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35 records – page 1 of 4.

Assessing the physician's standard of care when HIV is transmitted during artificial insemination. Ter Neuzen v. Korn.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218388
Source
J Contemp Health Law Policy. 1994;10:231-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994

Complaints in for-profit, non-profit and public nursing homes in two Canadian provinces.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138276
Source
Open Med. 2011;5(4):e183-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Margaret J McGregor
Marcy Cohen
Catherine-Rose Stocks-Rankin
Michelle B Cox
Kia Salomons
Kimberlyn M McGrail
Charmaine Spencer
Lisa A Ronald
Michael Schulzer
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Room 713, 828 West 10th Avenue,Vancouver, BC V5Z 1L8, Canada. mrgret@mail.ubc.ca
Source
Open Med. 2011;5(4):e183-92
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Government Regulation
Health Policy
Humans
Incidence
Nursing Homes - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Organizations, Nonprofit - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Patient Satisfaction - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Health Care - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Nursing homes provide long-term housing, support and nursing care to frail elders who are no longer able to function independently. Although studies conducted in the United States have demonstrated an association between for-profit ownership and inferior quality, relatively few Canadian studies have made performance comparisons with reference to type of ownership. Complaints are one proxy measure of performance in the nursing home setting. Our study goal was to determine whether there is an association between facility ownership and the frequency of nursing home complaints.
We analyzed publicly available data on complaints, regulatory measures, facility ownership and size for 604 facilities in Ontario over 1 year (2007/08) and 62 facilities in British Columbia (Fraser Health region) over 4 years (2004-2008). All analyses were carried out at the facility level. Negative binomial regression analysis was used to assess the association between type of facility ownership and frequency of complaints.
The mean (standard deviation) number of verified/substantiated complaints per 100 beds per year in Ontario and Fraser Health was 0.45 (1.10) and 0.78 (1.63) respectively. Most complaints related to resident care. Complaints were more frequent in facilities with more citations, i.e., violations of the legislation or regulations governing a home, (Ontario) and inspection violations (Fraser Health). Compared with Ontario's for-profit chain facilities, adjusted incident rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals of verified complaints were 0.56 (0.27-1.16), 0.58 (0.34-1.00), 0.43 (0.21- 0.88), and 0.50 (0.30- 0.84) for for-profit single-site, non-profit, charitable, and public facilities respectively. In Fraser Health, the adjusted incident rate ratio of substantiated complaints in non-profit facilities compared with for-profit facilities was 0.18 (0.07-0.45).
Compared with for-profit chain facilities, non-profit, charitable and public facilities had significantly lower rates of complaints in Ontario. Likewise, in British Columbia's Fraser Health region, non-profit owned facilities had significantly lower rates of complaints compared with for-profit owned facilities.
Notes
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Cites: BMJ. 2001 Sep 8;323(7312):566-911546707
Cites: Med Care. 2011 Jun;49(6):545-5221577182
PubMed ID
22567074 View in PubMed
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[Defects in the delivery of medical care to the population and their forensic medical evaluation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218531
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 1994 Apr-Jun;37(2):5-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
V V Andreev
O A Bykhovskaia
L E Bogdanova
A L Kossovoi
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 1994 Apr-Jun;37(2):5-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autopsy
Delivery of Health Care - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Expert Testimony - legislation & jurisprudence
Fatal Outcome
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - pathology
Humans
Male
Malpractice - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Quality of Health Care - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Abstract
A total of 177 records of expert evaluations carried out in 1987-1992 are reviewed, describing 526 cases of defective medical care. The incidence of accusations of medical workers of various specialties is analyzed, as is the incidence of inadequate care at various therapeutic institutions and at different stages of medical care, the outcomes of errors, and structure of errors made at prehospital and hospital stages.
PubMed ID
8009555 View in PubMed
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Development of a tool for measuring the concept of good care among patients and staff in relation to Swedish legislation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73032
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 1995 Jun;32(3):277-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
C. Götherström
E. Hamrin
M. Gullberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Caring Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 1995 Jun;32(3):277-87
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Nursing Audit - methods
Nursing Care - psychology - standards
Nursing Evaluation Research
Quality of Health Care - legislation & jurisprudence
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
An instrument for measuring the concept of good care, in relation to the Swedish Health and Medical Services Act, has been developed and tested in short-term care. The instrument comprises 14 statements on good care. The construct validity was estimated by factor analysis based on the results from 240 patients. Five factors explained 62% of the variance of the 14 variables and covered the following areas: information, security, accessibility, continuity, and influence and respect. Patients (n = 240) and registered nurses (n = 57) showed differences in estimations of the concept of good care on all factors. There were only minor differences, however, within the patient group and the nursing group, respectively, on comparing the two samples. The instrument needs further testing in different care conditions.
PubMed ID
7665316 View in PubMed
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Error and blame: the Winnipeg inquest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192179
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Nov 27;165(11):1461, 1463
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-2001
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Nov 27;165(11):1461, 1463
Date
Nov-27-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - legislation & jurisprudence - mortality
Cardiology Service, Hospital - standards
Clinical Competence
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Malpractice - legislation & jurisprudence
Manitoba - epidemiology
Medical Errors - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Organizational Culture
Quality of Health Care - legislation & jurisprudence
Surgery Department, Hospital - standards
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Nov 27;165(11):1503-411762575
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 6;164(3):39311232146
Cites: CMAJ. 1998 Nov 17;159(10):1285-79861227
Cites: J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1994 Mar;107(3):914-23; discussion 923-48127123
Comment On: CMAJ. 2001 Nov 27;165(11):1503-411762575
PubMed ID
11762565 View in PubMed
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European Court of Human Rights. ECHR 2006/12 case of Melnik v. Ukraine, 28 March 2006, no. 72286/01 (Second Section).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79304
Source
Eur J Health Law. 2006 Sep;13(3):282-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Dute Joseph
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Policy and Management, University Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
Source
Eur J Health Law. 2006 Sep;13(3):282-5
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Human Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Human Rights Abuses - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Patient Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Prisoners - legislation & jurisprudence
Quality of Health Care - legislation & jurisprudence
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - diagnosis
Ukraine
PubMed ID
17190355 View in PubMed
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A framework for an institutional high level security policy for the processing of medical data and their transmission through the Internet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192425
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2001 Apr-Jun;3(2):E14
Publication Type
Article
Author
C. Ilioudis
G. Pangalos
Author Affiliation
Informatics Laboratory, Faculty of Technology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, 54006, Greece; iliou@eng.auth.gr
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2001 Apr-Jun;3(2):E14
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information - legislation & jurisprudence
Canada
Computer Security - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Confidentiality - standards
Databases as Topic - classification - legislation & jurisprudence
Education, Professional - legislation & jurisprudence
Europe
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Internet - standards
Medical Informatics Computing - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - standards
Organizational Policy
Patient Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Quality of Health Care - legislation & jurisprudence
United States
Abstract
The Internet provides many advantages when used for interaction and data sharing among health care providers, patients, and researchers. However, the advantages provided by the Internet come with a significantly greater element of risk to the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of information. It is therefore essential that Health Care Establishments processing and exchanging medical data use an appropriate security policy.
To develop a High Level Security Policy for the processing of medical data and their transmission through the Internet, which is a set of high-level statements intended to guide Health Care Establishment personnel who process and manage sensitive health care information.
We developed the policy based on a detailed study of the existing framework in the EU countries, USA, and Canada, and on consultations with users in the context of the Intranet Health Clinic project. More specifically, this paper has taken into account the major directives, technical reports, law, and recommendations that are related to the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data, and the protection of privacy and medical data on the Internet.
We present a High Level Security Policy for Health Care Establishments, which includes a set of 7 principles and 45 guidelines detailed in this paper. The proposed principles and guidelines have been made as generic and open to specific implementations as possible, to provide for maximum flexibility and adaptability to local environments. The High Level Security Policy establishes the basic security requirements that must be addressed to use the Internet to safely transmit patient and other sensitive health care information.
The High Level Security Policy is primarily intended for large Health Care Establishments in Europe, USA, and Canada. It is clear however that the general framework presented here can only serve as reference material for developing an appropriate High Level Security Policy in a specific implementation environment. When implemented in specific environments, these principles and guidelines must also be complemented by measures, which are more specific. Even when a High Level Security Policy already exists in an institution, it is advisable that the management of the Health Care Establishment periodically revisits it to see whether it should be modified or augmented.
Notes
Cites: Med Inform Internet Med. 2000 Oct-Dec;25(4):265-7311198188
PubMed ID
11720956 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.