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Active Microbial Communities Inhabit Sulphate-Methane Interphase in Deep Bedrock Fracture Fluids in Olkiluoto, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274433
Source
Biomed Res Int. 2015;2015:979530
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Malin Bomberg
Mari Nyyssönen
Petteri Pitkänen
Anne Lehtinen
Merja Itävaara
Source
Biomed Res Int. 2015;2015:979530
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteria - genetics - metabolism
Base Sequence
Ecosystem
Finland
Geologic Sediments - microbiology
Groundwater - microbiology
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Methane - metabolism
Phylogeny
RNA, Messenger - genetics - metabolism
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sulfates - metabolism
Abstract
Active microbial communities of deep crystalline bedrock fracture water were investigated from seven different boreholes in Olkiluoto (Western Finland) using bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA, dsrB, and mcrA gene transcript targeted 454 pyrosequencing. Over a depth range of 296-798?m below ground surface the microbial communities changed according to depth, salinity gradient, and sulphate and methane concentrations. The highest bacterial diversity was observed in the sulphate-methane mixing zone (SMMZ) at 250-350?m depth, whereas archaeal diversity was highest in the lowest boundaries of the SMMZ. Sulphide-oxidizing e-proteobacteria (Sulfurimonas sp.) dominated in the SMMZ and ?-proteobacteria (Pseudomonas spp.) below the SMMZ. The active archaeal communities consisted mostly of ANME-2D and Thermoplasmatales groups, although Methermicoccaceae, Methanobacteriaceae, and Thermoplasmatales (SAGMEG, TMG) were more common at 415-559?m depth. Typical indicator microorganisms for sulphate-methane transition zones in marine sediments, such as ANME-1 archaea, a-, ß- and d-proteobacteria, JS1, Actinomycetes, Planctomycetes, Chloroflexi, and MBGB Crenarchaeota were detected at specific depths. DsrB genes were most numerous and most actively transcribed in the SMMZ while the mcrA gene concentration was highest in the deep methane rich groundwater. Our results demonstrate that active and highly diverse but sparse and stratified microbial communities inhabit the Fennoscandian deep bedrock ecosystems.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26425566 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antepartum glucocorticoid therapy suppresses human placental xenobiotic and steroid metabolizing enzymes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58787
Source
Placenta. 2000 Mar-Apr;21(2-3):241-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
P. Paakki
P. Kirkinen
H. Helin
O. Pelkonen
H. Raunio
M. Pasanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Oulu, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Placenta. 2000 Mar-Apr;21(2-3):241-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
7-Alkoxycoumarin O-Dealkylase - metabolism
Adult
Aromatase - genetics - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 - metabolism
Dexamethasone - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Glucocorticoids - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Obstetric Labor, Premature - drug therapy
Placenta - drug effects - enzymology
Pregnancy
RNA, Messenger - genetics - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - prevention & control
Steroids - metabolism
Xenobiotics - metabolism
Abstract
We investigated the effects of maternal gestational corticosteroid therapy on placental xenobiotic and steroid metabolizing enzymes at term in 20 glucocorticoid/betamethasone treated (with various doses) and control (n=10) women. A single dose of betamethasone (12 mg i.m. twice at a 24-h interval) was given to 15 mothers at risk of preterm delivery to prevent respiratory syndrome in their premature newborns. Five mothers were treated more than once. The gestation time in mothers receiving the glucocorticoid therapy varied from 22-38 gestational weeks.Compared with controls, a significant decrease in placental aromatase activity (53.6+/-18.0 pmol/mg/min versus 119+/-30 pmol/mg/min, P=0.0007) and placental CYP19 mRNA content (by 50 per cent ) was observed in mothers treated with glucocorticoids. Also the formation of androstenedione (13.2+/-8.1 pmol/mg/min, steroids versus 30.03+/-5.2 pmol/mg/min, controls, P
PubMed ID
10736248 View in PubMed
Less detail

Apelin, the novel endogenous ligand of the orphan receptor APJ, regulates cardiac contractility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9913
Source
Circ Res. 2002 Sep 6;91(5):434-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-6-2002
Author
István Szokodi
Pasi Tavi
Gábor Földes
Sari Voutilainen-Myllylä
Mika Ilves
Heikki Tokola
Sampsa Pikkarainen
Jarkko Piuhola
Jaana Rysä
Miklós Tóth
Heikki Ruskoaho
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Circ Res. 2002 Sep 6;91(5):434-40
Date
Sep-6-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Genetically Modified
Calcium Channels - physiology
Carrier Proteins - genetics - metabolism - pharmacology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Endothelin-1 - pharmacology
Gene Expression Regulation
Heart Ventricles - cytology - drug effects - physiology
In Vitro
Isoproterenol - pharmacology
Ligands
Male
Membrane Potentials - drug effects
Myocardial Contraction - drug effects
Peptides - pharmacology
Potassium Channels - physiology
RNA, Messenger - genetics - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred SHR
Rats, Inbred WKY
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Receptors, Dopamine D2 - genetics - metabolism
Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sodium-Calcium Exchanger - metabolism
Sodium-Hydrogen Antiporter - metabolism
Stress, mechanical
Time Factors
Abstract
The orphan receptor APJ and its recently identified endogenous ligand, apelin, exhibit high levels of mRNA expression in the heart. However, the functional importance of apelin in the cardiovascular system is not known. In isolated perfused rat hearts, infusion of apelin (0.01 to 10 nmol/L) induced a dose-dependent positive inotropic effect (EC50: 33.1+/-1.5 pmol/L). Moreover, preload-induced increase in dP/dt(max) was significantly augmented (P
PubMed ID
12215493 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between dietary patterns and gene expression profiles of healthy men and women: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116433
Source
Nutr J. 2013;12:24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Annie Bouchard-Mercier
Ann-Marie Paradis
Iwona Rudkowska
Simone Lemieux
Patrick Couture
Marie-Claude Vohl
Author Affiliation
Institute of Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods-INAF, Laval University, 2440 Hochelaga Blvd, Quebec G1V 0A6, Canada.
Source
Nutr J. 2013;12:24
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood pressure
Cereals
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - methods
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Gene Expression Regulation
Humans
Leukocytes, Mononuclear - metabolism
Male
Meat products
Middle Aged
Nutrigenomics - methods
Nutrition Assessment
Quebec
Questionnaires
RNA, Messenger - genetics - metabolism
Transcriptome - physiology
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
Diet regulates gene expression profiles by several mechanisms. The objective of this study was to examine gene expression in relation with dietary patterns.
Two hundred and fifty four participants from the greater Quebec City metropolitan area were recruited. Two hundred and ten participants completed the study protocol. Dietary patterns were derived from a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) by factor analysis. For 30 participants (in fasting state), RNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and expression levels of 47,231 mRNA transcripts were assessed using the Illumina Human-6 v3 Expression BeadChips®. Microarray data was pre-processed with Flexarray software and analysed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA).
Two dietary patterns were identified. The Prudent dietary pattern was characterised by high intakes of vegetables, fruits, whole grain products and low intakes of refined grain products and the Western dietary pattern, by high intakes of refined grain products, desserts, sweets and processed meats. When individuals with high scores for the Prudent dietary pattern where compared to individuals with low scores, 2,083 transcripts were differentially expressed in men, 1,136 transcripts in women and 59 transcripts were overlapping in men and women. For the Western dietary pattern, 1,021 transcripts were differentially expressed in men with high versus low scores, 1,163 transcripts in women and 23 transcripts were overlapping in men and women. IPA reveals that genes differentially expressed for both patterns were present in networks related to the immune and/or inflammatory response, cancer and cardiovascular diseases.
Gene expression profiles were different according to dietary patterns, which probably modulate the risk of chronic diseases.
NCT: NCT01343342.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23398686 View in PubMed
Less detail

Azidothymidine and cisplatin increase p14ARF expression in OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cell line.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81725
Source
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2006 Oct 1;216(1):89-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2006
Author
Vaskivuo Liisa
Rysä Jaana
Koivuperä Johanna
Myllynen Päivi
Vaskivuo Tommi
Chvalova Katerina
Serpi Raisa
Savolainen Eeva-Riitta
Puistola Ulla
Vähäkangas Kirsi
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Oulu, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland.
Source
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2006 Oct 1;216(1):89-97
Date
Oct-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Agents - pharmacology
Apoptosis - drug effects
Blotting, Western
Cell Line, Tumor
Cisplatin - pharmacology
DNA-Binding Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic - drug effects
HT29 Cells
Humans
Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Ovarian Neoplasms - genetics - metabolism - pathology
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2 - genetics - metabolism
RNA, Messenger - genetics - metabolism
Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors - pharmacology
Taxoids - pharmacology
Transcription Factors - genetics - metabolism
Tumor Suppressor Protein p14ARF - genetics - metabolism
Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 - genetics - metabolism
Zidovudine - pharmacology
ras Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
p14(ARF) tumor suppressor protein regulates p53 by interfering with mdm2-p53 interaction. p14(ARF) is activated in response to oncogenic stimuli but little is known of the responses of endogenous p14(ARF) to different types of cellular stress or DNA damage. Azidothymidine (AZT) is being tested in several clinical trials as an enhancer of anticancer chemotherapy. However, the knowledge of the relationship between AZT and cellular pathways, e.g. p53 pathway, is very limited. In this study, we show that AZT, cisplatin (CDDP) and docetaxel (DTX) all induce unique molecular responses in OVCAR-3 ovarian carcinoma cells carrying a mutated p53, while in A2780, ovarian carcinoma and MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells with wild type p53, all of these drugs cause similar p53 responses. We found that endogenous p14(ARF) protein in OVCAR-3 cells is down-regulated by DTX but induced by AZT and a short CDDP pulse treatment. In HT-29 colon carcinoma cells with a mutated p53, all treatments down-regulated p14(ARF) protein. Both CDDP and AZT increased the expression of p14ARF mRNA in OVCAR-3 cells. Differences in cell death induced by these drugs did not explain the differences in protein and mRNA expressions. No increase in the level of either c-Myc or H-ras oncoproteins was seen in OVCAR-3 cells after AZT or CDDP-treatment. These results suggest that p14(ARF) can respond to DNA damage without oncogene activation in cell lines without functional p53.
PubMed ID
16797627 View in PubMed
Less detail

Brown fat-specific mitochondrial uncoupling protein in adipose tissues of newborn reindeer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6898
Source
Am J Physiol. 1991 Jun;260(6 Pt 2):R1229-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
P. Soppela
M. Nieminen
S. Saarela
J S Keith
J N Morrison
F. Macfarlane
P. Trayhurn
Author Affiliation
Reindeer Research, Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Rovaniemi.
Source
Am J Physiol. 1991 Jun;260(6 Pt 2):R1229-34
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry - metabolism
Aging - metabolism
Animals
Animals, Newborn - metabolism
Base Sequence
Carrier Proteins
DNA Probes
Immunoblotting
Membrane Proteins - analysis - genetics - metabolism
Molecular Sequence Data
RNA, Messenger - genetics - metabolism
Reindeer - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Reindeer inhabit a severe arctic or subarctic environment, with the young born in early spring under adverse weather conditions. The extreme northern climate imposes a major thermal challenge to the newborn, and in the present study we have examined fetal, neonatal, and young (from 2 wk before birth to 16 mo postpartum) semidomesticated reindeer from northern Finland for the presence of thermogenic brown adipose tissue. Adipose tissues were removed, mitochondria were prepared, and the proteins were separated by molecular weight and blotted onto nitrocellulose membranes. The membranes were then probed for the presence of the 32,000-relative molecular weight mitochondrial uncoupling protein (UCP) unique to brown fat by use of a rabbit anti-(ground squirrel UCP) serum. Immunoreactivity at the molecular weight characteristic of UCP was present in perirenal, abdominal, inter(pre)scapular, sternal, intralumbar, vertebral, tracheal, inguinal, and omental-mesenteral adipose tissues of newborn reindeer (0-2 days of age). No immunoreactivity was detected in coronary adipose tissue. UCP was found at high levels in interscapular and perirenal adipose tissues of fetal reindeer at 2 wk before birth. Although the protein was present during the first few days postpartum, little immunoreactivity was found at 1 mo of age, and none was evident by 2 mo. UCP and its mRNA were also apparent in perirenal adipose tissue of the newborn of another species of Cervidae, the red deer. It is concluded, on the basis of the immunologic identification of UCP, that most adipose tissues of newborn reindeer represent functional brown fat but that there is a subsequent conversion to white adipose tissue by the 2nd mo of life.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
2058749 View in PubMed
Less detail

cDNA analyses of CAPN3 enhance mutation detection and reveal a low prevalence of LGMD2A patients in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158292
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2008 Aug;16(8):935-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Morten Duno
Marie-Louise Sveen
Marianne Schwartz
John Vissing
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Genetics, University of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. mdunoe@rh.dk
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2008 Aug;16(8):935-40
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blotting, Western
Calpain - genetics
DNA Mutational Analysis
DNA, Complementary - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Genotype
Humans
Muscle Proteins - genetics
Muscular Dystrophies, Limb-Girdle - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Mutation - genetics
Phenotype
Prevalence
RNA, Messenger - genetics - metabolism
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Abstract
Calpainopathy or limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is generally recognized as the most prevalent form of recessive LGMD and is caused by mutations in the CAPN3 gene. Out of a cohort of 119 patients fulfilling clinical criteria for LGMD2, referred to our neuromuscular clinic, 46 were suspected to have LGMD2A, based on western blot results. Four of these patients were shown to have LGMD2I upon molecular analysis, whereas 16 of the remaining 42 patients harbored mutations in CAPN3 by both direct genomic sequencing and cDNA analyses. In 10 patients, we identified both mutant alleles. In three other, only one heterozygous mutation could be identified on the genomic level; however, CAPN3 cDNA analyses demonstrated homozygosity for the mutant allele, indicating the presence of an unidentified allele that somehow compromise correct CAPN3 RNA processing. In the three remaining patients, only a single heterozygous mutation could be identified both at the genomic level and on full-length CAPN3 cDNA. All three patients exhibited a highly abnormal western blot for calpain-3 and clinical characteristics of LGMD2A. Only three of the genetically confirmed LGMD2A patients were of Danish origin, indicating a five- to sixfold lower prevalence in Denmark compared to other European countries. A total of 16 different CAPN3 mutations were identified, of which 5 were novel. The present study demonstrates the value of cDNA analysis for CAPN3 in LGMD2A patients and indicates that calpainopathy is an uncommon cause of LGMD in the Denmark.
PubMed ID
18337726 View in PubMed
Less detail

C-fos gene expression in spontaneously transformed mouse fibroblast cell lines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24986
Source
Nucleic Acids Symp Ser. 1991;(24):315
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991

Collagenase-2 (matrix metalloproteinase-8) plays a protective role in tongue cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87161
Source
Br J Cancer. 2008 Feb 26;98(4):766-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-26-2008
Author
Korpi J T
Kervinen V.
Mäklin H.
Väänänen A.
Lahtinen M.
Läärä E.
Ristimäki A.
Thomas G.
Ylipalosaari M.
Aström P.
Lopez-Otin C.
Sorsa T.
Kantola S.
Pirilä E.
Salo T.
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2008 Feb 26;98(4):766-75
Date
Feb-26-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
4-Nitroquinoline-1-oxide - toxicity
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Blotting, Western
Carcinogens - toxicity
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - chemically induced - enzymology - prevention & control
Estrogen Receptor alpha - metabolism
Estrogen Receptor beta - metabolism
Female
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Male
Matrix Metalloproteinase 8 - physiology
Mice
Mice, Knockout
Middle Aged
Mouth Neoplasms - enzymology - pathology
RNA, Messenger - genetics - metabolism
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Tongue Neoplasms - enzymology - pathology - prevention & control
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis
Abstract
Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue is the most common cancer in the oral cavity and has a high mortality rate. A total of 90 mobile tongue SCC samples were analysed for Bryne's malignancy scores, microvascular density, and thickness of the SCC sections. In addition, the staining pattern of cyclooxygenase-2, alphavbeta6 integrin, the laminin-5 gamma2-chain, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2, -7, -8, -9, -20, and -28 were analysed. The expression of MMP-8 (collagenase-2) was positively associated with improved survival of the patients and the tendency was particularly prominent in females. No sufficient evidence for a correlation with the clinical outcome was found for any other immunohistological marker. To test the protective role of MMP-8 in tongue carcinogenesis, MMP-8 knockout mice were used. MMP-8 deficient female mice developed tongue SCCs at a significantly higher incidence than wild-type mice exposed to carcinogen 4-Nitroquinoline-N-oxide. Consistently, oestrogen-induced MMP-8 expression in cultured HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells, and MMP-8 cleaved oestrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta. According to these data, we propose that, contrary to the role of most proteases produced by human carcinomas, MMP-8 has a protective, probably oestrogen-related role in the growth of mobile tongue SCCs.
PubMed ID
18253113 View in PubMed
Less detail

The common functional polymorphism -50G>T of the CYP2J2 gene is not associated with ischemic coronary and cerebrovascular events in an urban-based sample of Swedes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98813
Source
J Hypertens. 2010 Feb;28(2):294-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Cristiano Fava
Martina Montagnana
Peter Almgren
Bo Hedblad
Gunnar Engström
Göran Berglund
Pietro Minuz
Olle Melander
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, University Hospital of Malmö, Sweden. cristiano.fava@med.lu.se
Source
J Hypertens. 2010 Feb;28(2):294-9
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Base Sequence
Blood Pressure - genetics
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - genetics
Cohort Studies
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System - genetics
DNA Primers - genetics
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
RNA, Messenger - genetics - metabolism
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology - genetics
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
BACKGROUND: CYP2J2 is responsible for the production of 5,6 8,9 11,12 and 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, vasodilator and anti-inflammatory substances. It is abundantly expressed in human heart and also present in kidney and vasculature. Carriers of a common polymorphism, the CYP2J2 -50G>T, rs890293, have reduced expression of CYP2J2 mRNA level in the heart putatively through the interference with a binding site for a transcription factor with consequently reduced circulating levels of CYP2J2 epoxygenase metabolites in vivo. AIM: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of this functional polymorphism on blood pressure (BP) levels, hypertension prevalence, and risk of incident cardiovascular events in middle-aged Swedes. METHODS: The CYP2J2 polymorphism was genotyped in 5740 participants of the cardiovascular cohort of the 'Malmö Diet and Cancer' study. The incidence of cardiovascular events (coronary events, n = 261; ischemic stroke, n = 185) was monitored over 10 years of follow-up. RESULTS: In the whole population the polymorphism had no effect on BP and hypertension prevalence and no interaction was found between the polymorphism and sex, age or body mass index. Before and after adjustment for major cardiovascular risk factors, the hazard ratio for incident ischemic stroke and coronary events was not significantly different in carriers of different genotypes. CONCLUSIONS: Our data do not support a major role for the CYP2J2 -50G>T variant in determining BP level and incident ischemic events. Other studies are needed to elucidate if other polymorphisms in the same gene could have a role in BP homeostasis or incidence of cardiovascular events.
PubMed ID
19851119 View in PubMed
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