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3-year impact of a provincial choking prevention program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166017
Source
J Otolaryngol. 2006 Aug;35(4):216-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Nathalie Després
Annie Lapointe
Marie-Claude Quintal
Pierre Arcand
Chantal Giguère
Anthony Abela
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec.
Source
J Otolaryngol. 2006 Aug;35(4):216-21
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Airway Obstruction - epidemiology - prevention & control
Child
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Foreign Bodies
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine the impact of a provincial choking prevention program (CPP) on the incidence of aerodigestive foreign body cases among children.
The CPP, including posters, pamphlets, an informative video, and annual participation in the Parents & Kids Fair, was launched throughout Quebec in October 1999. The incidence rates of aerodigestive foreign body cases prior to implementation (during 1997-1998) and subsequently (2000-2002) within the province and our tertiary care centre (Sainte-Justine Hospital) were compared by estimating incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and associated 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs).
No significant changes in the incidence of aerodigestive foreign body cases after program implementation were observed in our hospital (age-adjusted IRR 0.92, 95% CI 0.79-1.07). The provincial rates were higher after program implementation (age-adjusted IRR 1.15, 95% CI 1.05-1.25).
To influence choking prevention habits, modifications to the campaign are required. Strategies are discussed.
PubMed ID
17176795 View in PubMed
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A 5-year prospective assessment of the risk associated with individual benzodiazepines and doses in new elderly users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176448
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Feb;53(2):233-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Robyn Tamblyn
Michal Abrahamowicz
Roxane du Berger
Peter McLeod
Gillian Bartlett
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. robyn.tamblyn@mcgill.ca
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Feb;53(2):233-41
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Benzodiazepines - administration & dosage - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Half-Life
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine the risk of injury associated with the new use of individual benzodiazepines and dosage regimens in the elderly.
Prospective database cohort study with 5 years of follow-up.
Quebec, Canada.
Two hundred fifty-three thousand two hundred forty-four persons aged 65 and older who were nonusers of benzodiazepines in the year before follow-up.
Population-based hospitalization and prescription and medical services claims databases were used to compare the risk of injury during periods of benzodiazepine use with those of nonuse. Periods of use were measured for 10 insured benzodiazepines by drug and dose as time-dependent covariates. Injury was defined as the first occurrence of a nonvertebral fracture, soft-tissue injury, or accident-related hospital admission. Patient age, sex, previous injury history, concomitant medication use, and comorbidity were measured as fixed and time-dependent confounders. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the risk of injury with benzodiazepine use and to determine the extent to which patient characteristics, differences in dosage, or in the effect of increasing dosage for individual drugs explained differences between drugs.
More than one-quarter (27.6%) of 253,244 elderly were dispensed at least one prescription for a benzodiazepine, and 17.7% of elderly were treated for at least one injury during follow-up, of which fractures were the most common. Patient characteristics, systematic differences in the risk of injury in elderly prescribed different benzodiazepines, and differences in dosage prescribed for individual drugs confounded the risk of injury with benzodiazepine use. The risk of injury with increasing dosage varied by drug from a hazard ratio of 0.92 (95% confidence interval (CI)=0.60, 1.42) for alprazolam to 2.20 (95% CI=1.39, 3.47) for flurazepam per 1 standardized adult dose increase.
The risk of injury varied by benzodiazepine, independent of half-life, as did the risk associated with increasing dosage for individual products. Higher doses of oxazepam, flurazepam, and chlordiazepoxide are associated with the greatest risk of injury in the elderly.
Notes
Comment In: ACP J Club. 2005 Jul-Aug;143(1):2415989312
PubMed ID
15673346 View in PubMed
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A 12-year cohort study on adverse pregnancy outcomes in Eastern Townships of Canada: impact of endometriosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256963
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2014 Jan;30(1):34-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Aziz Aris
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology, Clinical Research Centre of Sherbrooke University Hospital Centre , Sherbrooke, Quebec , Canada.
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2014 Jan;30(1):34-7
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Endometriosis - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Peritoneal Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to provide a temporal-spatial reference of adverse pregnancy outcomes (APO) and examine whether endometriosis promotes APO in the same population. Among the 31?068 women who had a pregnancy between 1997 and 2008 in Eastern Townships of Canada, 6749 (21.7%) had APO. These APO increased significantly with maternal age and over time (r(2?)=?0.522, p?=?0.008); and were dominated by preterm birth (9.3%), pregnancy-induced hypertension (8.3%) including gestational hypertension (6.5%), low birth weight (6.3%), gestational diabetes (3.4%), pregnancy loss (2.2%) including spontaneous abortion (1.5%) and stillbirth (0.6%), intrauterine growth restriction (2.1%) and preeclampsia (1.8%). Among the 31?068 pregnancies, 784 (2.5%) had endometriosis and 183 (23.3%) had both endometriosis and APO. Endometriosis has been shown to increase the incidence of fetal loss (OR?=?2.03; 95% CI?=?1.42-2.90, p?
PubMed ID
24134807 View in PubMed
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A 24-month clinical study of the incidence and progression of dental caries in relation to consumption of chewing gum containing xylitol in school preventive programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228109
Source
J Dent Res. 1990 Nov;69(11):1771-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1990
Author
D. Kandelman
G. Gagnon
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Health, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Montreal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Dent Res. 1990 Nov;69(11):1771-5
Date
Nov-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Chewing Gum
Child
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - pathology - prevention & control
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Quebec - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
School Dentistry
Socioeconomic Factors
Xylitol
Abstract
The effect of chewing gum containing xylitol on the incidence and progression of dental caries was tested in a sample of 274 children, aged eight and nine years, of low socio-economic status and high caries rate. They were divided into two experimental groups (15% and 65% xylitol chewing gum distributed three times a day at school) and one control group (without chewing gum). The three groups were exposed to the same basic preventive program. Children who chewed gum had a significantly lower net progression of decay (progressions-reversals) over a 24-month period than did the controls. Results for the two groups chewing gum were similar. Chewing xylitol gum had a beneficial effect on the caries process for all types of tooth surfaces, and especially for bucco-lingual surfaces. The two experimental groups had a DMF(S) increment of 2.24 surfaces, compared with 6.06 surfaces for the control group. For this indicator, there was no difference between the two experimental groups. Results for the plaque index were in agreement with those of the DMF(S) increment and the net progression of decay.
PubMed ID
2229617 View in PubMed
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25 years' experience with lymphangiomas in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201178
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 1999 Jul;34(7):1164-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
A. Alqahtani
L T Nguyen
H. Flageole
K. Shaw
J M Laberge
Author Affiliation
The Montreal Children's Hospital, Department of Surgery, McGill University, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 1999 Jul;34(7):1164-8
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Head and Neck Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Lymphangioma - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Male
Mediastinal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Quebec - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The management of lymphangioma in children is challenging because complete resection is difficult to achieve in some cases, and recurrences are common. The authors reviewed their experience to assess the risk factors for recurrence and the role of nonoperative treatment.
A retrospective study over a period of 25 years was carried out. One hundred eighty-six patients with 191 lesions (five patients with de novo lesions in different sites) were treated. There were 98 boys and 88 girls. The average age at diagnosis was 3.3 years (range, fetal life to 17 years) and the average size 8 cm in diameter. Histocytological confirmation was obtained in all patients. The involved sites were head and neck, 89 patients (48%); trunk and extremities, 78 patients (42%); internal or visceral locations (eg, abdominal and thorax), 19 patients (10%). The treatment consisted of macroscopically complete excision in 145 patients (150 lesions, of which five were recurrences in different sites), partial excision in 10 patients, aspiration in five patients, laser excision in 10 patients, biopsy only in four patients, drainage and biopsy in two patients, and injection of sclerosing agents in 10 patients.
There were 54 recurrences; 44 underwent excision (five of them more than once), and five regressed spontaneously on follow-up. Five other recurrences were stable and not progressing. Recurrences, (defined as clinically obvious disease), were found to be 100% after aspiration, 100% after injection, 40% after incomplete excision, 40% after laser excision, and 17% after macroscopically complete excision. The recurrence rate in the last group was the highest in the head (33%), the least in the internal locations (0%), and intermediate for the cervical location (13%). There were no significant differences, in terms of outcome, between those who had their surgery immediately at the time of diagnosis (n = 101) and those who had delayed surgery (n = 85).
There were fewer recurrences after macroscopically complete excision. Aspiration and injection had the highest recurrence rate. Risk factors for recurrence included location, size, and complexity of lesions. A period of observation may be useful for infants to facilitate complete excision. In the present series, spontaneous regression was infrequent and was seen more often with recurrent lesions.
PubMed ID
10442614 View in PubMed
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50bp deletion in the promoter for superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) reduces SOD1 expression in vitro and may correlate with increased age of onset of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156293
Source
Amyotroph Lateral Scler. 2008 Aug;9(4):229-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Wendy J Broom
Matthew Greenway
Ghazaleh Sadri-Vakili
Carsten Russ
Kristen E Auwarter
Kelly E Glajch
Nicolas Dupre
Robert J Swingler
Shaun Purcell
Caroline Hayward
Peter C Sapp
Diane McKenna-Yasek
Paul N Valdmanis
Jean-Pierre Bouchard
Vincent Meininger
Betsy A Hosler
Jonathan D Glass
Meraida Polack
Guy A Rouleau
Jang-Ho J Cha
Orla Hardiman
Robert H Brown
Author Affiliation
Day Neuromuscular Research Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA. wendy.broom@gmail.com
Source
Amyotroph Lateral Scler. 2008 Aug;9(4):229-37
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - enzymology - epidemiology - genetics
Base Sequence
DNA Mutational Analysis
Female
Gene Expression
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Homozygote
Humans
Ireland - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Genetic
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Scotland - epidemiology
Sequence Deletion
Sp1 Transcription Factor - metabolism
Superoxide Dismutase - genetics - metabolism
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective was to test the hypothesis that a described association between homozygosity for a 50bp deletion in the SOD1 promoter 1684bp upstream of the SOD1 ATG and an increased age of onset in SALS can be replicated in additional SALS and control sample sets from other populations. Our second objective was to examine whether this deletion attenuates expression of the SOD1 gene. Genomic DNA from more than 1200 SALS cases from Ireland, Scotland, Quebec and the USA was genotyped for the 50bp SOD1 promoter deletion. Reporter gene expression analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies were utilized to examine the functional effects of the deletion. The genetic association for homozygosity for the promoter deletion with an increased age of symptom onset was confirmed overall in this further study (p=0.032), although it was only statistically significant in the Irish subset, and remained highly significant in the combined set of all cohorts (p=0.001). Functional studies demonstrated that this polymorphism reduces the activity of the SOD1 promoter by approximately 50%. In addition we revealed that the transcription factor SP1 binds within the 50bp deletion region in vitro and in vivo. Our findings suggest the hypothesis that this deletion reduces expression of the SOD1 gene and that levels of the SOD1 protein may modify the phenotype of SALS within selected populations.
PubMed ID
18608091 View in PubMed
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The 1891-1920 birth cohort of Quebec chrysotile miners and millers: development from 1904 and mortality to 1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210233
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):13-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
F D Liddell
A D McDonald
J C McDonald
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University Montreal, Canada.
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):13-36
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Asbestosis - etiology - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Male
Mesothelioma - etiology - mortality
Mining - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper draws together the mortality experience for a cohort of some 11000 male Quebec Chrysotile miners and millers, reported at intervals since 1971 and now again updated. Of the 10918 men in the complete cohort, 1138 were lost to view, almost all never traced after employment of only a month or two before 1935; the other 9780 men were traced into 1992. Of these, 8009 (82%) are known to have died: 657 from lung cancer, 38 from mesotheliona, 1205 from other malignant disease, 108 from pneumoconiosis and 561 from other non-malignant respiratory diseases (excluding tuberculosis). After early fluctuations. SMRs (all causes) against Quebec rates have been reasonably steady since about 1945. For men first employed in Asbestos, mine or factory, they were very much what might have been expected for a blue collar population without any hazardous exposure. SMRs in the Thetford Mines area were almost 8% higher, but in line with anecdotal evidence concerning socio-economic status. At exposures below 300 (million particles per cubic foot) x years, (mpcf.y), equivalent to roughly 1000 (fibres/ml) x years-or, say, 10 years in the 1940s at 80 (fibres/ml)-findings were as follows. There were no discernible associations of degree of exposure and SMRs, whether for all causes of death or for all the specific cancer sites examined. The average SMRs were 1.07 (all causes), and 1.16, 0.93, 1.03 and 1.21, respectively, for gastric, other abdominal, laryngeal and lung cancer. Men whose exposures were less then 300 mpcf.y suffered almost one-half of the 146 deaths from pneumoconiosis or mesothelioma; the elimination of these two causes would have reduced these men's SMR (all causes) from 1.07 to approximately 1.06. Thus it is concluded from the viewpoint of mortality that exposure in this industry to less than 300 mpcf.y has been essentially innocuous, although there was a small risk or pneumoconiosis or mesothelioma. Higher exposures have, however, led to excesses, increasing with degree of exposure, of mortality from all causes, and from lung cancer and stomach cancer, but such exposures, of at least 300 mpcf.y, are several orders of magnitude more severe than any that have been seen for many years. The effects of cigarette smoking were much more deleterious than those of dust exposure, not only for lung cancer (the SMR for smokers of 20+ cigarettes a day being 4.6 times higher than that for non-smokers), but also for stomach cancer (2.0 times higher), laryngeal cancer (2.9 times higher), and-most importantly-for all causes (1.6 times higher).
Notes
Comment In: Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):3-129072948
Comment In: Ann Occup Hyg. 2001 Jun;45(4):329-35; author reply 336-811414250
PubMed ID
9072947 View in PubMed
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The 1891-1920 birth cohort of Quebec chrysotile miners and millers: mortality 1976-88.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219707
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1993 Dec;50(12):1073-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
J C McDonald
F D Liddell
A. Dufresne
A D McDonald
Author Affiliation
School of Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1993 Dec;50(12):1073-81
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos, Serpentine
Asbestosis - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Mesothelioma - mortality
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Exposure
Quebec - epidemiology
Smoking - mortality
Time Factors
Abstract
A cohort of some 11,000 men born 1891-1920 and employed for at least one month in the chrysotile mines and mills of Quebec, was established in 1966 and has been followed ever since. Of the 5351 men surviving into 1976, only 16 could not be traced; 2508 were still alive in 1989, and 2827 had died; by the end of 1992 a further 698 were known to have died, giving an overall mortality of almost 80%. This paper presents the results of analysis of mortality for the period 1976 to 1988 inclusive, obtained by the subject-years method, with Quebec mortality for reference. In many respects the standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) 20 years or more after first employment were similar to those for the period 1951-75--namely, all causes 1.07 (1951-75, 1.09); heart disease 1.02 (1.04); cerebrovascular disease 1.06 (1.07); external causes 1.17 (1.17). The SMR for lung cancer, however, rose from 1.25 to 1.39 and deaths from mesothelioma increased from eight (10 before review) to 25; deaths from respiratory tuberculosis fell from 57 to five. Among men whose exposure by age 55 was at least 300 million particles per cubic foot x years (mpcf.y), the SMR (all causes) was elevated in the two main mining regions, Asbestos and Thetford Mines, and for the small factory in Asbestos; so were the SMRs for lung cancer, ischaemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and respiratory disease other than pneumoconiosis. Except for lung cancer, however, there was little convincing evidence of gradients over four classes of exposure, divided at 30, 100, and 300 mpcf.y. Over seven narrower categories of exposure up to 300 mpcf.y the SMR for lung cancer fluctuated around 1.27 with no indication of trend, but increased steeply above that level. Mortality form pneumoconiosis was strongly related to exposure, and the trend for mesothelioma was not dissimilar. Mortality generally was related systematically to cigarette smoking habit, recorded in life from 99% of survivors into 1976; smokers of 20 or more cigarettes a day had the highest SMRs not only for lung cancer but also for all causes, cancer of the stomach, pancreas, and larynx, and ischaemic heart disease. For lung cancer SMRs increased fivefold with smoking, but the increase with dust exposure was comparatively slight for non-smokers, lower again for ex-smokers, and negligible for smokers of at least 20 cigarettes a day; thus the asbestos-smoking interaction was less than multiplicative. Of the 33 deaths from mesothelioma in the cohort to date, 28 were in miners and millers and five were in employees of a small asbestos products factory where commercial amphiboles had also been used. Preliminary analysis also suggest that the risk of mesothelioma was higher in the mines and mills at Thetford Mines than in those at Asbestos. More detailed studies of these differences and of exposure-response relations for lung cancer are under way.
Notes
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PubMed ID
8280638 View in PubMed
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[1998 Quebec Social and Health Survey: determinants of chronic respiratory diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193733
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 May-Jun;92(3):228-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Lévesque
P. Lajoie
M. Rhainds
T. Kosatsky
A M Grenier
P. Ernst
N. Audet
Author Affiliation
Direction régionale de santé publique de Québec, 2400, d'Estimauville, Beauport, Québec, G1E 7G9. benoît.lévesque@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 May-Jun;92(3):228-32
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asthma - complications
Bronchitis - complications
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Emphysema - complications
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking - adverse effects
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
In the course of the "1998 Health and Social Survey", questions were included to verify the prevalence of chronic respiratory diseases and also of wheezing. The objectives of this study were 1) to verify the prevalence of wheezing and its validity as an indicator of chronic respiratory diseases in Québec; and 2) to examine the relationship between chronic respiratory diseases and some of their potential determinants. A total of 30,386 individuals participated in the study. For all ages, the prevalence of wheezing was 5.4%. It was associated with asthma, allergies, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. A low familial income and tobacco smoking were associated with wheezing, asthma, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Passive smoking was associated with wheezing whereas the presence of carpets was associated with wheezing and asthma. Between 32 and 48% of families with an asthmatic or an allergic member modified their dwelling to alleviate respiratory problems. The prevalence of wheezing documented here was lower than in anglosaxon countries. This result could be explained by a cultural factor (the French translation or the perception of wheezing). This study emphasizes the role of reducing tobacco smoking in the prevention of chronic respiratory diseases.
PubMed ID
11496637 View in PubMed
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The 2010 American college of rheumatology fibromyalgia survey diagnostic criteria and symptom severity scale is a valid and reliable tool in a French speaking fibromyalgia cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120514
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2012;13:179
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Mary-Ann Fitzcharles
Peter A Ste-Marie
Pantelis Panopalis
Henri Ménard
Yoram Shir
Fred Wolfe
Author Affiliation
Division of Rheumatology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. mary-ann.fitzcharles@muhc.mcgill.ca
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2012;13:179
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comprehension
Disability Evaluation
Female
Fibromyalgia - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Health Surveys
Humans
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Predictive value of tests
Quality of Life
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Fibromyalgia (FM) is a pain condition with associated symptoms contributing to distress. The Fibromyalgia Survey Diagnostic Criteria and Severity Scale (FSDC) is a patient-administered questionnaire assessing diagnosis and symptom severity. Locations of body pain measured by the Widespread Pain Index (WPI), and the Symptom Severity scale (SS) measuring fatigue, unrefreshing sleep, cognitive and somatic complaints provide a score (0-31), measuring a composite of polysymptomatic distress. The reliability and validity of the translated French version of the FSDC was evaluated.
The French FSDC was administered twice to 73 FM patients, and was correlated with measures of symptom status including: Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), and a visual analogue scale (VAS) for global severity and pain. Test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and construct validity were evaluated.
Test-retest reliability was between .600 and .888 for the 25 single items of the FSDC, and .912 for the total FSDC, with all correlations significant (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
22994975 View in PubMed
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2170 records – page 1 of 217.