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Aboriginal youth suicide in Quebec: the contribution of public policy for prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108699
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2013 Sep-Dec;36(5-6):399-405
Publication Type
Article
Author
Michel Tousignant
Livia Vitenti
Nathalie Morin
Author Affiliation
CRISE, University of Quebec in Montreal, Canada. Electronic address: tousignant.michel@uqam.ca.
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2013 Sep-Dec;36(5-6):399-405
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Crime
Databases, Factual
Female
Housing
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Public Policy
Qualitative Research
Quebec - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - ethnology - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The high rate of youth suicide in some First Nations villages of Northern Quebec is an important public health problem. Based on a six-year field study in three villages belonging to the Atikamekw and Anishinabe groups, this paper proposes changes in three areas of social policy that could contribute to prevention of youth suicide. These three areas are: youth protection, administration of justice, and housing. An argument is made first to adapt the youth protection law of Quebec and to give greater responsibility to communities in individual cases in order to prevent child placement outside the villages. Regarding the administration of justice, we suggest initiatives to encourage rapid prosecution of crimes on reserves and the adoption of an approach based on reconciliation between perpetrator and victim. Finally, we indicate how housing measures could help safeguard children's wellbeing given that overcrowding can contribute to suicide. The discussion also proposes that these three key changes in social policy could be relevant in other Aboriginal communities both within and outside of Quebec.
PubMed ID
23856179 View in PubMed
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Adrenomyeloneuropathy: report of a new mutation in a French Canadian female.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173849
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2005 May;32(2):261-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Annie Dionne
Denis Brunet
Alexander McCampbell
Nicolas Dupré
Author Affiliation
Départment des Sciences Neurologiques, CHAUQ-Hôpital Enfant-Jésus, McGill University, QC, Canada.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2005 May;32(2):261-3
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters - genetics
Adrenoleukodystrophy - genetics - metabolism - physiopathology
Amino Acid Sequence - genetics
Amino Acid Substitution - genetics
Chromosomes, Human, X - genetics
DNA Mutational Analysis
Diagnosis, Differential
Exons - genetics
Family Health
Female
Genetic Testing
Humans
Middle Aged
Mutation, Missense - genetics
Pedigree
Phenotype
Quebec - ethnology
Sex Factors
Abstract
X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a peroxisomial disorder caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene. Adrenomyeloneuropathy is the second most frequent phenotype (25-46%) of this disease and classically presents in adulthood with spastic paraparesis. Female heterozygotes can be symptomatic, but they are frequently misdiagnosed as having multiple sclerosis.
We report a novel missense mutation in the ABCD1 gene in a 47-year-old French-Canadian female with spastic paraparesis and no confirmed family history of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. The mutation is located on exon 1 and causes the amino acid substitution of a valine for an alanine in a region of the protein highly conserved between mouse and man.
Adrenomyeloneuropathy must be considered in the differential diagnosis of spastic paraparesis in men or women. This is an initial report of an ABCD1 gene mutation in the French-Canadian population, which should lead to the recognition of other cases in the future.
PubMed ID
16018167 View in PubMed
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Assessment of Canadian Cree infants' birth size using the WHO Child Growth Standards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139276
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2011 Jan-Feb;23(1):126-31
Publication Type
Article
Author
Noreen D Willows
Dia Sanou
Rhonda C Bell
Author Affiliation
Department of Agricultural, Food, and Nutritional Science, Agriculture/Forestry Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. noreen.willows@ualberta.ca
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2011 Jan-Feb;23(1):126-31
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Body Height - ethnology
Body Weight - ethnology
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Diabetes, Gestational - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Male
Obesity - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Quebec - ethnology
Reference Values
Software
World Health Organization
Abstract
The WHO Child Growth Standards (CGS) which were recently adopted by the Canadian Pediatric Society were used to assess the relative size of Cree newborns.
Birth weight, length, and head circumference, and growth indices of 2,127 Cree newborns were compared with the CGS. Maternal characteristics of pregnancy and infant birth outcomes were recorded and stratified by birth weight category.
Among Cree newborns, 2.4% were low birth weight (LBW) (+2SD from the WHO CGS median for weight-for-length-for-age, BMI-for-age and head circumference-for-age, respectively. The majority (53.4%) of pregnancies was complicated by obesity and 10.3% were complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Infants weighing 4,000-4,499 g had a comparable prevalence of operative delivery (15.4%) as infants weighing 2,500-3,999 g (13.7%). Infants weighing =4,500 g had the highest prevalence of birth injuries (14.0%) and being born to women whose pregnancies were complicated by GDM (20%).
Cree newborns were larger than newborns of the CGS. The appropriateness for Cree infants of defining low and high birth weight from the WHO CGS is uncertain and may lead to inaccurate prognosis of postnatal health.
PubMed ID
21080474 View in PubMed
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Ataxia-oculomotor apraxia 2 patients show no increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161721
Source
Neuromuscul Disord. 2007 Dec;17(11-12):968-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
S A Nahas
A. Duquette
K. Roddier
R A Gatti
B. Brais
Author Affiliation
UCLA School of Medicine, Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, Macdonald Research Laboratories, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
Source
Neuromuscul Disord. 2007 Dec;17(11-12):968-9
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Apraxias - diagnosis - genetics - immunology
Ataxia - diagnosis - genetics - immunology
Cell Line
Child
Colony-Forming Units Assay - methods
DNA Mutational Analysis
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Humans
Lymphocytes - physiology - radiation effects
Mutation - genetics
Neoplasms - diagnosis - genetics
Ocular Motility Disorders - diagnosis - genetics - immunology
Prognosis
Quebec - ethnology
RNA Helicases - genetics
Radiation, Ionizing
alpha-Fetoproteins - genetics
Abstract
Mutations in senataxin have been described recently in 24 cases of French-Canadian descent with ataxia-oculomotor apraxia 2. This recessive ataxia is associated with an elevation in alpha-fetoprotein as in ataxia-telangiectasia. Because ataxia-telangiectasia cells are highly radiosensitive, we used a colony survival assay to measure the radiosensitivity of lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from five French-Canadian patients with ataxia-oculomotor apraxia 2. Two were homozygous for the common French-Canadian L1976R SETX missense mutation; the three others were compound heterozygotes for the common mutation and three different missense mutations. Overall, lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from these cases did not show significant variation from a normal response to 1 Gray of ionizing radiation but the two patients who were homozygous for the common L1976R mutation fell in the intermediate or non-diagnostic range.
PubMed ID
17720498 View in PubMed
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Carriers of recessive WNK1/HSN2 mutations for hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 2 (HSAN2) are more sensitive to thermal stimuli.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152516
Source
J Neurosci. 2009 Feb 18;29(7):2162-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-18-2009
Author
Marco L Loggia
M Catherine Bushnell
Martine Tétreault
Isabelle Thiffault
Claude Bhérer
Nazma K Mohammed
Anil A Kuchinad
Audrey Laferrière
Marie-Josée Dicaire
Lina Loisel
Jeffrey S Mogil
Bernard Brais
Author Affiliation
Alan Edwards Centre for Research on Pain, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 2B2. marco@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu
Source
J Neurosci. 2009 Feb 18;29(7):2162-6
Date
Feb-18-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
DNA Mutational Analysis
Female
Gene Frequency - genetics
Genes, Recessive - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Genetic Testing
Genotype
Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathies - ethnology - genetics - metabolism
Humans
Hyperalgesia - genetics - metabolism - physiopathology
Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation - genetics
Nerve Tissue Proteins - genetics
Pain Threshold - physiology
Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases - genetics
Quebec - ethnology
Abstract
Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 2 (HSAN2) is a rare recessive genetic disorder characterized by severe sensory loss affecting the tactile, thermal and nociceptive modalities. Although heterozygous carriers of nonsense mutations in the HSN2 gene, called with-no-lysine(K)-1 (WNK1), do not develop the disease, historical and experimental evidence suggests that these individuals might perceive somatosensory stimuli differently from others. Using the method-of-limits, we assessed the thresholds for warmth detection, cool detection, heat pain and cold pain in 25 mutation carriers and 35 controls. In group analyses, carriers displayed significantly lower warmth (p
Notes
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Cites: Pain. 2003 Feb;101(3):213-912583863
Cites: Trends Microbiol. 2003 Sep;11(9):445-813678861
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 2004 May;74(5):1064-7315060842
Cites: Semin Neurol. 2003 Dec;23(4):381-9015088259
Cites: Ann Neurol. 2004 Oct;56(4):572-515455397
Cites: Arch Neurol. 1973 Jul;29(1):23-374351257
Cites: Arch Dermatol. 1962 Mar;85:325-3914007517
Cites: Neurology. 2005 May 24;64(10):1762-715911806
Cites: Neurology. 2006 Mar 14;66(5):748-5116534117
Cites: Neurology. 2006 Apr 25;66(8):1251-216636245
Cites: Neuromolecular Med. 2006;8(1-2):147-5816775373
Cites: J Hum Genet. 2006;51(10):905-816946995
Cites: Orphanet J Rare Dis. 2007;2:3917915006
Cites: J Clin Invest. 2008 Jul;118(7):2496-50518521183
PubMed ID
19228968 View in PubMed
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Clinical, electrophysiologic, and genetic study of non-dystrophic myotonia in French-Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158301
Source
Neuromuscul Disord. 2009 May;19(5):330-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Nicolas Dupré
Nicolas Chrestian
Jean-Pierre Bouchard
Elsa Rossignol
Denis Brunet
Damien Sternberg
Bernard Brais
Jean Mathieu
Jack Puymirat
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurological Sciences, CHAUQ (Enfant-Jésus), Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Quebec City, QC, Canada. nicdupre@aol.com
Source
Neuromuscul Disord. 2009 May;19(5):330-4
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chloride Channels - genetics
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
DNA Mutational Analysis
Exercise Tolerance - genetics
Female
Genetic Markers - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Genetic Testing
Genotype
Humans
Leg - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Weakness - genetics - physiopathology
Muscle, Skeletal - metabolism - pathology - physiopathology
Mutation - genetics
Myotonia - diagnosis - genetics - physiopathology
NAV1.4 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel
Quebec - ethnology
Sodium Channels - genetics
Tongue - physiopathology
Young Adult
Abstract
Thirty-three French-Canadian families with non-dystrophic myotonia were identified. Fifty subjects were recruited and submitted to a complete clinical, electrophysiologic and genetic evaluation. Thirteen mutations were identified in CLCN1 and five mutations were identified in SCN4A. Onset in the lower extremities, presence of tongue myotonia and transient weakness suggested recessive CLCN1 mutations. Lid myotonia, absence of hypertrophy and exacerbation with cold temperature suggested SCN4A mutations. Pain was not a feature of dominant CLCN1 mutations while it could be seen in the others, more frequently in SCN4A mutations. Warm up phenomenon, hand grip myotonia, percussion myotonia, lid lag and hormonal effects were not distinguishing features. Repetitive nerve stimulation and short exercise test showed either a large (>50%) or mild-moderate (10-50%) decrement with recessive CLCN1 mutations while they showed only mild or no decrement with dominant CLCN1 and SCN4A mutations. The French-Canadian population shows wide phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity in non-dystrophic myotonias.
PubMed ID
18337100 View in PubMed
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Communities being well for family well-being: Exploring the socio-ecological determinants of well-being in an Inuit community of Northern Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295886
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2018 02; 55(1):120-146
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2018
Author
Sarah L Fraser
Valérie Parent
Véronique Dupéré
Author Affiliation
Université de Montréal.
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2018 02; 55(1):120-146
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Family - ethnology
Female
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Quebec - ethnology
Residence Characteristics
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - ethnology
Abstract
Inuit communities of Canada experience many disparities in health and psychosocial context. Research in community psychology has shown associations between such socio-ecological factors and individual well-being. The objective of the study was to explore how community-level determinants of well-being influence family well-being in a northern community of Nunavik, Quebec. A total of 14 participants were interviewed. A thematic inductive analysis was conducted to extract community determinants of family well-being from the data. A system science approach was used to explore the associations between determinants and larger psychosocial dynamics. A community workshop was held to discuss the results and their meaning. A total of 25 determinants were coded, 16 of which were community-level. Community-level stressors were highly interrelated, whereas community supports were generally disconnected and superimposed on narratives of stressors. Participants spoke of desired supports. In their narratives, these supports were connected to a variety of determinants of well-being, suggesting the need to connect, redefine and support existing resources rather than simply add on new ones. We discuss intricate links between family and community well-being in small and geographically isolated communities.
PubMed ID
29299979 View in PubMed
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Correlates of health-care use: Inuit and Cree of northern Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2470
Source
Social Science and Medicine. 1990; 30(1):25-34.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
Thouez, J.-P.
Foggin, P.
Rannou, A.
Author Affiliation
University of Montreal
Source
Social Science and Medicine. 1990; 30(1):25-34.
Date
1990
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Kangirsuk
Quaqtaq
Salluit
Kuujjuaraapik
Inukjuaq
Povungnituk
Ivujivik
Kuujjuaq
Kangiqsujuaq
Aupaluk
Tasiujaq
Kangiqsualujjuaq
Akulivik
Health services
Health status
Age Factors
Attitude to Health
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant mortality
Quebec - ethnology
Sex Factors
Abstract
This case study of the use of health-care services in northern Quebec is the first of a series of reports dealing with the health status, risk factors and access to care of the two major aboriginal populations in this region, the Cree and the Inuit. The focus of the broader study is on the health status and risk factors in these native populations. This research, based on a survey conducted in 1983-84, describes the present health status and health-care system of the Cree and Inuit, then presents a path analysis model of their use of health services. The purpose of this approach is to provide health planners and care providers with useful information and to encourage the development of well-organized and reasonable health-care service delivery to these populations.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1476.
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A cost analysis of nonelective coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166832
Source
J Card Surg. 2006 Nov-Dec;21(6):621-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Philippe D Violette
Kristian B Filion
Seema Haider
Louise Pilote
Mark J Eisenberg
Author Affiliation
Divisions of Cardiology and Clinical Epidemiology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Card Surg. 2006 Nov-Dec;21(6):621-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Coronary Artery Bypass - economics - utilization
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Female
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay - economics - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Quebec - ethnology
Surgical Procedures, Elective - economics
United States
Abstract
Previous studies suggest that nonelective coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) is more costly than elective CABG. The goal of this study was to examine why cost differences exist between patients undergoing nonelective and elective CABG.
We compared the outcomes and costs of treating 1613 consecutive patients undergoing nonelective (N = 1071) and elective (N = 542) CABG at three U.S. hospitals. Participating centers each used the same cost accounting system to provide patient-level clinical and cost data. Total, direct, and overhead costs were examined as were department-level costs.
Compared to elective patients, nonelective patients were of similar age (66.4 years vs 67.0 years, respectively, p = NS), but were more likely to be female (32.7% vs 24.0%, p = 0.0003). Nonelective patients had longer lengths of stay (LOS) than elective patients (9.7 +/- 0.2 days vs 6.6 +/- 0.3 days, p
PubMed ID
17073972 View in PubMed
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Cross-cultural validation of the UCLA prostate cancer index.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186569
Source
Urology. 2003 Feb;61(2):302-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Pierre I Karakiewicz
Michael W Kattan
Simon Tanguay
Mostafa M Elhilali
Michel Bazinet
Peter T Scardino
Armen G Aprikian
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA.
Source
Urology. 2003 Feb;61(2):302-7
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Health status
Humans
Language
Male
Prostatectomy
Prostatic Neoplasms - psychology - surgery
Psychometrics - methods
Quality of Life
Quebec - ethnology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sickness Impact Profile
Translations
Abstract
To explore the impact of cross-cultural differences on University of California, Los Angeles, Prostate Cancer Index (PCI) reliability and validity, which is unknown. The PCI represents the most widely used prostate cancer-specific health-related quality-of-life assessment tool.
The PCI sexual and urinary scales, the RAND SF-36 survey, and the Prostate Outcomes Research Team (PORT) prostate cancer treatment complication profile were self-administered. The principal sample consisted of 2415 men (anglophone 256, francophone 2159) treated with radical prostatectomy in Quebec between 1988 and 1996. An additional 35 men (anglophone 17, francophone 18) formed the retest sample.
The PCI demonstrated excellent internal consistency and test-retest reliability in tests based on the entire cohort and in tests addressing the two linguistically different groups. The instrument showed a lack of convergence with the SF-36 scales, confirming the distinctness of the generic and prostate cancer-specific constructs. The PCI sexual scales converged with the aggregate PORT sexual items (r = 0.8), and the PCI urinary scales were strongly related to the aggregate PORT urinary items (r = 0.7). Convergence between PCI urinary bother and function was strong (r = 0.8), but only moderate convergence was noted between PCI sexual bother and function (r = 0.4). The relation between bother and function in both urinary and sexual domains was weaker in anglophone participants relative to their francophone counterparts.
The PCI is reliable and, at best, only modestly affected by cultural differences when administered to culturally distinct English-speaking men or when translated into French.
PubMed ID
12597935 View in PubMed
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40 records – page 1 of 4.