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Acoustic and perceptual evaluation of voice and speech quality: a study of patients with laryngeal cancer treated with laryngectomy vs irradiation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21227
Source
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1999 Feb;125(2):157-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
C. Finizia
H. Dotevall
E. Lundström
J. Lindström
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. Caterina.Finizia@orlss.gu.se
Source
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1999 Feb;125(2):157-63
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Laryngeal Neoplasms - radiotherapy - surgery
Laryngectomy
Larynx - radiation effects
Larynx, Artificial
Male
Middle Aged
Radiation Injuries - diagnosis - physiopathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Salvage Therapy
Sound Spectrography
Speech Intelligibility - physiology
Speech Production Measurement
Speech, Esophageal
Voice Quality - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare voice and speech function in patients who underwent laryngectomy with that of 2 control groups. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study comparing acoustic and temporal variables with perceptual evaluations in 3 subject groups. SETTING: University hospital in Göteborg, Sweden. SUBJECTS: Two groups of patients with laryngeal carcinoma were examined: 12 male patients who had laryngectomy and were using a tracheoesophageal prosthesis and 12 male patients treated with radical radiotherapy who had a preserved larynx. The third group consisted of 10 normal controls without laryngeal disease. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Acoustic variables were fundamental frequency, absolute fundamental frequency perturbation, speech rate, and maximum phonation time. Perceptual evaluation included 15 listeners' perceptual evaluation and the patients' self-assessment of speech intelligibility, voice quality, and speech acceptability. RESULTS: No significant acoustic or temporal differences were found between the laryngectomy and radical radiotherapy groups. There was a significant difference between the patient groups in perceptual evaluation. Both groups of patients differed from normal controls in acoustic and temporal measures, where the laryngectomy group generally deviated more from the normal controls than the patient group treated with radiotherapy. There was a weak, but significant, correlation between absolute fundamental frequency perturbation and perceived voice quality. CONCLUSIONS: Perceptual evaluations could indicate significant differences between the patients who underwent laryngectomy and irradiated patients, where the acoustic analysis failed to reflect these differences. Both patient groups could be distinguished according to acoustic and temporal measures when compared with normal controls. The acoustic analyses were more sufficient in voices without severe dysfunction.
PubMed ID
10037282 View in PubMed
Less detail

Caring for survivors of the Chernobyl disaster. What the clinician should know.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23130
Source
JAMA. 1995 Aug 2;274(5):408-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2-1995
Author
A D Weinberg
S. Kripalani
P L McCarthy
W J Schull
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Tex 77030, USA.
Source
JAMA. 1995 Aug 2;274(5):408-12
Date
Aug-2-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adult
Child
Emigration and Immigration
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Humans
Neuropsychological Tests
Physical Examination
Physician's Role
Power Plants
Radiation Injuries - diagnosis - etiology
Radiation, Ionizing
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Survival
Thyroid Function Tests
Time Factors
Ukraine
United States
Abstract
The health status of approximately 1 million immigrants in the United States and Israel may have been adversely affected by radiation exposure as a result of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster and cleanup efforts. Many of these immigrants suffer from significant psychological distress, fearing that they have a radiation-induced illness. Based on a review of the literature and our experience from the US National Chernobyl Registry Coordinating Center, we recommend that medical management of these immigrants include routine physical examination, with particular attention to the thyroid gland. Adults should receive regular cancer screening as well as routine blood chemistry tests, thyroid function tests, complete blood cell count, and urinalysis. Children should be examined regularly, with attention to the thyroid and overall body growth. It is reasonable for children to undergo thyroid studies, a complete blood cell count, or neuropsychiatric testing if there is clinical suspicion of a disorder. Given the long latency period for disease induction by radiation exposure, it is still too early to fully assess and draw conclusions concerning the possible health effects of the Chernobyl disaster, and long-term follow-up of all potentially affected individuals is important.
PubMed ID
7616637 View in PubMed
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[Certain features of clinical and hormonal status of children of the southwestern areas of the Bryansk region exposed to radiation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37387
Source
Pediatriia. 1991;(12):84-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991

The Chornobyl accident and cognitive functioning: a follow-up study of infant evacuees at age 19 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86050
Source
Psychol Med. 2008 Apr;38(4):489-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Taormina D P
Rozenblatt S.
Guey L T
Gluzman S F
Carlson G A
Havenaar J M
Zakhozha V.
Kotov R.
Bromet E J
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY, USA.
Source
Psychol Med. 2008 Apr;38(4):489-97
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attention - radiation effects
Attitude to Health
Brain - radiation effects
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Child
Child, Preschool
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intelligence - radiation effects
Learning Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Male
Memory Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Mental Recall - radiation effects
Neuropsychological Tests
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Radiation Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Ukraine
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The cognitive and academic outcomes of infants exposed to radiation after the meltdown at Chornobyl have been intensely debated. Western-based investigations indicate that no adverse effects occurred, but local studies reported increased cognitive impairments in exposed compared with non-exposed children. Our initial study found that at age 11 years, school grades and neuropsychological performance were similar in 300 children evacuated to Kiev as infants or in utero compared with 300 classmate controls, yet more evacuee mothers believed that their children had memory problems. This study re-examined the children's performance and academic achievement at age 19 years.METHOD: In 2005-2006, we conducted an 8-year follow-up of the evacuees (n=265) and classmate controls (n=261) assessed in Kiev in 1997. Outcomes included university attendance, tests of intelligence, attention, and memory, and subjective appraisals of memory problems. Scores were standardized using a local population-based control group (n=327). Analyses were stratified by parental education. RESULTS: Evacuees and classmates performed similarly and in the normal range on all tests, and no differential temporal changes were found. The results were comparable for the in utero subsample. The rates of university attendance and self-reported memory problems were also similar. Nevertheless, the evacuee mothers were almost three times as likely to report that their children had memory problems compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS: Chornobyl did not influence the cognitive functioning of exposed infants although more evacuee mothers still believed that their offspring had memory problems. These lingering worries reflect a wider picture of persistent health concerns as a consequence of the accident.
PubMed ID
18177528 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Clinical-immunological characteristics of the state of the thyroid gland in children exposed to ionizing radiation because of the Chernobyl AES accident]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37394
Source
Pediatriia. 1991;(12):26-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
A K Cheban
O S Dekhtiareva
O V Kopylova
A A Chumak
D E Afanas'ev
M G Taranenko
N L Avramenko
Source
Pediatriia. 1991;(12):26-9
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Autoimmune Diseases - etiology
Child
English Abstract
Humans
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - diagnosis
Risk factors
Thyroid Diseases - diagnosis - etiology
Thyroid Gland - radiation effects
Thyroxine - blood
Ukraine
Abstract
Overall 806 children evacuated from the city of Pripyat were examined for the thyroid condition. The children who received a dose of more than 30 rad for the thyroid manifested primary response in the form of euthyroid hyperthyroxinemia, a high risk of the development in future of autoimmune diseases in the lack of hypothyrosis.
PubMed ID
1788016 View in PubMed
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[Current problems of clinical radiation medicine]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24532
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 1992 Feb;70(2):3-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
A K Gus'kova
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 1992 Feb;70(2):3-7
Date
Feb-1992
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Nuclear Reactors
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Risk factors
Time Factors
USSR
Ukraine
Abstract
Results, prospects of studying the effects of ionizing radiation on human beings are considered with regard to the outcomes of the Chernobyl catastrophe and the results of a 5-year implementation of the All-Union Programme C-27. Present-day problems and approaches to investigation for the nearest 5-year period are formulated.
PubMed ID
1507813 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Diagnosis and treatment in connection with health hazards of "earth radiation"].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223576
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Jun 20;112(16):2122-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-1992
Author
H. Sigstad
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Jun 20;112(16):2122-3
Date
Jun-20-1992
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ethics, Medical
Humans
Norway
Quackery
Radiation Injuries - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Risk factors
PubMed ID
1523644 View in PubMed
Less detail

Differentiation of lung cancer and radiation fibrosis using magnetic resonance images: a case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4150
Source
Tokai J Exp Clin Med. 1990 Jul;15(4):293-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1990
Author
S. Shioya
M. Haida
Y. Ono
T. Ohta
Y. Hayashi
T. Kurata
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Tokai University, Kanagawa, Japan.
Source
Tokai J Exp Clin Med. 1990 Jul;15(4):293-8
Date
Jul-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diagnosis, Differential
Fibrosis
Humans
Lung - pathology - radiation effects
Lung Neoplasms - diagnosis - radiography
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Radiation Injuries - diagnosis
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
We used magnetic resonance imaging to differentiate residual and recurrent lung cancer from the surrounding radiation pulmonary fibrosis in a 62-year-old patient. The cancer's signal intensity was greater than the fibrotic lung tissue's intensity in an ECG-gated image with relatively short repetition and echo times and, also, in images with long repetition and echo times.
PubMed ID
2130536 View in PubMed
Less detail

EEG patterns in persons exposed to ionizing radiation as a result of the Chernobyl accident: part 1: conventional EEG analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46059
Source
J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2001;13(4):441-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
K N Loganovsky
K L Yuryev
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Research Centre for Radition Medicine of Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev. kosti@morion.kiev.ua
Source
J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2001;13(4):441-58
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adult
Brain - physiopathology - radiation effects
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Electroencephalography - radiation effects
Evoked Potentials - radiation effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - physiopathology
Power Plants
Radiation Injuries - diagnosis - physiopathology
Reference Values
Relief Work
Ukraine
Abstract
Prospective conventional EEG study was carried out 3-5 and 10-13 years after the Chernobyl accident (1986) in patients who had acute radiation sickness and in emergency workers in 1986 ("liquidators"). Control groups comprised healthy volunteers; veterans of the Afghanistan war with posttraumatic stress disorder; veterans with mild traumatic brain injury; and patients with dyscirculatory encephalopathy. In 3-5 years after irradiation, there were irritated EEG changes with paroxysmal activity shifted to the left frontotemporal region (cortical-limbic overactivation) that were transformed 10-13 years after irradiation toward a low-voltage EEG pattern with excess of fast (beta) and slow (delta) activity together with depression of alpha and theta activity (organic brain damage with inhibition of the cortical-limbic system). Quantitative EEG is likely to be very informative for investigation of dose-effect relationships.
PubMed ID
11748314 View in PubMed
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56 records – page 1 of 6.