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The 6 dimensions of promising practice for case managed supports to end homelessness: part 2: the 6 dimensions of quality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129049
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katrina Milaney
Author Affiliation
Calgary Homeless Foundation, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. kmilaney@calgaryhomeless.com
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Case Management - standards - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Patient care team
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards - statistics & numerical data
Professional Competence
Quality of Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Homelessness is a social condition increasing in frequency and severity across Canada. Interventions to end and prevent homelessness include effective case management in addition to an affordable housing provision. Little standardization exists for service providers to guide their decision making in developing and maintaining effective case management programs. The purpose of this 2-part article is to articulate dimensions of promising practice for case managers working in a "Housing First" context. Part 1 discusses research processes and findings and Part 2 articulates the 6 dimensions of quality.
Practice settings include community-based organizations that employ and support case managers whose primary role is moving people from homelessness into permanent supportive housing.
Six dimensions of promising practice are critically important to reducing barriers, improving sector collaboration, and ensuring that case managers have appropriate and effective training and support. Dimensions of promising practice are (1) collaboration and cooperation-a true team approach; (2) right matching of services-person-centered; (3) contextual case management-culture and flexibility; (4) the right kind of engagement-relationships and advocacy; (5) coordinated and well-managed system-ethics and communication; and (6) evaluation for success-support and training.
Effective, coordinated case management, in addition to permanent affordable housing has the potential to reduce a person's or family's homelessness permanently. Organizations and professionals working in this context have the opportunity to improve processes, reduce burnout, collaborate and standardize, and, most importantly, efficiently and permanently end someone's homelessness with the help of dimensions of quality for case management.
PubMed ID
22146635 View in PubMed
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A 20-year follow-up study of endodontic variables and apical status in a Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85003
Source
Int Endod J. 2007 Dec;40(12):940-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Eckerbom M.
Flygare L.
Magnusson T.
Author Affiliation
Department of Dentistry, KFSH & RC, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. matseckerbom@hotmail.com
Source
Int Endod J. 2007 Dec;40(12):940-8
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dental Pulp Cavity - radiography
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Periapical Periodontitis - epidemiology - radiography
Prevalence
Quality of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Root Canal Obturation - standards
Root Canal Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIM: To re-examine a population after 20 years and evaluate changes in prevalence of endodontic treatment and apical periodontitis, as well as the technical quality of root fillings. METHODOLOGY: One hundred and fifteen out of an original 200 patients living in the northern part of Sweden were re-examined with a full mouth radiographic survey after 20 years. Frequencies of root canal treated teeth, apical periodontitis and quality parameters of root fillings were registered. RESULTS: The frequency of root canal treated teeth increased significantly (P
PubMed ID
17883402 View in PubMed
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[1986 SHSTF Congress. I venture before and take initiative].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236271
Source
Vardfacket. 1986 Nov 27;10(21):12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-1986

The 2010 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: part I - blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143445
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 May;26(5):241-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Robert R Quinn
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Raj S Padwal
Martin G Myers
Lyne Cloutier
Peter Bolli
Donald W McKay
Nadia A Khan
Michael D Hill
Jeff Mahon
Daniel G Hackam
Steven Grover
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Ellen Burgess
Finlay A McAlister
Maxime Lamarre-Cliche
Donna McLean
Ernesto L Schiffrin
George Honos
Karen Mann
Guy Tremblay
Alain Milot
Arun Chockalingam
Simon W Rabkin
Martin Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Kevin D Burns
Marcel Ruzicka
Norman R C Campbell
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, Alberta. rob.quinn@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 May;26(5):241-8
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - standards
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Quality of Health Care
Risk assessment
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with hypertension.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2008 to October 2009 with the aid of a medical librarian. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of authors and subgroup members were used to identify additional studies. Content and methodological experts assessed studies using prespecified, standardized evidence-based algorithms. Recommendations were based on evidence from peer-reviewed full-text articles only.
Recommendations for blood pressure measurement, criteria for hypertension diagnosis and follow-up, assessment of global cardiovascular risk, diagnostic testing, diagnosis of renovascular and endocrine causes of hypertension, home and ambulatory monitoring, and the use of echocardiography in hypertensive individuals are outlined. Changes to the recommendations for 2010 relate to automated office blood pressure measurements. Automated office blood pressure measurements can be used in the assessment of office blood pressure. When used under proper conditions, an automated office systolic blood pressure of 135 mmHg or higher or diastolic blood pressure of 85 mmHg or higher should be considered analogous to a mean awake ambulatory systolic blood pressure of 135 mmHg or higher and diastolic blood pressure of 85 mmHg or higher, respectively.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 63 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. To be approved, all recommendations were required to be supported by at least 70% of task force members. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20485688 View in PubMed
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The 2011 outcome from the Swedish Health Care Registry on Heart Disease (SWEDEHEART).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108055
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Jan Harnek
Johan Nilsson
Orjan Friberg
Stefan James
Bo Lagerqvist
Kristina Hambraeus
Asa Cider
Lars Svennberg
Mona From Attebring
Claes Held
Per Johansson
Tomas Jernberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Coronary Heart Disease, Skåne University Hospital, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. jan.harnek@skane.se
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Cardiology Service, Hospital - standards
Child
Child, Preschool
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Care Units - standards
Female
Heart Diseases - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Quality Improvement - standards
Quality of Health Care - standards
Registries
Secondary Prevention
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART) collects data to support the improvement of care for heart disease.
SWEDEHEART collects on-line data from consecutive patients treated at any coronary care unit n = (74), followed for secondary prevention, undergoing any coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention, percutaneous valve or cardiac surgery. The registry is governed by an independent steering committee, the software is developed by Uppsala Clinical Research Center and it is funded by The Swedish national health care provider independent of industry support. Approximately 80,000 patients per year enter the database which consists of more than 3 million patients.
Base-line, procedural, complications and discharge data consists of several hundred variables. The data quality is secured by monitoring. Outcomes are validated by linkage to other registries such as the National Cause of Death Register, the National Patient Registry, and the National Registry of Drug prescriptions. Thanks to the unique social security number provided to all citizens follow-up is complete. The 2011 outcomes with special emphasis on patients more than 80 years of age are presented.
SWEDEHEART is a unique complete national registry for heart disease.
PubMed ID
23941732 View in PubMed
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[A 10-year batch of dentists analyse themselves. III. Does the dentist in practice notice changes in quantity of work?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248650
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1978 May;88(5):196-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1978
Author
E. Dahl
I. Korto
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1978 May;88(5):196-8
Date
May-1978
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dental Care - standards
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dentists
Humans
Norway
Quality of Health Care
PubMed ID
273874 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal participation in the DOVE study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80691
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Jul-Aug;97(4):305-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ralph-Campbell Kelli
Pohar Sheri L
Guirguis Lisa M
Toth Ellen L
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Jul-Aug;97(4):305-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Consumer Participation
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups
Practice Guidelines
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Abstract
OBJECTIVE/BACKGROUND: Aboriginals constitute a substantial portion of the population of Northern Alberta. Determinants such as poverty and education can compound health-care accessibility barriers experienced by Aboriginals compared to non-Aboriginals. A diabetes care enhancement study involved the collection of baseline and follow-up data on Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal patients with known type 2 diabetes in two rural communities in Northern Alberta. Analyses were conducted to determine any demographic or clinical differences existing between Aboriginals and non-Aboriginals. METHODS: 394 diabetes patients were recruited from the Peace and Keeweetinok Lakes health regions. 354 self-reported whether or not they were Aboriginal; a total of 94 self-reported being Aboriginal. Baseline and follow-up data were collected through interviews, standardized physical assessments, laboratory testing and self-reporting questionnaires (RAND-12 and HUI3). RESULTS: Aboriginals were younger, with longer duration of diabetes, more likely to be female, and less likely to have completed high school. At baseline, self-reported health status was uniformly worse, but the differences disappeared with adjustments for sociodemographic confounders, except for perceived mental health status. Aboriginals considered their mental health status to be worse than non-Aboriginals at baseline. Some aspects of health utilization were also different. DISCUSSION: While demographics were different and some utilization differences existed, overall this analysis demonstrates that "Aboriginality" does not contribute to diabetes outcomes when adjusted for appropriate variables.
PubMed ID
16967751 View in PubMed
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Abridged version of the Society of Rural Physicians of Canada's discussion paper on rural hospital service closures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149706
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2009;14(3):111-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Peter Hutten-Czapski
Author Affiliation
Society of Rural Physicians of Canada, Shawville, Que. phc@srpc.ca
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2009;14(3):111-4
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost Savings
Health Facility Closure
Hospitals, Rural - economics - supply & distribution
Humans
Quality of Health Care
Regional Health Planning
Rural Health Services
Rural Population
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
19594995 View in PubMed
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Acceptance and importance of clinical pharmacists' LIMM-based recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127887
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2012 Apr;34(2):272-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Asa Bondesson
Lydia Holmdahl
Patrik Midlöv
Peter Höglund
Emmy Andersson
Tommy Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. asa.c.bondesson@skane.se
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2012 Apr;34(2):272-6
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Male
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Medication Reconciliation - organization & administration
Medication Therapy Management - organization & administration - standards
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Pharmacists - organization & administration - psychology
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - organization & administration - standards
Physicians - psychology
Quality of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of the clinical pharmacy service in a Swedish hospital according to the Lund Integrated Medicine Management (LIMM) model, in terms of the acceptance and clinical significance of the recommendations made by clinical pharmacists.
The clinical significance of the recommendations made by clinical pharmacists was assessed for a random sample of inpatients receiving the clinical pharmacy service in 2007. Two independent physicians retrospectively ranked the recommendations emerging from errors in the patients' current medication list and actual drug-related problems according to Hatoum, with rankings ranging between 1 (adverse significance) and 6 (extremely significant).
The random sample comprised 132 patients (out of 800 receiving the service). The clinical significance of 197 recommendations was assessed. The physicians accepted and implemented 178 (90%) of the clinical pharmacists' recommendations. Most of these recommendations, 170 (83%), were ranked 3 (somewhat significant) or higher.
This study provides further evidence of the quality of the LIMM model and confirms that the inclusion of clinical pharmacists in a multi-professional team can improve drug therapy for inpatients. The very high level of acceptance by the physicians of the pharmacists' recommendations further demonstrates the effectiveness of the process.
PubMed ID
22252773 View in PubMed
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2540 records – page 1 of 254.