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[Algo-bacterial communities of the Kulunda steppe (Altai region, Russia) soda lakes].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262610
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2015 Jan-Feb;84(1):107-19
Publication Type
Article
Author
O S Samylina
F V Sapozhnikov
O Iu Gainanova
A V Riabova
M A Nikitin
D Iu Sorokin
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2015 Jan-Feb;84(1):107-19
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chlorophyta - classification - genetics - ultrastructure
Cyanobacteria - classification - genetics - ultrastructure
DNA, Algal - analysis - genetics
DNA, Bacterial - analysis - genetics
Diatoms - classification - genetics - ultrastructure
Grassland
Lakes - chemistry - microbiology
Molecular Typing
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 18S - genetics
Salinity
Siberia
Water Microbiology
Abstract
The composition and macroscopic structure of the floating oxygenic phototrophic communities from Kulunda steppe soda lakes (Petukhovskoe sodovoe, Tanatara VI, and Gorchiny 3) was described based on the data of the 2011 and 2012 expeditions (Winogradsky Institute of Microbiology). The algo-bacterial community with a green alga Ctenocladus circinnatus as an edificator was the typical one. Filamentous Geitlerinema sp. and Nodosilinea sp. were the dominant cyanobacteria. Apart from C. circinnatus, the algological component of the community contained unicellular green algae Dunaliella viridis and cf. Chlorella minutissima, as well as diatoms (Anomeoneis sphaerophora, Brchysira brebissonii, Brachysira zellensis, Mastogloia pusilla var. subcapitata, Nitzschia amphibia, Nitzschia communis, and Nitzschia sp.1). The latter have not been previously identified in the lakes under study. In all lakes, a considerable increase in salinity was found to result in changes in the composition and macroscopic structure of algo-bacterial communities.
PubMed ID
25916153 View in PubMed
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Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal community divergence within a common host plant in two different soils in a subarctic Aeolian sand area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263039
Source
Mycorrhiza. 2014 Oct;24(7):539-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Gaia Francini
Minna Männistö
Vilhelmiina Alaoja
Minna-Maarit Kytöviita
Source
Mycorrhiza. 2014 Oct;24(7):539-50
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Biota
Cluster analysis
DNA, Fungal - chemistry - genetics
DNA, Plant - chemistry - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal - chemistry - genetics
Lipids - analysis
Molecular Sequence Data
Mycelium - chemistry
Mycorrhizae - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Phylogeny
Plant Roots - microbiology
Poaceae - microbiology
RNA, Ribosomal, 18S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Soil Microbiology
Abstract
There is rising awareness that different arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have different autoecology and occupy different soil niches and that the benefits they provide to the host plant are dependent on plant-AM fungus combination. However, the role and community composition of AM fungi in succession are not well known and the northern latitudes remain poorly investigated ecosystems. We studied AM fungal communities in the roots of the grass Deschampsia flexuosa in two different, closely located, successional stages in a northern Aeolian sand area. The AM fungal taxa richness in planta was estimated by cloning and sequencing small subunit ribosomal RNA genes. AM colonization, shoot d (13)C signature, and %N and %C were measured. Soil microbial community structure and AM fungal mycelium abundance were estimated using phospholipid (PLFA) and neutral lipid (NLFA) analyses. The two successional stages were characterized by distinct plant, microbial, and fungal communities. AM fungal species richness was very low in both the early and late successional stages. AM frequency in D. flexuosa roots was higher in the early successional stage than in the late one. The AM fungal taxa retrieved belonged to the genera generally adapted to Arctic or extreme environments. AM fungi seemed to be important in the early stage of the succession, suggesting that AM fungi may help plants to better cope with the harsh environmental conditions, especially in an early successional stage with more extreme environmental fluctuations.
PubMed ID
24687606 View in PubMed
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Babesia genotypes in Haemaphysalis concinna collected from birds in Hungary reflect phylogeographic connections with Siberia and the Far East.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290398
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2017 06; 8(4):666-670
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2017
Author
Barbara Flaisz
Kinga M Sulyok
Dávid Kováts
Jeno Kontschán
Tibor Csörgo
Ármin Csipak
Miklós Gyuranecz
Sándor Hornok
Author Affiliation
Department of Parasitology and Zoology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary.
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2017 06; 8(4):666-670
Date
06-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animal Migration
Animals
Babesia - genetics
Babesiosis - epidemiology - parasitology
Bird Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology
Birds
Genotype
Hungary - epidemiology
Ixodidae - growth & development - microbiology - physiology
Larva - growth & development - microbiology - physiology
Nymph - growth & development - microbiology - physiology
Phylogeography
RNA, Protozoan - genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 18S - genetics
Abstract
Haemaphysalis concinna is the second most common tick species attaching to birds in Hungary. Recently, Babesia genotypes, found in Siberia and the Far East, have been detected in this tick species collected from the vegetation in Hungary and Slovakia. The aim of this study was to molecularly investigate if these piroplasms also occur in H. concinna carried by migratory birds, which might explain their occurrence in the western Palaearctic. During a 2-year period, 321 H. concinna larvae and nymphs were collected from 121 passerine birds (of 19 species) in Hungary. These were molecularly investigated for the presence of piroplasm DNA with PCR and sequencing. The prevalence of PCR positive ticks was 15.9% (51 out of 321). Piroplasm PCR positivity of H. concinna ticks was significantly more frequent during the summer and autumn compared to spring, suggesting that migratory birds arriving in Hungary from the north or north east are the most important in the dispersal of H. concinna-associated piroplasms. Three genotypes, i.e. Babesia sp. "Irk-Hc133", "Irk-Hc130" (originally found in Irkutsk, Siberia) and "Kh-Hc222" (originally found in Khabarovsk, Far East) were detected. Phylogenetically all these belonged to the group formed by Babesia spp. of ruminants. Four bird species, which had 14-60% prevalence of PCR positive ticks, are known to be associated with northeast to southwest autumn migration. In conclusion, the presence of Central and East Asian Babesia genotypes in Central Europe are most likely related to bird species with known eastern migratory habit and/or phylogenetically substantiated connections between their eastern and western Eurasian populations.
PubMed ID
28499722 View in PubMed
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Bacterial and fungal community structure in Arctic tundra tussock and shrub soils.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95659
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2007 Feb;59(2):428-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Wallenstein Matthew David
McMahon Shawna
Schimel Joshua
Author Affiliation
Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106, USA. wallenstein@lifesci.ucsb.edu
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2007 Feb;59(2):428-35
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Bacteria - classification - growth & development
Cyperaceae - growth & development
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
DNA, Fungal - analysis
Ecosystem
Freezing
Fungi - classification - growth & development
Molecular Sequence Data
Proteobacteria - classification - growth & development
RNA, Ribosomal, 18S - genetics
Seasons
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Soil - analysis
Soil Microbiology
Trees - growth & development
Abstract
Fungal and bacterial community structure in tussock, intertussock and shrub organic and mineral soils at Toolik Lake, Alaska were evaluated. Community structure was examined by constructing clone libraries of partial 16S and 18S rRNA genes. The soil communities were sampled at the end of the growing season in August 2004 and just after the soils thawed in June 2005. The communities differed greatly between vegetation types, although tussock and intertussock soil communities were very similar at the phyla level. The communities were relatively stable between sample dates at the phyla and subphyla levels, but differed significantly at finer phylogenetic scales. Tussock and intertussock bacterial communities were dominated by Acidobacteria, while shrub soils were dominated by Proteobacteria. These results appear consistent with previous work demonstrating that shrub soils contain an active, bioavailable C fraction, while tussock soils are dominated by more recalcitrant substrates. Tussock fungi communities had higher proportions of Ascomycota than shrub soils, while Zygomycota were more abundant in shrub soils. Recent documentation of increasing shrub abundance in the Arctic suggests that soil microbial communities and their functioning are likely to be altered by climate change.
PubMed ID
17313585 View in PubMed
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Biogeographic patterns in below-ground diversity in New York City's Central Park are similar to those observed globally.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267235
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2014 Nov 22;281(1795)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-22-2014
Author
Kelly S Ramirez
Jonathan W Leff
Albert Barberán
Scott Thomas Bates
Jason Betley
Thomas W Crowther
Eugene F Kelly
Emily E Oldfield
E Ashley Shaw
Christopher Steenbock
Mark A Bradford
Diana H Wall
Noah Fierer
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2014 Nov 22;281(1795)
Date
Nov-22-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biodiversity
Molecular Sequence Data
New York City
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics - metabolism
RNA, Ribosomal, 18S - genetics - metabolism
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Soil - parasitology
Soil Microbiology
Abstract
Soil biota play key roles in the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, however, compared to our knowledge of above-ground plant and animal diversity, the biodiversity found in soils remains largely uncharacterized. Here, we present an assessment of soil biodiversity and biogeographic patterns across Central Park in New York City that spanned all three domains of life, demonstrating that even an urban, managed system harbours large amounts of undescribed soil biodiversity. Despite high variability across the Park, below-ground diversity patterns were predictable based on soil characteristics, with prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities exhibiting overlapping biogeographic patterns. Further, Central Park soils harboured nearly as many distinct soil microbial phylotypes and types of soil communities as we found in biomes across the globe (including arctic, tropical and desert soils). This integrated cross-domain investigation highlights that the amount and patterning of novel and uncharacterized diversity at a single urban location matches that observed across natural ecosystems spanning multiple biomes and continents.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25274366 View in PubMed
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Chloromonas arctica sp. nov., a psychrotolerant alga from snow in the High Arctic (Chlamydomonadales, Chlorophyta).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290202
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2018 Mar; 68(3):851-859
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Dovile Barcyte
Ladislav Hodac
Linda Nedbalová
Josef Elster
Author Affiliation
1?Department of Ecology, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Vinicná 7, Prague 2, 128 44, Czech Republic.
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2018 Mar; 68(3):851-859
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
DNA, Algal - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal Spacer - genetics
Phylogeny
Plastids - genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 18S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Snow
Svalbard
Volvocida - classification - genetics
Abstract
With the advent of molecular phylogenetic methods, it has become possible to assess the bioversity of snow algae more accurately. In this study, we focused on a morphological, ultrastructural and taxonomic description of a new Chloromonas-like alga isolated from snow in the High Arctic (Svalbard). Light and transmission electron microscopy revealed broad ellipsoidal or ellipsoidal-cylindrical, occasionally spherical cells with a chloroplast without a pyrenoid, an inconspicuous eyespot and a papilla. The size difference and the aforementioned morphological traits clearly distinguished the alga from its closest counterparts within the genus Chloromonas. Moreover, we were able to cultivate the alga at both 5 and 20?°C, revealing the psychrotolerant nature of the strain. Phylogenetic analyses of the plastid rbcL and nuclear 18S rRNA gene showed that the alga is nested within a clade containing a number of psychrotolerant strains within the Chloromonadinia phylogroup (Chlorophyceae). In the rbcL phylogeny, the alga formed an independent lineage, sister to the freshwater species Chloromonas paraserbinowii. Comparisons of secondary structure models of a highly variable ITS2 rDNA marker showed support for a distinct species identity for the new strain. The ITS2 secondary structure of the new isolate differed from the closest matches 'Chlamydomonas' gerloffii and Choloromonas reticulata by three and five compensatory base changes, respectively. Considering the morphological and molecular differences from its closest relatives, a new psychrotolerant species from the Arctic, Choromonas arctica sp. nov., is proposed.
PubMed ID
29458669 View in PubMed
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Clydonella sawyeri n. sp. (Amoebozoa, Vannellida): Morphological and molecular study and a re-definition of the genus Clydonella Sawyer, 1975.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291122
Source
Eur J Protistol. 2018 Apr; 63:62-71
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Alexander Kudryavtsev
Ekaterina Volkova
Author Affiliation
Department of Invertebrate Zoology, Faculty of Biology, St. Petersburg State University, Universitetskaya nab. 7/9, 199034 St. Petersburg, Russia; Laboratory of Parasitic Worms and Protistology, Zoological Institute RAS, Universitetskaya nab. 1, 199034 St. Petersburg, Russia. Electronic address: alexander.kudryavtsev@spbu.ru.
Source
Eur J Protistol. 2018 Apr; 63:62-71
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Amoebozoa - classification - genetics - ultrastructure
Bays - parasitology
Electron Transport Complex IV - genetics
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 18S - genetics
Russia
Saline Waters
Species Specificity
Abstract
We isolated and described a brackish-water amoeba, Clydonella sawyeri n. sp. (Amoebozoa, Vannellida), from the littoral habitat in Kandalaksha Bay (The White Sea, northwestern Russia). Morphology of this amoeba corresponds to the initially proposed diagnosis of the genus Clydonella Sawyer, 1975, although it is sufficiently different from other described species of this genus to warrant a distinct species designation. Phylogenetic analysis based on the small-subunit rRNA gene shows that this species is closely related to the two previously studied ATCC strains identified as Clydonella sp., for which only ultrastructural and molecular data were published. Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene sequence of the studied species was for the first time obtained for Clydonella. Analysis of this marker shows that this genus belongs to Vannellida and is separated from the other vannellids sampled to date. Phylogenetic analysis of the concatenated SSU rRNA and COI genes dataset yields the best resolved position of Clydonella compared to both markers when analysed separately. Based on the data presented we finally link light microscopic, ultrastructural and molecular data in a description of a single strain, which allows a refinement of the diagnosis of the genus Clydonella.
PubMed ID
29471268 View in PubMed
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Co-infection of Nucleospora cyclopteri (Microsporidia) and Kudoa islandica (Myxozoa) in farmed lumpfish, Cyclopterus lumpus L., in Norway: a case report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278712
Source
J Fish Dis. 2016 Apr;39(4):411-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
M. Alarcón
E. Thoen
T T Poppe
G. Bornø
S N Mohammad
H. Hansen
Source
J Fish Dis. 2016 Apr;39(4):411-8
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Apansporoblastina - classification - genetics - physiology
Ciliophora - physiology
Ciliophora Infections - pathology
Coinfection
Fish Diseases - parasitology - pathology
Fisheries
Gills - parasitology - pathology
Kidney - parasitology - pathology
Muscle, Skeletal - parasitology
Myxozoa - classification - genetics - physiology
Norway
Parasitic Diseases, Animal - parasitology - pathology
Perciformes - parasitology
RNA, Ribosomal, 18S - genetics
Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid
Abstract
This study describes a co-infection of Kudoa islandica (Myxozoa) and Nucleospora cyclopteri (Microsporida) in farmed lumpfish, Cyclopterus lumpus L., in Norway. Several other parasites (Cryptocotyle sp., protozoan ciliates and Gyrodactylus sp.) were also found in gills. In June 2013, the mortality in a farmed lumpfish population increased to 65%. Lumpfish showed erratic swimming behaviour and loss of weight. At necropsy, nodules in the kidney were the only visible lesions. Histologically, all fish showed severe changes with gill inflammation and necrosis in the spleen, kidney and liver. Haemorrhages and necrosis were observed in some hearts. Intracellular microsporidians associated with the lesions were detected in most organs using histological examination and Calcofluor White. Kudoa spores were diagnosed in the skeletal muscle, but no inflammatory response was associated with the presence of the plasmodia. Comparison of 18S ribosomal DNA sequences showed 100% similarity to Kudoa islandica and Nucleospora cyclopteri. Kudoa islandica and N. cyclopteri have previously been described associated with lesions in wild lumpfish in Iceland. In the present case, N. cyclopteri is believed to be the main cause of systemic pathology. This is the first description of K. islandica and N. cyclopteri causing pathology in farmed lumpfish in Norway.
PubMed ID
25865243 View in PubMed
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Co-occurrence Networks Among Bacteria and Microbial Eukaryotes of Lake Baikal During a Spring Phytoplankton Bloom.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297729
Source
Microb Ecol. 2019 Jan; 77(1):96-109
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Ivan S Mikhailov
Yulia R Zakharova
Yuri S Bukin
Yuri P Galachyants
Darya P Petrova
Maria V Sakirko
Yelena V Likhoshway
Author Affiliation
Limnological Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Ulan-Batorskaya, Irkutsk, Russia, 664033. ivanmikhai@gmail.com.
Source
Microb Ecol. 2019 Jan; 77(1):96-109
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Bacteria - classification - genetics
Bacterial Physiological Phenomena
Cluster analysis
Ecosystem
Eukaryota - classification - physiology
Fresh Water
Lakes - microbiology
Microbiota
Phylogeny
Phytoplankton - growth & development
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 18S - genetics
Seasons
Abstract
The pelagic zone of Lake Baikal is an ecological niche where phytoplankton bloom causes increasing microbial abundance in spring which plays a key role in carbon turnover in the freshwater lake. Co-occurrence patterns revealed among different microbes can be applied to predict interactions between the microbes and environmental conditions in the ecosystem. We used 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA and 18S rRNA genes to study bacterial and microbial eukaryotic communities and their co-occurrence patterns at the pelagic zone of Lake Baikal during a spring phytoplankton bloom. We found that microbes within one domain mostly correlated positively with each other and are highly interconnected. The highly connected taxa in co-occurrence networks were operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Alphaproteobacteria, and autotrophic and unclassified Eukaryota which might be analogous to microbial keystone taxa. Constrained correspondence analysis revealed the relationships of bacterial and microbial eukaryotic communities with geographical location.
Notes
ErratumIn: Microb Ecol. 2019 Jan 5;: PMID 30610256
PubMed ID
29882155 View in PubMed
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Cytogenetic Characterization of Eight Odonata Species Originating from the Curonian Spit (the Baltic Sea, Russia) Using C-Banding and FISH with 18S rDNA and Telomeric (TTAGG)n Probes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290343
Source
Cytogenet Genome Res. 2017; 153(3):147-157
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Valentina G Kuznetsova
Anna Maryanska-Nadachowska
Nazar A Shapoval
Boris A Anokhin
Anatoly P Shapoval
Author Affiliation
Department of Karyosystematics, Zoological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, Russia.
Source
Cytogenet Genome Res. 2017; 153(3):147-157
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Base Sequence
Chromosome Banding
Cytogenetic Analysis - methods
DNA Probes
Geography
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Karyotype
Male
Oceans and Seas
Odonata - classification - genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 18S - genetics
Russia
Species Specificity
Telomere - genetics
Abstract
We studied the karyotypes of 8 dragonfly species originating from the Curonian Spit (the Baltic Sea, Russia) using C-banding and FISH with 18S rDNA and "insect" telomeric (TTAGG)n probes. Our results show that Leucorrhinia rubicunda, Libellula depressa, L. quadrimaculata, Orthetrum cancellatum, Sympetrum danae, and S. vulgatum from the family Libellulidae, as well as Cordulia aenea and Epitheca bimaculata from the family Corduliidae share 2n = 25 (24 + X) in males, with a minute pair of m-chromosomes being present in every karyotype except for that of C. aenea. Major rDNA clusters are located on one of the large pairs of autosomes in all the species. No hybridization signals were obtained by FISH with the (TTAGG)n probe in the examined species with the only exception of S. vulgatum. In this species, clear signals were detected at the ends of almost all chromosomes. This finding raises the possibility that in Odonata the canonical "insect" (TTAGG)n telomeric repeat is in fact present but in very low copy number and is consequently difficult to detect by in situ hybridization. We conclude that more work needs to be done to answer questions about the organization of telomeres in this very ancient and thus phylogenetically important insect order.
PubMed ID
29339662 View in PubMed
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54 records – page 1 of 6.