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366 records – page 1 of 37.

3D simulation as a tool for improving the safety culture during remediation work at Andreeva Bay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265458
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2014 Dec;34(4):755-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
K. Chizhov
M K Sneve
I. Szoke
I. Mazur
N K Mark
I. Kudrin
N. Shandala
A. Simakov
G M Smith
A. Krasnoschekov
A. Kosnikov
I. Kemsky
V. Kryuchkov
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2014 Dec;34(4):755-73
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decontamination - methods
Hazardous Waste Sites
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Models, organizational
Norway
Organizational Culture
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radiation Protection - methods
Radioactive Waste - prevention & control
Russia
Safety Management - organization & administration
Abstract
Andreeva Bay in northwest Russia hosts one of the former coastal technical bases of the Northern Fleet. Currently, this base is designated as the Andreeva Bay branch of Northwest Center for Radioactive Waste Management (SevRAO) and is a site of temporary storage (STS) for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and other radiological waste generated during the operation and decommissioning of nuclear submarines and ships. According to an integrated expert evaluation, this site is the most dangerous nuclear facility in northwest Russia. Environmental rehabilitation of the site is currently in progress and is supported by strong international collaboration. This paper describes how the optimization principle (ALARA) has been adopted during the planning of remediation work at the Andreeva Bay STS and how Russian-Norwegian collaboration greatly contributed to ensuring the development and maintenance of a high level safety culture during this process. More specifically, this paper describes how integration of a system, specifically designed for improving the radiological safety of workers during the remediation work at Andreeva Bay, was developed in Russia. It also outlines the 3D radiological simulation and virtual reality based systems developed in Norway that have greatly facilitated effective implementation of the ALARA principle, through supporting radiological characterisation, work planning and optimization, decision making, communication between teams and with the authorities and training of field operators.
PubMed ID
25254659 View in PubMed
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[6-week vacation 1946 but now the law on roentgen leave is undermined. Protests from professional quarters - radiation injuries still bad].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247085
Source
Vardfacket. 1979 Jun 28;3(12):50-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-28-1979
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2008 Sep;28(3):277-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Lindell Bo
Sowby David
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2008 Sep;28(3):277-82
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental pollution
Humans
International Cooperation
Organizations, Nonprofit
Radiation Effects
Radiation Protection
United Nations
Abstract
In the mid-1950s, concern was increasing about the possible effects from the radioactive fallout resulting from nuclear weapon testing. Various scientists from non-nuclear countries such as Sweden and Canada made their politicians aware of the potential hazards of fallout. This concern went up to the General Assembly of the United Nations, which took the unique step of appointing a scientific committee to advise it about the levels and effects of radiation, especially from nuclear bomb testing. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation was established in 1955 and held its first working meeting in September 1956. In less than two years it produced its first, pioneering report, which produced previously secret information about fallout exposure, and hitherto unknown information about natural background and medical exposure.
PubMed ID
18714141 View in PubMed
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[Action programs for working with ionizing radiation clarified: an aid in setting requirements for a safer work environment].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242815
Source
Vardfacket. 1982 Oct 21;6(19):18-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-21-1982
Author
K. Johnson
Source
Vardfacket. 1982 Oct 21;6(19):18-9
Date
Oct-21-1982
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control
Radiation Injuries - prevention & control
Radiation Protection
Sweden
PubMed ID
6924531 View in PubMed
Less detail

Activity concentrations of 226Ra and 228Ra in drilled well water in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168789
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2006;121(4):406-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
P. Vesterbacka
T. Turtiainen
S. Heinävaara
H. Arvela
Author Affiliation
STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, PO Box 14, 00881 Helsinki, Finland. pia.vesterbacka@stuk.fi
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2006;121(4):406-12
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Background Radiation
Body Burden
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Finland
Humans
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radiation Protection - methods
Radon - analysis
Relative Biological Effectiveness
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
The activity concentrations of (226)Ra and (228)Ra in drinking water were determined in water samples from 176 drilled wells. (226)Ra activity concentrations were in the range of
PubMed ID
16777909 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A decrease in the level of erythrocytes with micronuclei under the influence of pyrimidine and thiazolidine derivatives in the blood of persons who came under radiation exposure as a result of the accident at the Siberian Chemical Combine]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33545
Source
Tsitol Genet. 1998 Apr-May;32(3):26-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
N N Il'inskikh
E N Il'inskikh
I N Il'inskikh
Source
Tsitol Genet. 1998 Apr-May;32(3):26-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adult
Air Pollution, Radioactive - adverse effects
Chemical Industry
Child
Chromosome Aberrations
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Erythrocyte Count - drug effects - radiation effects
Erythrocytes - drug effects - radiation effects
Humans
Micronuclei, Chromosome-Defective - drug effects - radiation effects
Micronucleus Tests
Pentoxyl - administration & dosage
Radiation-Protective Agents - administration & dosage
Radiochemistry
Rural Population
Siberia
Tablets
Thiazoles - administration & dosage
Abstract
The authors have found that pentoxylum (pyrimidine derivative) and leucogenum (thyazolidine derivative) are capable or reducing the number of cells with micronuclei in the blood of people who suffered from the radiation accident at the radiochemical works of the Siberian chemical plant. The most effective decrease in the cells with micronuclei in adults was observed two weeks after treatment, while in children the same result was achieved with leucogenum on the third day.
PubMed ID
9879104 View in PubMed
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The adequacy of current occupational standards for protecting the health of nuclear workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24709
Source
Occup Med. 1991 Oct-Dec;6(4):725-39
Publication Type
Article
Author
B E Lambert
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Biology, Medical College of St. Bartholomew's Hospital, University of London, England.
Source
Occup Med. 1991 Oct-Dec;6(4):725-39
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Forecasting
Humans
Incidence
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - prevention & control
Nuclear Reactors
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Protection - standards
Abstract
It will be clear from the aforegoing that occupational standards have varied over the past 30-40 years since the beginnings of the nuclear industry. Our perception of risk rates for cancer mortality and genetic effects has changed, such that the rates have been constantly revised upwards. Logically, dose limits should have been reduced in proportion, but this assumes a constant approach to the "tolerability" or "acceptability" of risk and this has not been demonstrated. Dose limits are not seen by management in the nuclear industry as the only plank in the structure of radiation protection; emphasis is also being given to the "optimization" ethic. In these circumstances a good test of the efficacy of the system of radiation control in limiting health effects is needed. As can be seen, no such study is available and, given the doses received and the numbers of workers involved, it is unlikely that any epidemiologic study, apart from studies on miners, will have sufficient statistical power to be totally unequivocal. However, some studies have shown cancer mortality associations with radiation exposure that are significant. Probably the best way to mitigate the inherent drawbacks in these studies is to pool data-sets, and this is being done. Other improvements will include estimates of cancer incidence in countries with cancer registries (e.g., U.K., Canada, and Sweden) and to perhaps go beyond epidemiologic data to consider sensitive biologic markers as indices of exposure. Overall the conclusion must be that the radiation industry cannot be complacent and for some tasks in the processes involved (e.g., uranium mining) there is strong evidence of a history of unacceptable health effects occurring.
PubMed ID
1962255 View in PubMed
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Advances in NORM management in Norway and the application of ICRP's 2007 recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119562
Source
Ann ICRP. 2012 Oct-Dec;41(3-4):332-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Liland
P. Strand
I. Amundsen
H. Natvig
M. Nilsen
R. Lystad
K E Frogg
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, P.O. Box 55, No-1332 Osteras, Norway. astrid.liland@nrpa.no
Source
Ann ICRP. 2012 Oct-Dec;41(3-4):332-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemical Industry
Environmental Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Extraction and Processing Industry
Government Regulation
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
International Agencies
Norway
Oil and Gas Fields
Radiation Protection - standards
Radioactive Waste - prevention & control
Waste Management - standards
Abstract
In Norway, the largest reported quantities of radioactive discharges and radioactive waste containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) come from the oil and gas sector, and smaller quantities of other NORM waste are also produced by industrial or mining processes. The Gulen final repository for radioactive waste from the oil and gas industry from the Norwegian continental shelf was opened in 2008 and has a capacity of 6000 tonnes. As of 1 January 2011, a new regulation was enforced whereby radioactive waste and radioactive pollution was integrated in the Pollution Control Act from 1981. This means that radioactive waste and radioactive pollution are now regulated under the same legal framework as all other pollutants and hazardous wastes. The regulation establishes two sets of criteria defining radioactive waste: a lower value for when waste is considered to be radioactive waste, and a higher value, in most cases, for when this waste must be disposed of in a final waste repository. For example, waste containing = 1 Bq/g of Ra-226 is defined as radioactive waste, while radioactive waste containing = 10 Bq/g of Ra-226 must be disposed of in a final repository. Radioactive waste between 1 and 10B q/g can be handled and disposed of by waste companies who have a licence for handling hazardous waste according to the Pollution Control Act. Alternatively, they will need a separate licence for handling radioactive waste from the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority. The goal of the new regulation is that all radioactive waste should be handled and stored in a safe manner, and discharges should be controlled through a licensing regime in order to avoid/not pose unnecessary risk to humans or the environment. This paper will elaborate on the new regulation of radioactive waste and the principles of NORM management in Norway in view of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's 2007 Recommendations.
PubMed ID
23089033 View in PubMed
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[Against radiation protection merely with thick lead].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246757
Source
Vardfacket. 1979 Oct 11;3(18):48-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-11-1979
Author
C. Olofsson
Source
Vardfacket. 1979 Oct 11;3(18):48-50
Date
Oct-11-1979
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Nurses
Radiation Injuries - prevention & control
Radiation Protection - standards
Sweden
PubMed ID
260594 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Albert Kiibus, first radiation protection inspector of the SSI (Federal Institute for Radiation Protection): advantages and disadvantages of various dosimeters].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246059
Source
Vardfacket. 1980 Feb 21;4(4):56-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-21-1980
Author
A. Kiibus
Source
Vardfacket. 1980 Feb 21;4(4):56-7
Date
Feb-21-1980
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Film Dosimetry - standards
Humans
Radiation Monitoring - instrumentation
Radiation Protection - standards
Sweden
PubMed ID
6899682 View in PubMed
Less detail

366 records – page 1 of 37.