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105 records – page 1 of 11.

137Cs concentration among children in areas contaminated with radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident: Mogilev and Gomel Oblasts, Belarus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35314
Source
Health Phys. 1995 May;68(5):733-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
W S Watson
Source
Health Phys. 1995 May;68(5):733-5
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Body Burden
Byelarus
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects - analysis
Child
Humans
Power Plants
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects - analysis
Ukraine
Notes
Comment On: Health Phys. 1994 Sep;67(3):272-58056594
Comment In: Health Phys. 1995 Dec;69(6):9877493819
PubMed ID
7730075 View in PubMed
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The accident at Chernobyl and outcome of pregnancy in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38150
Source
BMJ. 1989 Apr 15;298(6679):995-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1989
Author
T. Harjulehto
T. Aro
H. Rita
T. Rytömaa
L. Saxén
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
BMJ. 1989 Apr 15;298(6679):995-7
Date
Apr-15-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Accidents
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Geography
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Time Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the outcome of pregnancy in Finnish women after the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant on 26 April 1986. DESIGN--Geographic and temporal cohort study. SETTING--Finland divided into three zones according to amount of radioactive fallout. SUBJECTS--All children who were exposed to radiation during their fetal development. Children born before any effects of the accident could be postulated--that is, between 1 January 1984 and 30 June 1986--served as controls. INTERVENTIONS--Children were divided into three temporal groups: controls, children who were expected to be born in August to December 1986, and children who were expected to be born in February to December 1987. They were also divided, separately, into three groups according to the three geographic zones. END POINT--Incidence of congenital malformations, preterm births, and perinatal deaths. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--There were no significant differences in the incidence of malformations or perinatal deaths among the three temporal and three geographic groups. A significant increase in preterm births occurred among children who were exposed to radiation during the first trimester whose mothers lived in zones 2 and 3, where the external dose rate and estimated surface activity of caesium-137 were highest. CONCLUSIONS--The results suggest that the amount of radioactive fallout that Finnish people were exposed to after the accident at Chernobyl was not high enough to cause fetal damage in children born at term. The higher incidence of premature births among malformed children in the most heavily polluted areas, however, remains unexplained.
Notes
Comment In: BMJ. 1989 May 20;298(6684):13842502266
PubMed ID
2499391 View in PubMed
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The accident at Chernobyl and trisomy 21 in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36798
Source
Mutat Res. 1992 Mar;275(2):81-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
T. Harjulehto-Mervaala
R. Salonen
T. Aro
L. Saxén
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Mutat Res. 1992 Mar;275(2):81-6
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21 - radiation effects
Cohort Studies
Down Syndrome - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Matched-Pair Analysis
Maternal Age
Nuclear Reactors
Power Plants
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prevalence
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Trisomy
Ukraine
Abstract
Our objective was to explore whether the radiation fallout in Finland after the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in April 1986 led to an increased incidence of trisomy 21. In this geographic and temporal cohort study, the country was divided into three zones according to the amounts of radioactive fallout and internal radiation caused by two cesium isotopes. The 518 cytologically verified cases of trisomy 21 were divided into a control group (conceived before the accident), and a study group of children whose expected dates of birth were in the post-accident years 1987-1988, i.e., pregnancies commenced after May 1986. The cases were also divided into three subgroups according to the zones of radiation. There were no significant differences in prevalence of trisomy 21 between the control and study groups nor between the three zones in spite of the significant differences in the levels of radiation and in the body burden that prevailed throughout the study period. Power estimates showed that in the two zones of lower radiation, an increase of 0.5% in the prevalence would have been detected with a power of 0.85, and in the somewhat smaller zone of the highest radiation, with a power of 0.70. The study lends no further support to the view that the low radiation fallout in western Europe would have been causally associated with trisomy 21.
PubMed ID
1379341 View in PubMed
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[A comparative study of the immunological (antimicrosomal antibodies) and cytogenetic indices of children living in radioactively contaminated areas of Bryansk Province]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34277
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 1997 May-Jun;37(3):404-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
A P Shinkarkina
A A Zhloba
V K Podgorodnichewnko
A V Sevan'kaev
A M Poverennyi
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 1997 May-Jun;37(3):404-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Autoantibodies - blood
Cells, Cultured
Child
Chromosome Aberrations
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Humans
Lymphocytes - radiation effects
Microsomes - immunology
Nuclear Reactors
Power Plants
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Russia
Thyroid Gland - immunology - radiation effects
Ukraine
Abstract
The chromosome dicentric aberrations in the lymphocytes and levels of antibodies to human thyroid microsomal antigen in the serum of the children lived in the area of Bryansk Province suffered from the Chernobyl accident was examined. Correlation between those tests was not estimated: the autoantibodies were revealed in group with dicentrics and without those in 4.0% and 4.5% of cases correspondingly. Antimicrosomal antibodies were revealed more frequently (5.0%) and in higher titers in the children from the more polluted Bryansk Province than in those from Kaluga Province (3.1%). These data can testify about the role of inside radiation of thyroid gland in appearance of autoimmune thyroiditis signs.
PubMed ID
9244530 View in PubMed
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[After the Chernobyl accident: no basis for increased cancer risk in Sweden]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84703
Source
Lakartidningen. 2007 Oct 31-Nov 6;104(44):3253-4
Publication Type
Article

[A morphogenetic analysis of a callus culture of Nicotiana tabacum L. in chronic irradiation of the plants]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69089
Source
Tsitol Genet. 1993 Jan-Feb;27(1):63-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
A A Konopleva
D M Grodzinskii
L V Zheltonozhskaia
Source
Tsitol Genet. 1993 Jan-Feb;27(1):63-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - adverse effects
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Nuclear Reactors
Plants, Toxic
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Time Factors
Tobacco - anatomy & histology - genetics - radiation effects
Ukraine
Abstract
The callus culture of Nicotiana tabacum L. was obtained from the plants chronically irradiated in 10 km zone of Chernobyl Atomic Power Station. The tobacco plants in 10 km zone of Chernobyl during the vegetation period exposed to irradiation with the average dose rate of 0.36 mA/kg (5 mP/h). The total absorbed dose was approximately 0,31 Gy. The morphogenetic analysis of this culture shows a considerable decrease of regeneration index and callus weight.
PubMed ID
8316955 View in PubMed
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[An algorithm for the reconstruction of irradiation doses based on computational and instrumental methods].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198086
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2000 Feb;321(2):61-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000

An approach to detecting delayed effects of radioactive contamination on industrial-urban-area dwellers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218196
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1994 May;102(5):470-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
L I Privalova
B A Katsnelson
E V Polzik
V S Kazantsev
Lipatov GYa
Y B Beikin
Author Affiliation
Medical Research Centre for Prophylaxis and Health Protection in Industrial Workers, Ekaterinburg, Russia.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1994 May;102(5):470-4
Date
May-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Environmental health
Environmental monitoring
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Radioactive Hazard Release
Russia
Time Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
Detecting changes in humans that result from radioactive contamination of the area of residence many years after an incident (i.e., when the radiation has substantially decayed) presents a difficult epidemiological problem. Problems of this kind are even more complicated ina areas where the population is continually exposed to other harmful man-made factors. The city of Kamensk-Uralsky (Sverdlovsk region, Russia) is a good case in point. In 1957, part of Kamensk-Uralsky was contaminated as the result of an accident at the Kyshtym nuclear plant. In addition, the population of the contaminated area is being exposed to atmospheric emissions from several industrial enterprises. Two comparable groups of residents were formed: one in the contaminated are and another in a control area within the same city characterized by similar levels of chemical pollution but substantially lower radioactive contamination. The groups were composed of only those people who had been living in these areas continually since time of the accident and who were under 15 years of age at the time of the accident. The groups were matched by sex, age, and socio-occupational characteristics. For each subject, data were gathered on more than 50 parameters including hematological, immunological, and biochemical indices of the health status. All these data were obtained from blood tests taken in the fall of 1992. Data processing was carried out with the help of a computerized mathematical pattern recognition methodology, which ensured reliable discrimination between the generalized health status in the areas under study. We found that the health status of inhabitants of the area more contaminated with radioactive fallouts was adversely affected by radiation.
Notes
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1991 Oct 1;134(7):675-881951272
Cites: Med Lav. 1990 Mar-Apr;81(2):87-952250613
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1989 Jul;82:311-212676501
PubMed ID
8593851 View in PubMed
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[An assessment of the permissible level of a mixture of radionuclides from the Chernobyl fallout in human lungs]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73504
Source
Radiobiologiia. 1992 Mar-Apr;32(2):163-71
Publication Type
Article
Author
A K Sukhoruchkin
Source
Radiobiologiia. 1992 Mar-Apr;32(2):163-71
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Aerosols
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - adverse effects - analysis
English Abstract
Female
Health Physics
Humans
Lung - radiation effects
Male
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Nuclear Reactors
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects - analysis
Radioisotopes - adverse effects - analysis
Solubility
Ukraine
Abstract
The permissible level of a radionuclide mixture, resulted from the Chernobyl burst, in the human being lungs was determined for two kinds of compounds: absolutely insoluble compounds and soluble compounds in the state of equilibrium. For this purpose the data were used concerning the radionuclide composition and aerosol disperse in lower atmosphere which were obtained by the Department for Dosimetric Control (NPO "Pripiat'"). The results of measurements of 137Cs content taken by the use of human radiation spectrometer (HRS) needed an adequate estimation: low level of 137Cs in the human lungs and body within the Chernobyl NPP, zone does not guarantee radiation security. The notion "permissible content" and the possibility of using thereof in the individual dosimetric control are discussed.
PubMed ID
1598388 View in PubMed
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An ecological analysis of leukemia incidence around the highest 137Cs concentration in Poland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19567
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Sep;12(7):653-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
A. Tukiendorf
Author Affiliation
Technical University, Opole, Poland. antu@po.opole.pl
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Sep;12(7):653-9
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Bayes Theorem
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Markov Chains
Poland - epidemiology
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Ukraine
Abstract
Cancer has long been known to be a hazard of exposure to ionizing radiation. However, the assessment of health effects from exposure to radiation is a matter of considerable controversy. This paper presents results of a retrospective study of leukemia incidence (203-207, ICD-9) around the highest 137Cs pollution in Poland (as an effect of the Czarnobyl disaster and/or military bomb tests). The data relating to all the registered leukemias in males and females originated from the Regional Cancer Registry in Opole. The information on 137Cs concentration rates in Opole province was derived from the state monitoring provided by the Polish Geological Institute in Warsaw. The spatial analysis--based on the random-effects Poisson regression model--was carried out via the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique (Gibbs sampling) using BUGS software. The model incorporated epidemiological data and an ecological covariate--isotope concentrations--and provided a framework for estimating the strength of a dose-response relationship. The differences in incidence levels were quantified by traditional standardized morbidity ratios (SMRs) and presented in thematic maps as well as in combined charts of distance-disease-dose relations. Additionally, to assess spatial disease clustering, a Tango test was adopted. The results of this ecological study suggest that the 137Cs concentrations did not have any negative influence on the exposed population.
PubMed ID
11552713 View in PubMed
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105 records – page 1 of 11.