Diseases - drug therapy
Cell Differentiation - drug effects
Cell Line
High-Throughput Screening Assays
Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous - drug therapy
Humans
Inhibitory Concentration 50
MAP Kinase Kinase Kinase 5 - genetics - metabolism
Models, Molecular
Neoplasms - drug therapy
Neurodegenerative Diseases - drug therapy
Phosphorus - analysis - metabolism
Protein Binding
Protein Kinase Inhibitors - chemistry - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship
Radioactive Tracers
Recombinant Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Small Molecule Libraries - chemistry - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Thiazolidinediones - chemistry - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Abstract
Protein kinase ASK1 (Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1) plays a key role in cell differentiation, aging and apoptosis. High activity of the kinase is associated with several pathologies. The ASK1 inhibitors might be therapeutic for patients with neurodegenerative, cardiovascular diseases and fibrous histiocytoma. In this work the identification of ASK1 inhibitors was performed by the methods of computer modeling and biochemical testing in vitro. The virtual screening experiments were carried out targeting the ATP binding site of ASK1 by browsing the database which contained 164 840 compounds of diverse chemical classes. The best-scored 300 ligands have been taken for the kinase assay analysis. In vitro tests revealed that derivatives of 2-thioxo-thiazolidin-4-one exhibited inhibitory activity against ASK1. The most active compound was 5-bromo-3-(4-oxo-2-thioxo-thiazolidin-5-ylidene)-1,3-dihydro-indol-2-one (IC50 = 2 microM). Binding mode for inhibitors of this class with ASK1 ATP-binding site was proposed. Our results can be used for further optimization and developing more potent and selective inhibitors of ASK1.
PubMed ID
21674960 View in PubMed
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Mass balance soil ingestion estimating methods and their application to inhabitants of rural and wilderness areas: a critical review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145092
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2010 Apr 15;408(10):2181-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2010
Author
James R Doyle
Jules M Blais
Paul A White
Author Affiliation
Chemical and Environmental Toxicology Program, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada. jamiedoyle@sympatico.ca
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2010 Apr 15;408(10):2181-8
Date
Apr-15-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Eating
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Feeding Behavior
Humans
Radioactive Tracers
Risk assessment
Rural Population
Soil - analysis
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Wilderness
Abstract
Quantitative soil ingestion studies employing a mass balance tracer approach have been used to provide a defensible means to estimate soil ingestion for human health risk assessments. Past studies have focused on soil ingestion in populations living in urban/suburban environments. There is a paucity of reliable quantitative soil ingestion data to support human health risk assessments of other lifestyles that may be predisposed to ingesting soil, such as agricultural workers or indigenous populations following traditional lifestyles. The results of a preliminary analysis of sampling and analytical variability that would result from assessing activities typical of populations in rural or wilderness areas and conducted over wide areas show that approximately 225 subject days would be required to detect a difference of 20mg/d in soil ingestion. Given the typically small populations in these areas, future soil ingestion studies should be focused on specific activities with a high potential for soil ingestion.
PubMed ID
20199799 View in PubMed
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