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30 records – page 1 of 3.

An overview of mental health services for American Indians and Alaska Natives in the 1990s.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3365
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1992 Mar;43(3):257-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
S H Nelson
G F McCoy
M. Stetter
W C Vanderwagen
Author Affiliation
Indian Health Service, U.S. Public Health Service, Albuquerque, NM 87102.
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1992 Mar;43(3):257-61
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Mental Disorders - prevention & control - psychology - rehabilitation
Quality Assurance, Health Care - trends
Risk factors
Social Environment
United States
United States Indian Health Service - organization & administration
Abstract
Native Americans appear to be at higher risk than other U.S. ethnic groups for mental health problems, including depression, substance abuse, domestic violence, and suicide. Despite recent increases in the federal budget for mental health services for Native Americans, less than 50 percent of the estimated need for ambulatory services is being met. Initiatives to improve the quantity and quality of mental health services for Native Americans in the 1990s include development of a national mental health plan, increased technical assistance to Native American communities, additional training and research, and continued attention to standards that promote high-quality, culturally relevant care. Tribes themselves are seen as the most appropriate locus for initiation of programs for preventing emotional problems in their communities.
PubMed ID
1555821 View in PubMed
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Avoidable mortality in Qu├ębec and its regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220469
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1993 Sep;37(6):823-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
R. Pampalon
Author Affiliation
Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux, Ste-Foy, Québec, Canada.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1993 Sep;37(6):823-31
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asthma - mortality
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Health planning - trends
Humans
Hypertension - mortality
Infant
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Pregnancy
Quality Assurance, Health Care - trends
Quebec - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - mortality
Abstract
Avoidable mortality has been proposed as an outcome measure of health services and our aim, in this study, is to trace its general features and regional variations in Québec. For that purpose, comparisons are established between two time periods (1969-73 and 1982-90) and with several countries. Furthermore, regional SMRs (for the period 1982-90) are submitted to the Gail heterogeneity test and introduced in a stepwise regression with variables describing health services, socio-economic context and prevalence or incidence of related diseases. An analysis of proportional mortality is carried out in the two northern regions of Kativik and Baie-James. Avoidable mortality has dropped substantially in Québec, except in the case of asthma, and now displays excellent scores at the international level. Only three causes of death show significant regional variations: tuberculosis, hypertensive and cerebrovascular diseases and perinatal mortality. These variations are mainly associated with socio-economic factors but also with health services. Furthermore, the highest rates of avoidable death have been observed in Gaspésie, Saguenay/Lac St-Jean and in the two northern regions. These results are discussed through information already available on health services in Québec.
PubMed ID
8211298 View in PubMed
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A comprehensive and practical quality assurance program for community mental health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226708
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1991 Mar;36(2):102-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1991
Author
A B Eppel
C. Fuyarchuk
D. Phelps
A T Phelan
Author Affiliation
Community Mental Health Clinic, Guelph, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1991 Mar;36(2):102-6
Date
Mar-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Community Mental Health Centers - organization & administration - trends
Consumer Satisfaction
Humans
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Ontario
Quality Assurance, Health Care - trends
Referral and Consultation - trends
Abstract
The authors describe the implementation of a comprehensive quality assurance program, within a multi-disciplinary, multi-program mental health clinic. The quality assurance program is reviewed in relation to measures of structure, process and outcome.
PubMed ID
2044026 View in PubMed
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The concept of equity in health services research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212480
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1996 Mar;24(1):2-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
A. Krasnik
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, University of Copenhagen.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1996 Mar;24(1):2-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services - trends
Denmark
Forecasting
Health Care Rationing - trends
Health Policy - trends
Health Services Accessibility - trends
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Health services research - trends
Humans
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Quality Assurance, Health Care - trends
Abstract
A population approach and the general right to health and medical care have been important issues in the development of health policy over many centuries. However, equity is still a crucial issue in the planning and evaluation of health care. Many definitions and criteria related to equity have been formulated on the basis of conflicting theories and models. Three dimensions of fair and just resource allocation are essential when needs-based models are used: equity in access, utilization, and quality of care relative to needs. Health services research should concentrate on such outcome measures regarding equity and the effect of organizational and processual characteristics of health care systems. Prominent examples of such research efforts are presented, but, unfortunately, there are few reliable and systematic data from this kind of study. Health care researchers have a special responsibility towards the population at large to undertake qualified research on equity and to communicate the results to the general public.
PubMed ID
8740870 View in PubMed
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Source
Diagn Cytopathol. 2000 Jul;23(1):70-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
K. Lindholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Cytology and Pathology, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Diagn Cytopathol. 2000 Jul;23(1):70-2
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cervix Uteri - pathology
Cytodiagnosis - trends
Cytological Techniques - trends
Cytology - trends
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Mammography - trends
National Health Programs
Quality Assurance, Health Care - trends
Sweden
PubMed ID
10907938 View in PubMed
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Development of quality assurance in radiation therapy in North America.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240471
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1984 Jun;10 Suppl 1:9-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1984
Author
J S Laughlin
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1984 Jun;10 Suppl 1:9-13
Date
Jun-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Quality Assurance, Health Care - trends
Radioisotope Teletherapy - standards
Radiotherapy, High-Energy - standards
United States
Abstract
Although diagnostic radiology developed rapidly following Roentgen's discovery, limitations on voltage delayed penetrating external radiation therapy until after World War II. Quality assurance has developed in both the USA and Canada in many different institutions. Tolerances for implementation of the prescribed tumor dose have been established. A series of quality assurance procedures for calibration, three dimensional dose distributions, the treatment planning process, and for treatment delivery have been formulated in protocols and their development is sketched briefly. The importance of computerized tomography in treatment planning and computerized record and verify systems in treatment delivery is emphasized.
PubMed ID
6429104 View in PubMed
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Do vascular registers affect decision-making? Finnvasc Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205058
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1998;87(2):131-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
J P Salenius
M. Lepäntalo
P. Loponen
M. Luther
K. Ylönen
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University Hospital of Tampere. lljusa@uta.fi
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1998;87(2):131-4
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Collection - trends
Decision Support Techniques
Finland
Forecasting
Humans
Prospective Studies
Quality Assurance, Health Care - trends
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Vascular Surgical Procedures - trends
Abstract
Treatment activity of vascular diseases varies depending on population, preference of doctors and the availability of vascular surgical services. Vascular registry offers an opportunity to review practice, to compare outcome with a standard, and to implement change to improve practice. Prospective data collection of all reconstructive vascular procedures has been performed in Finland for seven years. According to a review of the first five years, combined vascular and endovascular activity has increased nation-wide from 3508 procedures done in 1991 to 5200 in 1995. There are marked regional differences in the frequency and selection of various treatment modalities, which can not be explained only by epidemiological data but as well by skewed vascular care delivery. This data can be used for decision-making and should be used for planning of the vascular surgical services in Finland.
PubMed ID
9676321 View in PubMed
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Early childhood programs in other nations: goals and outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35458
Source
Future Child. 1995;5(3):94-114
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
S S Boocock
Author Affiliation
Graduate School of Education, Rutgers University, USA.
Source
Future Child. 1995;5(3):94-114
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Curriculum - trends
Developing Countries
Early Intervention (Education) - trends
Educational Status
Female
Forecasting
Goals
Humans
Infant
Learning Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Male
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Personality Development
Psychosocial Deprivation
Quality Assurance, Health Care - trends
Abstract
United States interest in the potential early childhood programs have for improving outcomes for children is shared by policymakers and researchers in many other nations. Throughout the world, enrollments in preschool and child care programs are rising. This article reviews international research documenting how participation in early childhood programs influenced children's later development and success in school. Studies conducted in 13 nations (Australia, Canada, Colombia, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, Sweden, Turkey, and the United Kingdom) are included, along with key features of each nation's provision of early childhood programs. The article summarizes conclusions that are supported by research in various countries, indicating that participation in preschool promotes cognitive development and school success, although the specific type of program attended matters little. Preschool experience helps low-income children narrow, but not close, the achievement gap separating them from more advantaged children. International evidence also suggests that maternal employment and reliance on child care do not harm children and may yield benefits if the child care is of good quality. The author draws insights from the experience of other nations concerning such issues as defining quality, the effectiveness of early childhood programs in redressing social and economic inequities, and understanding how research can influence policy.
PubMed ID
8835516 View in PubMed
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European models of long-term care in the home and community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75349
Source
Int J Health Serv. 1995;25(3):455-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
B J Coleman
Author Affiliation
Center on Elderly People Living Alone, AARP Public Policy Institute, Washington DC 20049, USA.
Source
Int J Health Serv. 1995;25(3):455-74
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Community Health Services - utilization
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Europe
Forecasting
Frail Elderly
Health Policy - trends
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Health Services for the Aged - trends
Home Care Services - utilization
Homes for the Aged - trends
Humans
Institutionalization
Long-Term Care - trends
Nursing Homes - trends
Population Growth
Quality Assurance, Health Care - trends
Abstract
In the 1980s, faced with a rapidly increasing elderly population and soaring costs of health and long-term care services, many European governments began to reexamine fiscal policies that often encouraged institutionalization of frail and dependent elders. A number of these countries have now turned to new models of home and community-based care. This report describes home care policies that serve the needs of frail elders in Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, and Great Britain, with special attention to experimental projects that have tested varying approaches for providing high quality, low-cost care in the home and in the community. The central governments in these countries have developed long-term care systems that improve quality of care, ensure more efficient delivery of services, and control or lower costs. They have (1) discouraged the building of additional nursing homes and instead supported the development and expansion of a range of housing alternatives; (2) shifted greater responsibility to local governments for delivering long-term care services, bringing those services closer to those who need them; (3) developed care management techniques that enable care providers to better target appropriate services to each elderly client; and (4) provided incentives for different types of care providers to coordinate their work, resulting in improved service delivery and greater client satisfaction.
PubMed ID
7591375 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.