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Advancements in web-database applications for rabies surveillance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132506
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2011;10:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Erin E Rees
Bruno Gendron
Frédérick Lelièvre
Nathalie Coté
Denise Bélanger
Author Affiliation
Département de pathologie et microbiologie, Le Groupe de recherche en épidémiologie des zoonoses et santé publique, Université de Montréal, 3200 rue Sicotte, Saint-Hyacinthe, J2S 7C6, Canada. erinerees@gmail.com
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2011;10:48
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Databases, Factual
Humans
Internet
Population Surveillance - methods
Rabies - epidemiology
Software
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
Protection of public health from rabies is informed by the analysis of surveillance data from human and animal populations. In Canada, public health, agricultural and wildlife agencies at the provincial and federal level are responsible for rabies disease control, and this has led to multiple agency-specific data repositories. Aggregation of agency-specific data into one database application would enable more comprehensive data analyses and effective communication among participating agencies. In Québec, RageDB was developed to house surveillance data for the raccoon rabies variant, representing the next generation in web-based database applications that provide a key resource for the protection of public health.
RageDB incorporates data from, and grants access to, all agencies responsible for the surveillance of raccoon rabies in Québec. Technological advancements of RageDB to rabies surveillance databases include (1) automatic integration of multi-agency data and diagnostic results on a daily basis; (2) a web-based data editing interface that enables authorized users to add, edit and extract data; and (3) an interactive dashboard to help visualize data simply and efficiently, in table, chart, and cartographic formats. Furthermore, RageDB stores data from citizens who voluntarily report sightings of rabies suspect animals. We also discuss how sightings data can indicate public perception to the risk of racoon rabies and thus aid in directing the allocation of disease control resources for protecting public health.
RageDB provides an example in the evolution of spatio-temporal database applications for the storage, analysis and communication of disease surveillance data. The database was fast and inexpensive to develop by using open-source technologies, simple and efficient design strategies, and shared web hosting. The database increases communication among agencies collaborating to protect human health from raccoon rabies. Furthermore, health agencies have real-time access to a wide assortment of data documenting new developments in the raccoon rabies epidemic and this enables a more timely and appropriate response.
Notes
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2000 Dec 5;97(25):13666-7111069300
Cites: J Wildl Dis. 2001 Apr;37(2):265-7911310877
Cites: Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1997 Oct;57(4):457-639347964
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Feb;12(2):310-316494761
Cites: Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2010 Oct;10(8):801-920020812
Cites: Prev Vet Med. 2008 Aug 15;86(1-2):30-4218406482
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2009 Aug;15(8):1176-8419757549
Cites: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2010 Sep 15;237(6):646-5720839985
Cites: Int J Health Geogr. 2006;5:4717078890
PubMed ID
21810215 View in PubMed
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Adverse reactions from consumption of oral rabies vaccine baits in dogs in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279089
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2016 Sep 15;58(1):53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2016
Author
Tiina Nokireki
Martti Nevalainen
Liisa Sihvonen
Tuija Gadd
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2016 Sep 15;58(1):53
Date
Sep-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Behavior, Animal - drug effects
Dog Diseases - etiology - pathology
Dogs
Finland
Gastrointestinal Diseases - etiology - veterinary
Rabies Vaccines - adverse effects - pharmacology
Vaccination - adverse effects - veterinary
Abstract
Oral rabies vaccination of wildlife has effectively reduced the incidence of rabies in wildlife and has led to the elimination of rabies in large areas of Europe. The safety of oral rabies vaccines has been assessed in both target (red fox and raccoon dog) and several non-target species.
Since 2011, the competent authority in Finland has received a few reports of dogs experiencing adverse reactions that have been assumed to be caused by the consumption of baits containing oral rabies vaccine. The dogs usually exhibited gastrointestinal symptoms (vomiting, inappetence, constipation or diarrhoea) or behavioral symptoms (restlessness, listlessness and unwillingness to continue hunting).
Nevertheless, these adverse reactions are transient and non-life threatening. Even though the adverse reactions are unpleasant to individual dogs and their owners, the benefits of oral rabies vaccination clearly outweigh the risks.
PubMed ID
27633386 View in PubMed
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Alaska rabies control and immunization program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2098
Source
Pages 124-126 in Science for Alaska. Proceedings, Alaska Science Conference, 30th, Fairbanks, September 19-21. Alaska Div., American Association for the Advancement of Science and Alaska Section, American Chemical Society.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
Ritter, D.G.
Author Affiliation
Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Source
Pages 124-126 in Science for Alaska. Proceedings, Alaska Science Conference, 30th, Fairbanks, September 19-21. Alaska Div., American Association for the Advancement of Science and Alaska Section, American Chemical Society.
Date
1979
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Rabies
Zoonosis
Epidemics
Vaccine
Immunizations
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2031.
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An arctic fox rabies virus strain as the cause of human rabies in Russian Siberia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202258
Source
Arch Virol. 1999;144(3):627-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
I V Kuzmin
Author Affiliation
Institute for Natural Foci Infections, Omsk, Russia.
Source
Arch Virol. 1999;144(3):627-9
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Fatal Outcome
Foxes - virology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Rabies - immunology - pathology - virology
Rabies virus - immunology - isolation & purification
Russia
Siberia
Abstract
A case of human rabies in the arctic zone of Siberia is described. The victim was bitten by a wolf, but characterization of the isolate by monoclonal antibodies showed that it was an arctic fox virus strain. This discovery reaffirmed the value of strain typing rabies virus isolates in regions where this has not been done already: such characterization pertains to the identification of the reservoir host, to the natural history of the virus in the reservoir, and to future surveillance, post-exposure treatment, and public education in the region.
PubMed ID
10226626 View in PubMed
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An attempt to predict a possible existence of antiviral and antimicrobial activity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7388
Source
Med Hypotheses. 2002 May;58(5):429-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
G I Danilenko
Author Affiliation
Institute of Organic Chemistry, National Academy of Science, Ukraine. iochkiev@ukrpack.net
Source
Med Hypotheses. 2002 May;58(5):429-30
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-HIV Agents - pharmacology
Anti-Infective Agents - pharmacology
Antibodies, Viral - pharmacology
Antiviral Agents - pharmacology
Binding Sites
Humans
Models, Biological
Molecular Mimicry
Rabies virus - immunology
Abstract
It is known that many pathogenic and toxic agents may attach to binding site of the same endogenic receptor. Such an effect is due to the resemblance between chemical structures in foreign agents. One may imagine the structure which contains binding-site fragments and may compete with the receptor for foreign agents. Then next suggestions are probable: (1)The same substance may interact with some agents with established resemblance; (2) If substance (1) interacts with agents A and B and substance (2) influences agent (2) only then (2) ought to act at agent B as well. In terms 'key-keyhole' this means an existence of the key fitting several keyholes. Application of this conception has given a possibility to predict an anti-HIV and antimicrobial activity of an antirabies immunoglobulin.
PubMed ID
12056882 View in PubMed
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An epidemic of sylvatic rabies in Finland--descriptive epidemiology and results of oral vaccination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5863
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 1992;33(1):43-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
M. Nyberg
K. Kulonen
E. Neuvonen
C. Ek-Kommonen
M. Nuorgam
B. Westerling
Author Affiliation
Field Department, National Veterinary Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 1992;33(1):43-57
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Wild
Carnivora
Cats
Cattle
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Dogs
Finland - epidemiology
Foxes
Rabies - epidemiology - prevention & control - veterinary
Rabies Vaccines
Vaccination - veterinary
Abstract
When rabies reappeared in Finland in April 1988, the country had been rabies free since 1959. Soon a picture of sylvatic rabies become evident, its main vector and victim being the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides). Between 8 April 1988 and 16 February 1989, 66 virologically verified cases were recorded (48 raccoon dogs, 12 red foxes, 2 badgers, 2 cats, 1 dog and 1 dairy bull) in an area estimated at 1700 km2 in south-eastern Finland. The greatest distance between recorded cases was 67 km. A positive reaction with monoclonal antibody p-41 indicated that the virus was an arctic-type strain. A field trial on oral immunization of small predators was initiated in September 1988 using Tübingen fox baits according to the Bavarian model of bait distribution. Each bait contained 5*10(7) TCID50/ml modified live rabies virus (SAD-B19). The 6 months' surveillance indicate a seroconversion rate of 72% (N = 126) in the raccoon dog population, 67% (N = 56) in the red foxes and 13% (N = 16) in the badgers, when titers greater than or equal to 1.0 IU/ml are considered seropositive. In the whole follow-up period, no statistically significant difference could be detected between the raccoon dogs and red foxes in the rate of seroconversion or in the uptake of tetracycline from the baits. Notably high antibody levels were recorded in both raccoon dogs and red foxes within 4-5 months after vaccination. Of the seropositive animals, the proportion of animals with titers 3.0 IU/ml or greater was higher in raccoon dogs (73%) than in red foxes (51%) (x2 = 5.29, p less than 0.05). The trial shows that raccoon dogs can be immunized against rabies in the field with vaccine baits originally developed for controlling sylvatic rabies in foxes.
PubMed ID
1598857 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of immunofluorescence and PCR methods for detection of rabies in archival Carnoy-fixed, paraffin-embedded brain tissue.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202088
Source
Zentralbl Veterinarmed B. 1999 Apr;46(3):151-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
K. Kulonen
M. Fekadu
S. Whitfield
C K Warner
Author Affiliation
Department of Basic Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Zentralbl Veterinarmed B. 1999 Apr;46(3):151-5
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Brain - pathology - virology
Cats
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Dogs
Finland - epidemiology
Foxes
Humans
Mice
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods - veterinary
Rabies - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Rabies virus - isolation & purification
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Direct immunofluorescence and PCR detection methods were compared for sensitivity in evaluating the rabies status of archival specimens of Carnoy-fixed, paraffin-embedded brain tissue. The material consisted of 23 samples obtained during a rabies outbreak in Finland in 1988, and one sample isolated from a bat researcher who died of rabies in Finland in 1985. These results were compared with the original diagnoses performed on the fresh tissues. The immunofluorescence assay detected 100% (12/12) of the rabies-positive archival cases. A PCR assay designed to detect a 139-bp target near the 5' end of the rabies nucleoprotein gene also detected 100% (12/12) of the samples identified as positive in the fresh tissue specimens. A PCR assay designed to detect a 304-bp target spanning the 139-bp target of the first assay detected only 67% (8/12) of the original cases. No false positives were recorded. Both immunofluorescence detection of antigen and PCR detection of a short region of the nucleoprotein gene are useful in determining the rabies status of fixed, paraffin embedded (archival) material.
Notes
Erratum In: Zentralbl Veterinarmed [B] 1999 Sep;46(7):503
PubMed ID
10337236 View in PubMed
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Animal-borne diseases in Alaska and their public health significance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2022
Source
Pages 254-259 in Proceedings of the 15th International Veterinary Congress, Stockholm, Aug. 9-15.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1953
Author
Rausch, R.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Pages 254-259 in Proceedings of the 15th International Veterinary Congress, Stockholm, Aug. 9-15.
Date
1953
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Echinococcus granulosus
Zoonosis
Trichinella spiralis
Diphyllobothrium spp.
Rabies
Pasteurella tularensis
Brucellosis
Animals
Humans
Parasites
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1690.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 843.
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An outbreak of rabies in northwest Canada, 1951-52.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293692
Source
Arct. Circ., 5:57.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1952
Author
Solman, V.E.F.
Source
Arct. Circ., 5:57.
Date
1952
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Rabies
Hydrophobia
Notes
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 871.
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192 records – page 1 of 20.