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Concepts of quality of care: national survey of five self-regulating health professions in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103850
Source
Qual Assur Health Care. 1990;2(1):89-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
C. Fooks
M. Rachlis
C. Kushner
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Qual Assur Health Care. 1990;2(1):89-109
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Medicine - standards
Data Collection
Dentistry - standards
Health Occupations - standards
Humans
Licensure
Medical Audit - statistics & numerical data
Nursing - standards
Optometry - standards
Organizations
Pharmacy - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Discussions of quality assurance mechanisms for health professions are increasing in Canada. In their roles of protecting the public from incompetent or unsafe health care, and enhancing the quality of care provided by practitioners, provincial licensing organizations are taking an interest in quality assurance programmes. The paper reports the results from a national survey of five self-regulating health professions (dentistry, medicine, nursing, optometry and pharmacy) in Canada. The study found two types of activities in place--a complaints programme and a routine audit programme. Both programmes use a similar approach to identifying poor performers within a health profession. The paper discusses the results of the study, the advantages and disadvantages of the approach used, and suggests a second approach to quality assurance which could be used in conjunction with current activities.
PubMed ID
2103875 View in PubMed
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IDU perspectives on the design and operation of North America's first medically supervised injection facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140462
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2011;46(5):561-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Will Small
Liz Ainsworth
Evan Wood
Thomas Kerr
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2011;46(5):561-8
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needle-Exchange Programs - organization & administration
North America
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Quality Assurance, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - organization & administration
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - psychology
Abstract
While the public health benefits of supervised injection facilities (SIFs) have been well documented, there is a lack of research examining the views of injection drug users (IDU) regarding the operation of these facilities. This study used 50 semistructured qualitative interviews to explore IDU perspectives on the design and operation of an SIF in Vancouver, Canada. Although the environment and operation of the SIF are well accepted, long wait times and limited operating hours, as well as regulations that prohibit sharing drugs and assisted injections, pose barriers to using the SIF. Modifying operating procedures and expanding the capacity of the current facility could address these barriers.
PubMed ID
20874006 View in PubMed
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Improving the quality of care for infants: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149217
Source
CMAJ. 2009 Oct 13;181(8):469-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-13-2009
Author
Shoo K Lee
Khalid Aziz
Nalini Singhal
Catherine M Cronin
Andrew James
David S C Lee
Derek Matthew
Arne Ohlsson
Koravangattu Sankaran
Mary Seshia
Anne Synnes
Robin Walker
Robin Whyte
Joanne Langley
Ying C MacNab
Bonnie Stevens
Peter von Dadelszen
Author Affiliation
Departments of Paediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. sklee@mtsinai.on.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2009 Oct 13;181(8):469-76
Date
Oct-13-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia - epidemiology - prevention & control
Canada
Cluster analysis
Cross Infection - epidemiology - therapy
Evidence-Based Medicine - methods - standards
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Male
Prospective Studies
Quality Assurance, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
We developed and tested a new method, called the Evidence-based Practice for Improving Quality method, for continuous quality improvement.
We used cluster randomization to assign 6 neonatal intensive care units (ICUs) to reduce nosocomial infection (infection group) and 6 ICUs to reduce bronchopulmonary dysplasia (pulmonary group). We included all infants born at 32 or fewer weeks gestation. We collected baseline data for 1 year. Practice change interventions were implemented using rapid-change cycles for 2 years.
The difference in incidence trends (slopes of trend lines) between the ICUs in the infection and pulmonary groups was - 0.0020 (95% confidence interval [CI] - 0.0007 to 0.0004) for nosocomial infection and - 0.0006 (95% CI - 0.0011 to - 0.0001) for bronchopulmonary dysplasia.
The results suggest that the Evidence-based Practice for Improving Quality method reduced bronchopulmonary dysplasia in the neonatal ICU and that it may reduce nosocomial infection.
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2009 Oct 13;181(8):457-819667032
Comment In: CMAJ. 2009 Sep 15;181(6-7):39919752146
PubMed ID
19667033 View in PubMed
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