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A 24-month clinical study of the incidence and progression of dental caries in relation to consumption of chewing gum containing xylitol in school preventive programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228109
Source
J Dent Res. 1990 Nov;69(11):1771-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1990
Author
D. Kandelman
G. Gagnon
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Health, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Montreal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Dent Res. 1990 Nov;69(11):1771-5
Date
Nov-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Chewing Gum
Child
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - pathology - prevention & control
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Quebec - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
School Dentistry
Socioeconomic Factors
Xylitol
Abstract
The effect of chewing gum containing xylitol on the incidence and progression of dental caries was tested in a sample of 274 children, aged eight and nine years, of low socio-economic status and high caries rate. They were divided into two experimental groups (15% and 65% xylitol chewing gum distributed three times a day at school) and one control group (without chewing gum). The three groups were exposed to the same basic preventive program. Children who chewed gum had a significantly lower net progression of decay (progressions-reversals) over a 24-month period than did the controls. Results for the two groups chewing gum were similar. Chewing xylitol gum had a beneficial effect on the caries process for all types of tooth surfaces, and especially for bucco-lingual surfaces. The two experimental groups had a DMF(S) increment of 2.24 surfaces, compared with 6.06 surfaces for the control group. For this indicator, there was no difference between the two experimental groups. Results for the plaque index were in agreement with those of the DMF(S) increment and the net progression of decay.
PubMed ID
2229617 View in PubMed
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The 2010 American college of rheumatology fibromyalgia survey diagnostic criteria and symptom severity scale is a valid and reliable tool in a French speaking fibromyalgia cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120514
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2012;13:179
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Mary-Ann Fitzcharles
Peter A Ste-Marie
Pantelis Panopalis
Henri Ménard
Yoram Shir
Fred Wolfe
Author Affiliation
Division of Rheumatology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. mary-ann.fitzcharles@muhc.mcgill.ca
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2012;13:179
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comprehension
Disability Evaluation
Female
Fibromyalgia - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Health Surveys
Humans
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Predictive value of tests
Quality of Life
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Fibromyalgia (FM) is a pain condition with associated symptoms contributing to distress. The Fibromyalgia Survey Diagnostic Criteria and Severity Scale (FSDC) is a patient-administered questionnaire assessing diagnosis and symptom severity. Locations of body pain measured by the Widespread Pain Index (WPI), and the Symptom Severity scale (SS) measuring fatigue, unrefreshing sleep, cognitive and somatic complaints provide a score (0-31), measuring a composite of polysymptomatic distress. The reliability and validity of the translated French version of the FSDC was evaluated.
The French FSDC was administered twice to 73 FM patients, and was correlated with measures of symptom status including: Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), and a visual analogue scale (VAS) for global severity and pain. Test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and construct validity were evaluated.
Test-retest reliability was between .600 and .888 for the 25 single items of the FSDC, and .912 for the total FSDC, with all correlations significant (p?
Notes
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Cites: Pain. 1975 Sep;1(3):277-991235985
PubMed ID
22994975 View in PubMed
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Agreement in measuring socio-economic status: area-based versus individual measures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198589
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2000;21(1):1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
K. Demissie
J A Hanley
D. Menzies
L. Joseph
P. Ernst
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. demisski@umdnj.edu.
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2000;21(1):1-7
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Occupations
Poverty Areas
Quebec - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Residence Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Area-based socio-economic status (SES) measures are frequently used in epidemiology. Such an approach assumes socio-economic homogeneity within an area. To quantify the agreement between area-based SES measures and SES assessed at the individual level, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 943 children who resided in 155 small enumeration areas and 117 census tracts from 18 schools in Montreal, Quebec. We used street address information together with 1986 census data and parental occupation to establish area-based and individual level SES indicators, respectively. As compared with the SES score determined at the level of the individual, 13 different area-based SES indices classified the children within the same quintile 28.7% (+/- 2.8%) of the time. The discrepancy was within one quintile in 35.3% (+/- 2.3%) of cases, two quintiles in 20.6% (+/- 3.6%), three quintiles in 11.3% (+/- 4.2%) and four quintiles in 4.1% (+/- 0.2%). In conclusion, we observed a substantial discrepancy between area- based SES measures and SES assessed at the individual level. Caution should therefore be used in designing or interpreting the results of studies in which area-based SES measures are used to test hypotheses or control for confounding.
PubMed ID
10813687 View in PubMed
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[An indicator of needs for the regional allocation of public health resources in Quebec].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211528
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Jul-Aug;87(4):280-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
P. Ferland
R. Pampalon
J. Sauvé
Author Affiliation
Régie régionale de la santé et des services sociaux de la Mauricie-Bois-Francs, Direction de la santé publique, Drummondville, QC.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Jul-Aug;87(4):280-5
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Care Rationing
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Population
Preventive Health Services - economics - organization & administration
Quebec - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
This paper proposes an indicator of needs for regional resource allocation in public health in Quebec. In the literature, the only reported measure of needs for regional resource allocation in public health has two parameters: size of population and Potential Years of Life Lost for preventable causes of death (APVP-EV). We verified whether APVP-EV were associated with various indices of socioeconomic conditions and lifestyle, preventive behaviours, satisfaction with social life, healthy life expectancy and some clienteles specific to public health. Our analysis indicates that the rate of Potential Years of Life Lost by avoidable causes is significantly related to all variables except satisfaction with social life. We therefore propose using size of population and its rate of APVP-EV to determine regional allocation of resources in public health.
PubMed ID
8964026 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the prevalence of the 985A>G MCAD mutation in the French-Canadian population using allele-specific PCR.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163252
Source
Clin Genet. 2007 Jun;71(6):569-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
S. Giroux
A. Dubé-Linteau
G. Cardinal
Y. Labelle
N. Laflamme
Y. Giguère
F. Rousseau
Author Affiliation
Unité de Recherche en Génétique Humaine et Moléculaire, Centre de Recherche de l'Hôpital St-François d'Assise du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec, Canada.
Source
Clin Genet. 2007 Jun;71(6):569-75
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase - deficiency - genetics
Alleles
DNA Mutational Analysis
France - ethnology
Gene Frequency
Genetic Testing - economics - methods
Genotype
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors - enzymology - epidemiology - genetics
Point Mutation
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Quebec - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Inherited deficiency of medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) is a severe, sometimes fatal disorder. A single mutation in the MCAD gene, 985A>G, is involved in approximately 90% of cases. To evaluate the relevance of implementing a systematic population-based screening program in the province of Quebec using a biochemical test, we measured the prevalence of this mutation in a set of anonymous newborn samples from the Quebec City area, a region where the majority of its inhabitants are French-Canadians. An allele-specific polymerase chain reaction assay was designed and used to detect the mutation in 7143 DNA samples obtained from consecutive anonymous newborns. Pools of eight DNA samples were genotyped in parallel for the same mutation to validate this pooling strategy. The allelic frequency of the MCAD 985A>G mutation was found to be 0.71% and the carrier frequency 1:71 (95% confidence interval 1:55 to 1:98). This estimate predicts a homozygous frequency of 1:19,837. Ninety-nine heterozygous carriers and one homozygous individual were identified out of 7143 samples. There was 100% concordance between the individual and pooled analyses, and the pooling strategy reduced the total genotyping costs by approximately 70%. The carrier frequency estimated for this population is similar to other northwestern European populations and would support implementation of systematic newborn screening (such as tandem mass spectrometry screening) for this disease. Pooling DNA samples followed by genotyping appears to be cost-effective for estimating prevalence of rare mutations.
PubMed ID
17539907 View in PubMed
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The association between nocturnal hot flashes and sleep in breast cancer survivors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179947
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2004 Jun;27(6):513-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Josée Savard
Judith R Davidson
Hans Ivers
Catherine Quesnel
Dominique Rioux
Véronique Dupéré
Mélissa Lasnier
Sébastien Simard
Charles M Morin
Author Affiliation
Laval University Cancer Research Center and School of Psychology, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2004 Jun;27(6):513-22
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Circadian Rhythm
Comorbidity
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Hot Flashes - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Statistics as Topic
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study examined the relationship between objectively measured nocturnal hot flashes and objectively measured sleep in breast cancer survivors with insomnia. Twenty-four women who had completed treatment for non-metastatic breast cancer participated. All were enrolled in a study of cognitive-behavioral treatment for chronic insomnia. Nocturnal hot flashes and sleep were measured by skin conductance and polysomnography, respectively. The 10-minute periods around hot flashes were found to have significantly more wake time, and more stage changes to lighter sleep, than other 10-minute periods during the night. Nights with hot flashes had a significantly higher percentage of wake time, a lower percentage of Stage 2 sleep, and a longer REM latency compared to nights without hot flashes. Overall, hot flashes were found to be associated with less efficient, more disrupted sleep. Nocturnal hot flashes, or their underlying mechanisms, should be considered as potential contributors to sleep disruption in women with breast cancer who report poor sleep.
PubMed ID
15165649 View in PubMed
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Atypical ductal hyperplasia diagnosed at sonographically guided core needle biopsy: frequency, final surgical outcome, and factors associated with underestimation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104292
Source
AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2014 Jun;202(6):1389-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Benoît Mesurolle
Juan Carlos Hidalgo Perez
Fahad Azzumea
Emmanuelle Lemercier
Xuanqian Xie
Ann Aldis
Atilla Omeroglu
Sarkis Meterissian
Author Affiliation
1 All authors: Cedar Breast Clinic, McGill University Health Center, Royal Victoria Hospital, 687 Pine Ave W, Montreal, PQ, H3H 1A1 Canada.
Source
AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2014 Jun;202(6):1389-94
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biopsy, Large-Core Needle - statistics & numerical data
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration - statistics & numerical data
False Negative Reactions
Female
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Precancerous Conditions - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Quebec - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purposes of this article were to review the mammographic and sonographic features of breast masses yielding atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) at sonographically guided biopsy, evaluate the surgical pathology outcome of these lesions, and determine whether clinical or imaging features can be used to predict upgrade to malignancy.
Among 6325 sonographically guided biopsies (2003- 2010) (14-gauge cores), 56 yielded the diagnosis of ADH (0.9%). Six patients were excluded (lost to follow-up). Fifty lesions were surgically excised in 45 patients. Mammographic and sonographic features were analyzed in consensus by two radiologists using the BI-RADS lexicon.
Forty-five patients (mean age, 56 years; 12
PubMed ID
24848840 View in PubMed
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Benzodiazepines and elderly drivers: a comparison of pharmacoepidemiological study designs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163074
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2007 Aug;16(8):845-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Caroline Hebert
J A C Delaney
Brenda Hemmelgarn
Linda E Lévesque
Samy Suissa
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Epidemiology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Canada.
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2007 Aug;16(8):845-9
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Automobile Driving
Benzodiazepines - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics
Case-Control Studies
Central Nervous System Agents - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics
Cross-Over Studies
Databases, Factual
Epidemiologic Research Design
Female
Half-Life
Humans
Male
Odds Ratio
Pharmacoepidemiology - methods
Quebec - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Risk
Abstract
Contradictory results were published from two studies in the late 1990s about the effects of long half-life benzodiazepine use on the risk of motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) in the elderly. The use of different study designs could explain the differences observed in these studies.
The results of an unmatched case-control study were compared to those of a case-crossover study using the same prescription claims database to determine whether the current use of benzodiazepines increased the risk of MVCs.
There were 5579 cases and 12 911 controls identified between the years 1990 and 1993 in the province of Quebec, Canada. The case-control approach demonstrated an increased rate of injurious MVC associated with the current use of long-acting benzodiazepines [odds ratio (OR) 1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12-1.88]. The case-crossover approach applied to all cases did not show any association [OR 0.99; 95%CI: 0.83-1.19]. However, among the cases restricted to subjects with four or less prescriptions filled in the previous year, corresponding more to transient exposures, the OR was elevated [OR 1.53; 95%CI: 1.08-2.16].
Differences in study design and analysis may explain some of the discrepancies in previous results. Both study designs provide evidence that long-acting benzodiazepines appear to be associated with an increased risk of MVC.
Notes
Comment In: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2007 Aug;16(8):850-317636552
PubMed ID
17563091 View in PubMed
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Childhood asthma surveillance using administrative data: consistency between medical billing and hospital discharge diagnoses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156742
Source
Can Respir J. 2008 May-Jun;15(4):188-92
Publication Type
Article
Author
France Labrèche
Tom Kosatsky
Raymond Przybysz
Author Affiliation
Montreal Department of Public Health, Montreal, Quebec. france.labreche@inspq.qc.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2008 May-Jun;15(4):188-92
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Feasibility Studies
Fees, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Patient Credit and Collection - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance - methods
Quebec - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The absence of ongoing surveillance for childhood asthma in Montreal, Quebec, prompted the present investigation to assess the validity and practicality of administrative databases as a foundation for surveillance.
To explore the consistency between cases of asthma identified through physician billings compared with hospital discharge summaries.
Rates of service use for asthma in 1998 among Montreal children aged one, four and eight years were estimated. Correspondence between the two databases (physician billing claims versus medical billing claims) were explored during three different time periods: the first day of hospitalization, during the entire hospital stay, and during the hospital stay plus a one-day margin before admission and after discharge ('hospital stay +/- 1 day').
During 1998, 7.6% of Montreal children consulted a physician for asthma at least once and 0.6% were hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of asthma. There were no contemporaneous physician billings for asthma 'in hospital' during hospital stay +/- 1 day for 22% of hospitalizations in which asthma was the primary diagnosis recorded at discharge. Conversely, among children with a physician billing for asthma 'in hospital', 66% were found to have a contemporaneous in-hospital record of a stay for 'asthma'.
Both databases of hospital and medical billing claims are useful for estimating rates of hospitalization for asthma in children. The potential for diagnostic imprecision is of concern, especially if capturing the exact number of uses is more important than establishing patterns of use.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18551199 View in PubMed
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Community periodontal index of treatment needs and prevalence of periodontal conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198316
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2000 May;27(5):308-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
M. Benigeri
J M Brodeur
M. Payette
A. Charbonneau
A I Ismaïl
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2000 May;27(5):308-12
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Epidemiologic Methods
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
In 1977, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a new index, the community periodontal index of treatment needs (CPITN) to evaluate the periodontal treatment needs of populations. The aim of this study is to compare different approaches of recording and presenting the CPITN.
A sample of 2110 subjects aged 35-44 years were examined between September 1994 and July 1995, throughout the province of Quebec, Canada. For each tooth (3rd molars excluded), the presence of bleeding and calculus, the level of epithelial attachment, and the depth of periodontal pockets were measured. Periodontal pocket depths were measured from the edge of the free gingiva, at 2 sites (mesiovestibular and vestibular), as well as all around the tooth.
Only 8.5% of adults had at least one tooth with a 6 mm or deeper periodontal pocket when probing on 2 sites, whereas if probing is done all around the tooth, this percentage is 2.5x higher (21.4%). The partial recording of pocket depths (10 index teeth recommended by WHO, or 2 quadrants chosen at random) resulted in an underestimation of the prevalence of subjects with at least one tooth with a periodontal pocket (CPITN score 3 and 4). Among subjects with at least one tooth with a 6 mm or deeper periodontal pocket, 12% were not detected with the 10 index teeth recording, and 25% go undetected with the measure on 2 quadrants. Finally, using the % of subjects with periodontal pockets overestimates the prevalence of deep pockets compared with using sextants. Indeed, close to 30.0% of sextants have no treatment needs, whereas only 5.2% of subjects are in this category. Similarly, 7.7% of sextants have at least one tooth with a 6 mm or deeper periodontal pocket, yet there are 3x more subjects in this category (21.4%).
PubMed ID
10847533 View in PubMed
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58 records – page 1 of 6.