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2008 Niday Perinatal Database quality audit: report of a quality assurance project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128969
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2011 Dec;32(1):32-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
S. Dunn
J. Bottomley
A. Ali
M. Walker
Author Affiliation
Better Outcomes Registry and Network (BORN Ontario), Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. sadunn@ohri.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2011 Dec;32(1):32-42
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection - standards
Databases, Factual - standards
Humans
Medical Records
Perinatal care
Quality Control
Abstract
This quality assurance project was designed to determine the reliability, completeness and comprehensiveness of the data entered into Niday Perinatal Database.
Quality of the data was measured by comparing data re-abstracted from the patient record to the original data entered into the Niday Perinatal Database. A representative sample of hospitals in Ontario was selected and a random sample of 100 linked mother and newborn charts were audited for each site. A subset of 33 variables (representing 96 data fields) from the Niday dataset was chosen for re-abstraction.
Of the data fields for which Cohen's kappa statistic or intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated, 44% showed substantial or almost perfect agreement (beyond chance). However, about 17% showed less than 95% agreement and a kappa or ICC value of less than 60% indicating only slight, fair or moderate agreement (beyond chance).
Recommendations to improve the quality of these data fields are presented.
PubMed ID
22153174 View in PubMed
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About the method of studying medical assistance management for rheumatic children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246390
Source
Sante Publique (Bucur). 1980;23(4):347-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980

Accuracy of reporting of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a provincial quality control program: a 9-year study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221090
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1993 May;31(5):1275-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1993
Author
A M Mackenzie
H. Richardson
P. Missett
D E Wood
D J Groves
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ottawa Civic Hospital, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1993 May;31(5):1275-9
Date
May-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Collection
Humans
Laboratories - standards
Methicillin Resistance
Microbial Sensitivity Tests - standards - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Quality Control
Questionnaires
Sensitivity and specificity
Staphylococcus aureus - drug effects
Abstract
We report the results of a province-wide quality control program in which five methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains were circulated to all Ontario laboratories (hospital, private, and public health laboratories) on nine occasions between 1980 and 1989. The level of expression of methicillin resistance in each of the isolates was determined by performing viable colony counts on serial dilutions of methicillin in agar, and each isolate was assigned to an expression class according to previous published criteria (A. Tomasz, S. Nachman, and H. Leaf, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 35:124-129, 1991). Over this time there was an improvement in the performance of laboratories in the recognition of three strains that were relatively easy to detect (strains B, C, and E). These strains were of expression class II, and 98% of laboratories reported correct identifications in 1986. Performance in identifying two strains (strains A and D) of expression class I remained poor. Strain A was circulated in two surveys in 1987 and 1989, and laboratories were sent a questionnaire requesting details of the methods used in those two surveys. The methods used by the laboratories were classified into three categories: disk diffusion, single-plate screening by agar incorporation, and automated methods, which included premanufactured MIC panels. Between the 1987 and 1989 surveys, there was no change in the performance of the disk diffusion test (60% correct on both occasions), but there was improvement in the sensitivity of the agar incorporation test (36% correct in 1987 and 84% correct in 1989) and in automated methods (43% correct in 1987 and 79% correct in 1989). Over a decade, there was overall improvement in the performance of laboratories in detecting easy-to-detect strains, but there were difficulties in detecting organisms of low expression class, and an organism of very low expression class should be designated as a control organism for routine testing of methicillin-resistant s. aureus isolates.
Notes
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1991 Jan;35(1):124-92014967
Cites: Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 1989 Sep-Oct;12(5):385-942533050
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1992 Jan;36(1):6-91590701
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1992 Jul;36(7):1367-731510429
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1992 Jul;36(7):1585-61510460
Cites: J Bacteriol. 1972 Feb;109(2):844-75058455
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1983 Nov;18(5):1084-916643661
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1983 Nov;18(5):1226-366605976
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1984 Jun;19(6):813-76565707
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1984 Sep;20(3):494-96490833
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1986 May;23(5):832-93011847
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1986 Nov;24(5):764-93639887
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1987 Apr;25(4):734-53571481
Cites: Am J Clin Pathol. 1987 Aug;88(2):231-53618554
Cites: Clin Microbiol Rev. 1988 Apr;1(2):173-863069195
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1989 May 4;320(18):1188-962651925
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1989 Jul;33(7):995-92675760
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1989 Nov;33(11):1869-742610497
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1992 Jan;36(1):25-311375449
PubMed ID
8501229 View in PubMed
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Action spectra affect variability of the climatology of biologically effective ultraviolet radiation on cloud-free days.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108780
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2013 Dec;157(4):491-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
D. Grifoni
G. Zipoli
F. Sabatini
G. Messeri
L. Bacci
Author Affiliation
CNR - Institute of Biometeorology, Via Madonna del Piano, 10, Sesto Fiorentino, FI 50019, Italy.
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2013 Dec;157(4):491-8
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atmosphere
Cataract - epidemiology
Climate
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Erythema - epidemiology
Eye - radiation effects
Germany
Humans
Italy
Keratitis - epidemiology
Norway
Plants - radiation effects
Quality Control
Seasons
Ultraviolet Rays
Vitamin D - biosynthesis
Weather
Abstract
Action spectrum (AS) describes the relative effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in producing biological effects and allows spectral UV irradiance to be weighted in order to compute biologically effective UV radiation (UVBE). The aim of this research was to study the seasonal and latitudinal distribution over Europe of daily UVBE doses responsible for various biological effects on humans and plants. Clear sky UV radiation spectra were computed at 30-min time intervals for the first day of each month of the year for Rome, Potsdam and Trondheim using a radiative transfer model fed with climatological data. Spectral data were weighted using AS for erythema, vitamin D synthesis, cataract and photokeratitis for humans, while the generalised plant damage and the plant damage AS were used for plants. The daily UVBE doses for the above-mentioned biological processes were computed and are analysed in this study. The patterns of variation due to season (for each location) and latitude (for each date) resulted as being specific for each adopted AS. The biological implications of these results are briefly discussed highlighting the importance of a specific UVBE climatology for each biological process.
PubMed ID
23843425 View in PubMed
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The adenosine triphosphate method as a quality control tool to assess 'cleanliness' of frequently touched hospital surfaces.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273379
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2015 Oct;91(2):166-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
L. Knape
A. Hambraeus
B. Lytsy
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2015 Oct;91(2):166-70
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenosine Triphosphate - analysis
Environmental Microbiology
Hospitals
Housekeeping, Hospital - methods - standards
Humans
Infection control - methods - standards
Microbiological Techniques - methods
Prospective Studies
Quality Control
Sweden
Abstract
The adenosine triphosphate (ATP) method is widely accepted as a quality control method to complement visual assessment, in the specifications of requirements, when purchasing cleaning contractors in Swedish hospitals.
To examine whether the amount of biological load, as measured by ATP on frequently touched near-patient surfaces, had been reduced after an intervention; to evaluate the correlation between visual assessment and ATP levels on the same surfaces; to identify aspects of the performance of the ATP method as a tool in evaluating hospital cleanliness.
A prospective intervention study in three phases was carried out in a medical ward and an intensive care unit (ICU) at a regional hospital in mid-Sweden between 2012 and 2013. Existing cleaning procedures were defined and baseline tests were sampled by visual inspection and ATP measurements of ten frequently touched surfaces in patients' rooms before and after intervention. The intervention consisted of educating nursing staff about the importance of hospital cleaning and direct feedback of ATP levels before and after cleaning.
The mixed model showed a significant decrease in ATP levels after the intervention (P
PubMed ID
26213368 View in PubMed
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Admission medical records made at night time have the same quality as day and evening time records.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262724
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Jul;61(7):A4868
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Ilda Amirian
Jacob F Mortensen
Jacob Rosenberg
Ismail Gögenur
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Jul;61(7):A4868
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Appendicitis - diagnosis
Denmark
Documentation - standards
Female
Gallstones - diagnosis
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - diagnosis
Humans
Intestinal Obstruction - diagnosis
Male
Medical Records - standards
Patient Admission
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Quality Control
Time Factors
Abstract
A thorough and accurate admission medical record is an important tool in ensuring patient safety during the hospital stay. Surgeons' performance might be affected during night shifts due to sleep deprivation. The aim of the study was to assess the quality of admission medical records during day, evening and night time.
A total of 1,000 admission medical records were collected from 2009 to 2013 based equally on four diagnoses: mechanical bowel obstruction, appendicitis, gallstone disease and gastrointestinal bleeding. The records were reviewed for errors by a pre-defined checklist based on Danish standards for admission medical records. The time of dictation for the medical record was registered.
A total of 1,183 errors were found in 778 admission medical records made during day- and evening time, and 322 errors in 222 admission medical records from night time shifts. No significant overall difference in error was found in the admission medical records when day and evening values were compared to night values. Subgroup analyses made for all four diagnoses showed no difference in day and evening values compared with night time values.
Night time deterioration was not seen in the quality of the medical records.
PubMed ID
25123118 View in PubMed
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[A dynamic medical record is invaluable for high-quality care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187688
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Oct 24;99(43):4280-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-24-2002

Air ambulance trauma transport: a quality review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211636
Source
J Trauma. 1996 Jul;41(1):26-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
M. van Wijngaarden
J. Kortbeek
R. Lafreniere
R. Cunningham
E. Joughin
R. Yim
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
J Trauma. 1996 Jul;41(1):26-31
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Ambulances - standards
Alberta
Female
Humans
Male
Quality Control
Quality of Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Triage - utilization
Utilization Review
Wounds and Injuries
Abstract
Provincial air ambulance transports of injured patients were quality reviewed prospectively to determine utilization and appropriateness of care.
All trauma air ambulance transports over a 2-month span were reviewed prospectively. Revised Trauma Score, Injury Severity Score, probability of survival, prehospital time, distance of transport, procedures performed, and outcome were determined. Quality control questions were asked of the sending and receiving physicians.
The majority of air ambulance transports reviewed (N = 97) were indicated for mechanism and severity of injury. Economics and requirement for advanced medical care were indications in only 15%. Physicians tended to perform more advanced procedures, likely related to higher patient Injury Severity Score (23 vs. 15, p = NS). Four problems with air ambulance access were identified. The overtriage rate was 5%. Inappropriate patient care was documented in six (6%) cases; a physician was present for only one of these.
A low overtriage rate was documented, raising concerns that the undertriage rate may be too high. Injured patients air transported without physician accompaniment more often received inappropriate care, suggesting that physician accompaniment is beneficial.
PubMed ID
8676420 View in PubMed
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Airway management in cardiac arrest--comparison of the laryngeal tube, tracheal intubation and bag-valve mask ventilation in emergency medical training.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180185
Source
Resuscitation. 2004 May;61(2):149-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
J. Kurola
H. Harve
T. Kettunen
J-P Laakso
J. Gorski
H. Paakkonen
T. Silfvast
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, FIN-70210 Kuopio, Finland. jouni.kurola@kuh.fi
Source
Resuscitation. 2004 May;61(2):149-53
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Airway Resistance
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - methods
Clinical Competence
Education, Professional
Emergency medical services
Emergency Medical Technicians - education
Female
Finland
Heart Arrest - therapy
Humans
Intubation, Intratracheal
Laryngeal Masks
Male
Probability
Quality Control
Respiration, Artificial - methods
Abstract
Tracheal intubation (ETI) is considered the method of choice for securing the airway and for providing effective ventilation during cardiac arrest. However, ETI requires skills which are difficult to maintain especially if practised infrequently. The laryngeal tube (LT) has been successfully tested and used in anaesthesia and in simulated cardiac arrest in manikins. To compare the initiation and success of ventilation with the LT, ETI and bag-valve mask (BVM) in a cardiac arrest scenario, 60 fire-fighter emergency medical technician (EMT) students formed teams of two rescuers at random and were allocated to use these devices. We found that the teams using the LT were able to initiate ventilation more rapidly than those performing ETI (P
PubMed ID
15135191 View in PubMed
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623 records – page 1 of 63.