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59 records – page 1 of 6.

The 6th Klaas Breur memorial lecture, 1987. The Chernobyl accident--impact Western Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25858
Source
Radiother Oncol. 1988 May;12(1):1-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1988

131I content in the human thyroid estimated from direct measurements of the inhabitants of Russian areas contaminated due to the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30700
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2003;105(1-4):623-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
A A Bratilova
I A Zvonova
M I Balonov
N G Shishkanov
V I Trushin
M. Hoshi
Author Affiliation
Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Mira st. 8, 197136, St Petersburg, Russia. bratilov@comset.net
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2003;105(1-4):623-6
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Computer simulation
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Iodine Radioisotopes - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Male
Metabolic Clearance Rate
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive fallout - analysis
Radiometry - methods
Russia
Thyroid Gland - metabolism
Ukraine
Abstract
The method of processing and the results of measurements of 131I content in the thyroids of Russian people performed in May-June 1986 are presented. The contribution of radiation from Cs radionuclides in the human body was taken into account in the processing of measurement data with an SRP-68-01 device. The greatest individual 131I content was found in the thyroids of inhabitants of the Bryansk region, up to 250-350 kBq, and in the Tula and Orel regions, up to 100 kBq. The average 131I thyroid activity in the middle of May 1986 reached 80 kBq for inhabitants of some settlements in the Bryansk region, 5-8 kBq in the Tula region and 5 kBq in the Orel region.
PubMed ID
14527038 View in PubMed
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137Cs concentrations in lichens before and after the Chernobyl accident

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102073
Source
Health Physics. 1993 Jan;64(1):70-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1993
Author
Hofmann, W
Attarpour, N
Lettner, H
Türk, R
Source
Health Physics. 1993 Jan;64(1):70-73
Date
Jan-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Austria
Cesium Radioisotopes--analysis
Lichens--chemistry
Nuclear Reactors
Radioactive Fallout--analysis
Ukraine
Abstract
137Cs activities were measured in a variety of epigeic and epiphytic lichens in Austria before and after contamination by the Chernobyl fallout. For comparison, the activity of the naturally occurring 40K was also determined in each lichen sample. The high 137Cs activities found after Chernobyl suggest that lichens are suitable and inexpensive biological detectors of the fallout pattern.
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Atmospheric transport of radioactive debris to Norway in case of a hypothetical accident related to the recovery of the Russian submarine K-27.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276214
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Jan;151 Pt 2:404-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Jerzy Bartnicki
Ingar Amundsen
Justin Brown
Ali Hosseini
Øystein Hov
Hilde Haakenstad
Heiko Klein
Ole Christian Lind
Brit Salbu
Cato C Szacinski Wendel
Martin Album Ytre-Eide
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Jan;151 Pt 2:404-16
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Movements
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Norway
Radiation monitoring
Radioactive fallout - analysis
Radioactive Hazard Release
Radioisotopes - analysis
Russia
Ships
Abstract
The Russian nuclear submarine K-27 suffered a loss of coolant accident in 1968 and with nuclear fuel in both reactors it was scuttled in 1981 in the outer part of Stepovogo Bay located on the eastern coast of Novaya Zemlya. The inventory of spent nuclear fuel on board the submarine is of concern because it represents a potential source of radioactive contamination of the Kara Sea and a criticality accident with potential for long-range atmospheric transport of radioactive particles cannot be ruled out. To address these concerns and to provide a better basis for evaluating possible radiological impacts of potential releases in case a salvage operation is initiated, we assessed the atmospheric transport of radionuclides and deposition in Norway from a hypothetical criticality accident on board the K-27. To achieve this, a long term (33 years) meteorological database has been prepared and used for selection of the worst case meteorological scenarios for each of three selected locations of the potential accident. Next, the dispersion model SNAP was run with the source term for the worst-case accident scenario and selected meteorological scenarios. The results showed predictions to be very sensitive to the estimation of the source term for the worst-case accident and especially to the sizes and densities of released radioactive particles. The results indicated that a large area of Norway could be affected, but that the deposition in Northern Norway would be considerably higher than in other areas of the country. The simulations showed that deposition from the worst-case scenario of a hypothetical K-27 accident would be at least two orders of magnitude lower than the deposition observed in Norway following the Chernobyl accident.
PubMed ID
25804322 View in PubMed
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Characterization of uranium and plutonium containing particles originating from the nuclear weapons accident in Thule, Greenland, 1968.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175887
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2005;81(1):21-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
O C Lind
B. Salbu
K. Janssens
K. Proost
H. Dahlgaard
Author Affiliation
Isotope Laboratory, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian 10 University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 As, Norway. ole-christian.lind@umb.no
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2005;81(1):21-32
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation - statistics & numerical data
Autoradiography
Electron Probe Microanalysis
Elementary Particle Interactions
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Greenland
Humans
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Oxidation-Reduction
Particle Size
Plutonium - analysis - chemistry
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radioactive fallout - analysis
Radioactive Hazard Release - statistics & numerical data
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Spectrometry, Gamma
Synchrotrons
Uranium - analysis - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
To improve long-term radioecological impact assessment for the contaminated ecosystem of Bylot Sound, Greenland, U and Pu containing particles have been characterized with respect to particle size, elemental distribution, morphology and oxidation states. Based on scanning electron microscopy with XRMA, particles ranging from about 20 to 40 microm were isolated. XRMA and mu-XRF mapping demonstrated that U and Pu were homogeneously distributed throughout the particles, indicating that U and Pu have been fused. Furthermore, mu-XANES showed that U and Pu in the particles were present as mixed oxides. U was found to be in oxidation state IV whereas Pu apparently is a mixture of Pu(III) and Pu(IV). As previous assessments are based on PuO2 only, revisions should be made, taking Pu(III) into account.
PubMed ID
15748658 View in PubMed
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Chernobyl fallout radionuclides in Utah residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37733
Source
Health Phys. 1990 Apr;58(4):533-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990

Comparative analysis between radiation doses obtained by EPR dosimetry using tooth enamel and established analytical methods for the population of radioactively contaminated territories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261105
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2014 Jun;159(1-4):125-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Alexander I Ivannikov
Valeri G Skvortsov
Valeri F Stepanenko
Kassym Sh Zhumadilov
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2014 Jun;159(1-4):125-9
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Body Burden
Dental Enamel - radiation effects
Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy - methods
Humans
Radiation Dosage
Radiation monitoring
Radioactive fallout - analysis
Radioactive Hazard Release
Radioactive Pollutants - analysis
Rural Population
Russia
Abstract
A comparative analysis of radiation doses determined by tooth enamel electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and by an acknowledged analytical method is performed for individual doses and for average doses in population of some settlements of the Bryansk region (Russia), which have been contaminated after the Chernobyl nuclear accident. The analysis is performed for doses in the range of 0-200 mGy for individuals and in the range of 0-50 mGy for the averaged populations. The method of orthogonal distance linear regression is used for the analysis. For both data sets the slopes of the regression line close to unity and the intercept close to zero are obtained, which indicates that doses determined by these two methods agree with each other. The root-mean-square difference between the results of EPR and analytical methods is estimated to be 35 mGy for individual doses and 15 mGy for averaged doses, which is consistent with uncertainty of these methods.
PubMed ID
24771210 View in PubMed
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Contribution of different foodstuffs to the internal exposure of rural inhabitants in Russia after the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193324
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2001;93(4):331-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
I G Travnikova
G J Bruk
V N Shutov
A B Bazjukin
M I Balonov
T. Rahola
M. Tillander
Author Affiliation
Institute of Radiation Hygiene, 8 Mira Str., 197101, St Petersburg, Russia. Irina@IT6293.spb.edu
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2001;93(4):331-9
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Burden
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Humans
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive fallout - analysis
Radioactive Hazard Release
Rural Population
Russia
Abstract
In a large village, Veprin of the Bryansk region of Russia contaminated with radionuclides as a result of the Chernobyl accident, 137Cs concentration in food products of agricultural produce and natural origin was regularly measured, local inhabitants were polled on the composition of their diet, and the 137Cs content in their bodies was measured at the same time. These results were used as the basis for calculation of annual effective doses of internal exposure to inhabitants and for reconstruction of the dose during the entire period after the accident (1986-1996). The efficiency of countermeasures performed for reduction of the internal dose was assessed. The internal dose in inhabitants during the 10 years after the accident was shown to be reduced by countermeasures by a factor of 2, namely down to 35 mSv instead of the expected 70 mSv. The dose of external gamma radiation during the same time period is close to the obtained dose of internal exposure. The presence of peat and water-meadow soils in the vicinity of this village that are characterised by high transfer factors for radionuclides from soil to vegetation causes a high contribution of internal exposure to the total dose of population exposure. The contribution of natural products to the internal dose increased from 6% in 1987 increased to 25% in 1996. The individual content of 137Cs in the body of inhabitants reliably correlates with consumption of milk in the initial period after the accident and with consumption of forest mushrooms in the subsequent period.
PubMed ID
11548360 View in PubMed
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Design of a radiation surveillance unit for an unmanned aerial vehicle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175888
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2005;81(1):1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
K. Kurvinen
P. Smolander
R. Pöllänen
S. Kuukankorpi
M. Kettunen
J. Lyytinen
Author Affiliation
STUK--Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, P.O. Box 14, FI-00881 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2005;81(1):1-10
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation
Aerospace Medicine
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Aircraft
Amplifiers, Electronic
Emergency Medical Service Communication Systems
Equipment Design
Finland
Geographic Information Systems - instrumentation
Humans
Military Personnel
Military science
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Radiation Monitoring - instrumentation
Radioactive fallout - analysis
Radioactive Hazard Release
Scintillation Counting - instrumentation
Semiconductors
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted - instrumentation
Spectrometry, Gamma - instrumentation
Video Recording - instrumentation
Abstract
This paper describes a prototype of a compact environmental radiation surveillance instrument designed for a Ranger unmanned aerial vehicle. The instrument, which can be used for tracking a radioactive plume, mapping fallout and searching for point sources, consists of three different detector types (GM, NaI(Tl) and CZT) and an air sampling unit. In addition to the standard electronics for data acquisition, the system contains an onboard computer, a GPS receiver and environmental sensors, all enclosed in a single housing manufactured of fiberglass-reinforced composite material. The data collected during the flight is transmitted in real-time to the ground station via a TETRA radio network. The radiation surveillance unit is an independent module and as such can be used in, for example, airplanes, helicopters and cars.
PubMed ID
15748656 View in PubMed
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59 records – page 1 of 6.