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An evaluation of the QSP and the QPP: two methods for measuring patient satisfaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71895
Source
Int J Qual Health Care. 2001 Jun;13(3):257-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
J. Nathorst-Böös
I M Munck
I. Eckerlund
C. Ekfeldt-Sandberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. jorgen.nathorst-boos@ks.se
Source
Int J Qual Health Care. 2001 Jun;13(3):257-64
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Health Care Surveys - methods
Hospitals, University - standards
Humans
Models, Statistical
Multivariate Analysis
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital - standards
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Quality Assurance, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Patient satisfaction is a function of several variables addressing reasons why it is important to use methods in which these different factors can be isolated and their importance analysed. OBJECTIVE: In this project, two methods using this approach were used: the 'Quality from the Patient's Perspective' and the 'Quality, Satisfaction, Performance' models. The aim of the present study is to evaluate these two different methods with respect to application, strengths and weaknesses. DESIGN: In the Quality from the Patient's Perspective model, the patient judges the different domains in two dimensions: perceived reality and subjective importance. The Quality, Satisfaction, Performance model uses a multivariate analysis to capture the patient's priorities. Four hundred and sixty forms for each model were distributed to a random sample of patients at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Karolinska Hospital. MAIN MEASURES: The quality factors 'treatment by the nurse', 'participation', 'information', 'environment' and 'accessibility' were measured. RESULTS: On both forms, 'medical care', 'treatment by the doctor' and 'access to nursing treatment' received high scores in perceived reality' while 'accessibility' and 'participation' received low scores. 'Subjective importance' measured directly and indirectly, respectively, in the two models showed high values for 'medical care' and 'treatment by the doctor'. CONCLUSION: The advantages of the Quality from the Patient's Perspective model are that it has a comprehensive and solid question bank. The Quality, Satisfaction, Performance model's advantage is its immediate usefulness and its clear graphic presentation. An integration and further development of these two approaches may prove useful.
PubMed ID
11476150 View in PubMed
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Concepts of quality of care: national survey of five self-regulating health professions in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103850
Source
Qual Assur Health Care. 1990;2(1):89-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
C. Fooks
M. Rachlis
C. Kushner
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Qual Assur Health Care. 1990;2(1):89-109
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Medicine - standards
Data Collection
Dentistry - standards
Health Occupations - standards
Humans
Licensure
Medical Audit - statistics & numerical data
Nursing - standards
Optometry - standards
Organizations
Pharmacy - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Discussions of quality assurance mechanisms for health professions are increasing in Canada. In their roles of protecting the public from incompetent or unsafe health care, and enhancing the quality of care provided by practitioners, provincial licensing organizations are taking an interest in quality assurance programmes. The paper reports the results from a national survey of five self-regulating health professions (dentistry, medicine, nursing, optometry and pharmacy) in Canada. The study found two types of activities in place--a complaints programme and a routine audit programme. Both programmes use a similar approach to identifying poor performers within a health profession. The paper discusses the results of the study, the advantages and disadvantages of the approach used, and suggests a second approach to quality assurance which could be used in conjunction with current activities.
PubMed ID
2103875 View in PubMed
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IDU perspectives on the design and operation of North America's first medically supervised injection facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140462
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2011;46(5):561-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Will Small
Liz Ainsworth
Evan Wood
Thomas Kerr
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2011;46(5):561-8
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needle-Exchange Programs - organization & administration
North America
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Quality Assurance, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - organization & administration
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - psychology
Abstract
While the public health benefits of supervised injection facilities (SIFs) have been well documented, there is a lack of research examining the views of injection drug users (IDU) regarding the operation of these facilities. This study used 50 semistructured qualitative interviews to explore IDU perspectives on the design and operation of an SIF in Vancouver, Canada. Although the environment and operation of the SIF are well accepted, long wait times and limited operating hours, as well as regulations that prohibit sharing drugs and assisted injections, pose barriers to using the SIF. Modifying operating procedures and expanding the capacity of the current facility could address these barriers.
PubMed ID
20874006 View in PubMed
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