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16 records – page 1 of 2.

Biological monitoring of foundry workers exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25168
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1990 Jul;47(7):448-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1990
Author
D. Sherson
P. Sabro
T. Sigsgaard
F. Johansen
H. Autrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Vejle County Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1990 Jul;47(7):448-53
Date
Jul-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Benzo(a)pyrene - analysis
Denmark
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Polycyclic Compounds - analysis
Quartz - adverse effects
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - blood
Abstract
This investigation describes benzo(a)pyrene (BP) serum protein adduct concentrations in 45 foundry workers and 45 matched non-occupationally exposed controls. High and low BP exposure groups were defined using breathing zone hygienic samples for both quartz and BP exposures. A newly developed enzyme linked immunosorbent assay detected benzo(a)pyrenediolepoxide-I binding to serum protein. Mean BP protein adduct concentrations (SD) for non-smoking (24.0 BP equivalents/100 micrograms protein (21.0] and smoking (28.0 (18.2] foundry workers were significantly higher than mean values for non-smoking (7.23 (8.72] and smoking (14.2 (24.4] controls. Foundry workers with high exposures to either quartz (28.4 (15.5] or BP (30.7 (19.3] had slightly raised mean adduct concentrations compared with foundry workers with low exposure for quartz (23.9 (23.1] or BP (24.5 (19.4). Highest mean adduct concentrations were found among a small group of workers with simultaneous high exposures to both quartz and BP (39.2 (6.5] suggesting an additive effect. These data support the ideas of a possible aetiological connection between an increased risk of lung cancer and BP exposure among foundry workers, and an additive effect between BP and quartz. Measurement of BP serum protein adduct concentrations appears to be a useful method by which groups exposed to BP may be biologically monitored.
PubMed ID
2383513 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer morbidity and quartz exposure in Swedish iron foundries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123143
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Jul;86(5):499-507
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Håkan Westberg
Lena Andersson
Ing-Liss Bryngelsson
Yen Ngo
Carl-Göran Ohlson
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, 701 85, Örebro, Sweden.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Jul;86(5):499-507
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Iron
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Metallurgy
Models, Statistical
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Quartz - adverse effects - analysis
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine cancer morbidity amongst Swedish iron foundry workers with special reference to quartz exposure. In addition to respirable dust and quartz, phenol, formaldehyde, furfuryl alcohols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), carbon black, isocyanates and asbestos are used or generated by foundry production techniques and exposure to any of these substances could have potentially carcinogenic effects.
Cancer morbidity between 1958 and 2004 was evaluated in a cohort of 3,045 male foundry workers employed for >1 year between 1913 and 2005. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) were determined by comparing observed numbers of incident cancers with frequencies in the Swedish cancer register. Exposure measures were assessed using information from the personal files of employees and modelling quartz measurement based on a database of 1,667 quartz measurements. Dose responses for lung cancer were determined for duration of employment and cumulative quartz exposure for latency periods >20 years.
Overall cancer morbidity was not increased amongst the foundry workers (SIR 1.00; 95 % CI, 0.90-1.11), but the incidence of lung cancer was significantly elevated (SIR 1.61; 95 % CI, 1.20-2.12). A non-significant negative dose response was determined using external comparison with a latency period of >20 years (SIR 2.05, 1.72 1.26 for the low, medium and high exposure groups), supported by internal comparison data (hazard ratios 1, 1.01, 0.78) for the corresponding groups. For cancers at sites with at least five observed cases and a SIR > 1.25, non-significant risks with SIRs > 1.5 were determined for cancers of the liver, larynx, testis, connective muscle tissue, multiple myeloma plasmacytoma and lymphatic leukaemia.
A significant overall risk of lung cancer was determined, but using external and internal comparison groups could not confirm any dose response at our cumulative quartz dose levels.
PubMed ID
22729566 View in PubMed
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[Clinical course of pneumoconiosis after exposure to dust evaluated by the results of ambulatory follow-up].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224848
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1992;(6):17-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
N I Savvaitova
E I Finkel'berg
E L Vinogradova
L Ia Pikus
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1992;(6):17-9
Date
1992
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Ambulatory Care
Anthracosilicosis - etiology - therapy
Ceramics
Coal Mining
Combined Modality Therapy
Dust - adverse effects
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Quartz - adverse effects
Russia
Silicosis - etiology - therapy
Silicotuberculosis - etiology - therapy
Welding
Abstract
Results of follow-up and treatment of different pneumoconiosis types in 749 patients are represented. Rational employment combined with individualized treatment stabilize pneumoconiosis in 80.5% of cases with interstitial silicosis, in those with silico - silicosis --85.5% the nodular form in 70.5% and 77.8% of cases respectively. In the patients with the first symptoms of silicotuberculosisis the interstitial and nodular forms of the process stabilized in more than 50% of cases and in more than 60% of silico - silicatosis cases. Active interstitial tuberculosis was revealed in 7.3% of cases, nodular one--in 16.2%. The course of the macronodular pneumoconiosis in 50.2% of cases was unfavourable. 23.2% of patients with pneumoconiosis caused by electric-welding aerosol showed regress of pneumoconiosis in afterdust period.
PubMed ID
1478517 View in PubMed
Less detail

Computed tomographic scanning of the thorax in workers at risk of or with silicosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228306
Source
Semin Ultrasound CT MR. 1990 Oct;11(5):380-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1990

Determinants of exposure to dust and dust constituents in the Norwegian silicon carbide industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118473
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2013 May;57(4):417-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Solveig Føreland
Berit Bakke
Roel Vermeulen
Erik Bye
Wijnand Eduard
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway. solveig.foreland@stolav.no
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2013 May;57(4):417-31
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Carbon Compounds, Inorganic - adverse effects - analysis
Dust - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Health - standards
Occupations - classification
Quartz - adverse effects - analysis
Silicon Compounds - adverse effects - analysis
Silicon Dioxide - adverse effects - analysis
Abstract
The aim of this study was to identify important determinants of dust exposure in the Norwegian silicon carbide (SiC) industry and to suggest possible control measures.
Exposure to total dust, respirable dust, quartz, cristobalite, SiC, and fiber was assessed in three Norwegian SiC plants together with information on potential determinants of exposure. Mixed-effect models were constructed with natural log-transformed exposure as the dependent variable.
The exposure assessment resulted in about 700 measurements of each of the sampled agents. Geometric mean (GM) exposure for total dust, respirable dust, fibers, and SiC for all workers was 1.6mg m(-3) [geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 3.2], 0.30mg m(-3) (GSD = 2.5), 0.033 fibers cm(-3) (GSD = 5.2), and 0.069mg m(-3) (GSD = 3.1), respectively. Due to a large portion of quartz and cristobalite measurements below the limit of detection in the processing and maintenance departments (>58%), GM for all workers was not calculated. Work in the furnace department was associated with the highest exposure to fibers, quartz, and cristobalite, while work in the processing department was associated with the highest total dust, respirable dust, and SiC exposure. Job group was a strong determinant of exposure for all agents, explaining 43-82% of the between-worker variance. Determinants associated with increased exposure in the furnace department were location of the sorting area inside the furnace hall, cleaning tasks, building and filling furnaces, and manual sorting. Filling and changing pallet boxes were important tasks related to increased exposure to total dust, respirable dust, and SiC in the processing department. For maintenance workers, increased exposure to fibers was associated with maintenance work in the furnace department and increased exposure to SiC was related to maintenance work in the processing department.
Job group was a strong determinant of exposure for all agents. Several tasks were associated with increased exposure, indicating possibilities for exposure control measures. Recommendations for exposure reduction based on this study are (i) to separate the sorting area from the furnace hall, (ii) minimize manual work on furnaces and in the sorting process, (iii) use remote controlled sanders/grinders with ventilated cabins, (iv) use closed systems for filling pallet boxes, and (v) improve cleaning procedures by using methods that minimize dust generation.
PubMed ID
23204512 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Etiology and clinical characteristics of occupational pathology in workers engaged in the mechanical processing of crystal].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature253297
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1974 Aug;0(8):50-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1974

Exposure to cobalt chromium dust and lung disorders in dental technicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67702
Source
Thorax. 1995 Jul;50(7):769-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
A I Seldén
B. Persson
S I Bornberger-Dankvardt
L E Winström
L S Bodin
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Orebro Medical Center Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Thorax. 1995 Jul;50(7):769-72
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chromium Alloys - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Technicians
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pneumoconiosis - epidemiology - etiology
Quartz - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND--Dental technician's pneumoconiosis is a dust-induced fibrotic lung disease of fairly recent origin. This study was carried out to estimate its occurrence in Sweden. METHODS--Thirty seven dental technicians in central and south eastern Sweden with at least five years of exposure to dust from cobalt chromium molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys, identified by postal survey, agreed to undergo chest radiography and assessment of lung function and exposure to inorganic dust. RESULTS--Six subjects (16%; 95% confidence interval 6% to 23%) showed radiological evidence of dental technician's pneumoconiosis. The lung function of the study group was reduced compared with historical reference material. With local exhaust ventilation dust levels were generally low, whereas in dental laboratories without such equipment high levels of dust, particularly cobalt, were found. CONCLUSIONS--Pneumoconiosis may result from exposure to inorganic dust in the manufacturing of CoCrMo-based dental constructions. It is possible to reduce this hazard substantially by local exhaust ventilation.
PubMed ID
7570413 View in PubMed
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Occupational airborne exposure and the incidence of respiratory symptoms and asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15328
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2002 Oct 1;166(7):933-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2002
Author
Tomas M L Eagan
Amund Gulsvik
Geir E Eide
Per S Bakke
Author Affiliation
Department of Thoracic Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, N-5021 Bergen, Norway. tomas.eagan@med.uib.no
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2002 Oct 1;166(7):933-8
Date
Oct-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Comparative Study
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Quartz - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Several prevalence studies have suggested an association between occupational exposure and respiratory symptoms and asthma, but there has been a lack of incidence studies to verify this. This study examined the incidence of respiratory symptoms and asthma in an 11-year Norwegian community cohort study with 2,819 subjects. Predictors examined were sex, age, educational level, lifetime exposure to quartz, asbestos, and dust or fumes, as well as smoking habits and pack-years. The prevalence of exposure to quartz, asbestos, and dust or fumes was, respectively, 3.7%, 5.0%, and 28.3% at baseline. In those exposed to dust or fumes, the odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) varied between 1.4 (1.1, 1.7) and 2.1 (1.3, 3.2) for developing respiratory symptoms or asthma after adjusting for sex, age, educational level, and smoking. Between 5.7% and 19.3% of the incidence of respiratory symptoms and 14.4% of the incidence of asthma were attributable to dust or fumes exposure after adjustment for sex, age, educational level, and smoking. In conclusion, airborne occupational exposure increases the incidence of respiratory symptoms and asthma, independent of sex, age, educational level, smoking habits, and pack-years.
PubMed ID
12359649 View in PubMed
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Quartz exposure in the slate industry in northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203755
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1998 Nov;42(8):557-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
B E Bang
H. Suhr
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Regional Hospital of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1998 Nov;42(8):557-63
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Humans
Industry
Inhalation Exposure
Mining
Norway
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Quartz - adverse effects - analysis
Silicosis - etiology
Abstract
In this study we have measured exposure levels to quartz in different parts of the slate industry in Alta, Northern Norway. Full shift personal samples were collected from the breathing zones of outdoor and indoor workers in the slate quarries and a slate factory. The quartz content of respirable dust was between 7 and 41%. The slate factory had the lower quartz levels although 41% of total and 73% of respirable samples were above the Norwegian TLV for quartz. The average concentration of total quartz in the slate factory was 0.27 mg/m3 and the average concentration of respirable quartz was 0.12 mg/m3. Outdoor in the quarries the average levels of quartz were 0.58 and 0.13 mg/m3 for total and respirable quartz, respectively. From the beginning of the last decade most of the quarry-workers have built quarry halls to protect themselves against a cold winter climate. Inside in these quarry halls the average levels were 1.74 mg/m3 total quartz and 0.46 mg/m3 respirable quartz. Assessment of historical exposure showed that 32 of totally 45 quarry workers with available exposure history had a lifetime inhaled quartz dose of more than 10 g. There is reason to fear that silicosis will be an increasing problem among quarry workers if efforts to reduce quartz exposure are not put into effect.
PubMed ID
9838869 View in PubMed
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Relation of occupational exposure to respiratory symptoms and asthma in a general population sample: self-reported versus interview-based exposure data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15459
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Sep 1;154(5):477-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2001
Author
P S Bakke
R. Hanoa
A. Gulsvik
Author Affiliation
Department of Thoracic Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Sep 1;154(5):477-83
Date
Sep-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Comparative Study
Cough - epidemiology - etiology
Dust - adverse effects
Female
Gases - adverse effects
Humans
Interviews
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Recall
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Prevalence
Quartz - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Respiratory Sounds
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine how the consistency of self-reported exposure to dust or gas, asbestos, and quartz varied between subjects with and those without respiratory symptoms and asthma in a Norwegian community sample () in 1987-1988. Exposure characterization obtained in a structured work history interview was used as the "gold standard." The authors also wanted to assess how the exposure-disease relation differed when the exposure was based on self-reported versus interview-obtained data. The prevalence of self-reported exposure to dust or gas, asbestos, and quartz was 28%, 5%, and 4%, respectively. The sensitivity of the self-reported exposure data varied from 21% to 64% and was higher in those with than in those without the respiratory disorders. The specificity varied from 78% to 100% and was lower in those with than in those without the respiratory disorders. The sex-, age-, and smoking-adjusted odds ratios of the respiratory disorders in those with exposure to dust or gas and to asbestos were only slightly reduced when misclassification was taken into account. The corresponding numbers for exposure to quartz were halved and lost their statistical significance when the misclassification was allowed for. In this general population sample, the self-reported occupational, airborne exposure data were differentially misclassified by disease status.
PubMed ID
11532790 View in PubMed
Less detail

16 records – page 1 of 2.